Horse Market Brief

An Expert's View about Horses, Other Equines and Camelids in South Korea

Last updated: 15 Jun 2011

The United States remained the largest supplier of horses to Korea in 2010 and accounted for 65 percent of the imported horses by value ($13.3 million) and 53 percent by number (348 heads).

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Voluntary - Public Date: 2011-05-31 GAIN Report Number: KS1126 Korea - Republic of Post: Seoul ATO Horse Market Brief Report Categories: Livestock and Products Approved By: Michael Fay, Director Prepared By: Sangyong Oh, Marketing Specialist Report Highlights: Korea imported horses valued at $20.3 million in 2010, up 39 percent from the previous year. The United States is the leading supplier of horses to Korea and accounted for 65 percent market share. Demand for imported horses is expected to remain strong as a new racecourse will be constructed in 2015 and the Korean government introduced ?Horse Industry Development Act? in 2011. Although facing increased competition from both competitor countries and local breeders, the United States is expected to remain a key supplier of high quality race horses, thoroughbred breeding mares, and equestrian horses to Korea in the coming years. General Information: Author Defined: Table of Contents Section I. Market Overview Section II. Market Sector Opportunities and Threats 1. The Horse Industry in Korea 2. Entry Strategy 3. Market Trends and Buyer Profile 3-1. Thoroughbred Breeding Horses 3-2. Race Horses 3-3. Other Horses Section III. Market Access 1. Tariffs & Taxes 2. Health Requirements for Imported Horses Attachment 1. Tests for Diseases and Test Methods Attachment 2. Test Requirements for Stallions Vaccinated against EVA in the Exporting Country Section VI. Key Contacts and Further Information Section I. Market Overview The total value of horses that the Republic of Korea (herein after referred as Korea) imported in 2010 amounted to $20.3 million, up 39 percent from the previous year. The total number of horses imported was 660 (594 in 2009), and the average import price of a horse was $31,000, ($24,500 in 2009). The United States remained the largest supplier of horses to Korea in 2010 and accounted for 65 percent of the imported horses by value ($13.3 million) and 53 percent by number (348 heads). Major competitors, Australia and Germany, accounted for 7 and 17 percent of imports by value respectively. After peaking in 2006 at $26.2 million, total value of horse imports by Korea had shown a gradual decline through 2009 mainly due to a significant drop in the imports of thoroughbred breeding mares. The global wide financial crisis over 2008-2009 also took a serious toll on the horse imports, as much of the local buyers of imported horses were small-scale breeders and race horse owners. However, horse industry in Korea is reportedly recovering from this set back, and the imports are expected to maintain double digit growth over the next few years. Figure 1: Total Horse Imports by Korea Source: Korean Customs Office Import Database Table 1: Horse Imports from Major Suppliers Y 2006 2007 2008 2009 210 ear Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value Imports from Leading Suppliers (Unit: $1,000, number of horses) U.S. 369 16,698 417 15,131 306 8,248 229 6,306 348 13,310 Australia 208 4,235 204 3,856 246 4,589 191 3,483 78 1,347 Germany 82 2,033 106 4,151 50 1,171 45 1,256 90 3,418 Import Market Share by Leading Suppliers (Unit: percent) U.S. 40 64 47 60 43 46 39 43 53 65 Australia 23 16 23 15 35 26 32 24 12 7 Germany 9 8 12 16 7 7 8 9 14 17 Source: Korean Customs Office Import Database Race horses accounted for 47 percent (by value) of total horses imported in 2010, followed by thoroughbred breeding horses (27 percent) and other horses (26 percent - horses for equestrian riding and other purposes). The United States remained the leading supplier for race horses and thoroughbred breeding horses (60 percent and 98 percent market share respectively), but were less dominant for other horses category (42 percent market share). Races horses are likely to remain the leading category of imported horses in the coming years as increased numbers of breeding mares are supplied locally. The opening of a new racecourse in Busan (the second largest city in Korea) in September 2005 provided an important opportunity for the Korean horse industry to expand. In addition to the existing 1,450 race horses registered with the Seoul racecourse (the only racecourse back then), 760 race horses were newly registered with the Busan racecourse upon opening. Korean government approved in 2010 another racecourse in Youngchun, Gyungsangdo province, which is expected to expand the market again for both local horse breeders and foreign suppliers over the next few years. The Youngchun racecourse, which is currently planned to open in August 2015, will be similar to the Busan racecourse in scale of operation and will race some 800 registered horses. Imported horses are likely to account for a significant portion of the horses registered with the Youngchun racecourse. Another important market trend that should help expand the local horse industry in the coming years is the increased interest of Koreans in equestrian sports. To actively promote the growth of equestrian sports, the Korean government introduced ?Horse Industry Development Act? on March 9, 2011. The interest of this act is to create income and jobs in the local agricultural sector. The act is targeted to increase the total number of horses in Korea from the current 29,000 to 50,000 by 2015, while creating 18,000 new jobs in the industry. As a follow up of the act, the Korean government plans to designate ?Special Districts for Horse Industry? in several provinces with government support funds in the near future where related businesses and academic institutes will be newly created. Table 2: Advantages & Challenges Advantages Challenges Strong demand for imported horses U.S. exporters lack knowledge of up-to-date market demand and trend in Korea High reputation of U.S. horses Horse imports are subject to very tight quarantine heath inspections Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement will remove Many Korean buyers are small-scale import tariffs on U.S. horses over 5 years. breeders and have limited resources A new racecourse is under construction and will There is a ceiling price for imported horses generate additional demand for imported horses that can participate local races Strong Korean government policy initiative to Competitors offer very aggressive marketing develop local horse industry supports and lower prices Section II. Market Sector Opportunities and Threats 1. The Horse Industry in Korea Official races administered by the Korea Racing Authority (KRA, www.kra.co.kr) are currently the main driving force of the horse industry in Korea. KRA is a quasi-government agency that manages the three official racecourses in Seoul, Busan, and Jeju. KRA total revenue from betting was 7.5 trillion won (approximately $7 billion) in 2010. Majority of the horses raised in and imported into Korea are meant to support KRA races. There are 1,450 thoroughbred race horses registered with the Seoul racecourse, which is located in the Seoul suburb of Gwacheon. Another 760 thoroughbred race horses are registered with the Busan racecourse, which opened in September 2005. The racecourse in Jeju Island is only for about 500 native ponies (indigenous local ponies) registered with the Jeju racecourse. About 75 percent of the thoroughbred race horses registered with the racecourses are domestically produced, and the remaining 25 percent imported. KRA maintains an internal policy to supply 75 percent of the race horses from domestic production to promote development of local horse industry. Jeju ponies registered with the Jeju racecourse are all domestic. Korean government approved a new racecourse in Youngchun, Gyungsangdo province in 2010. With 1.2 million sq. meter space, this new racecourse is expected to be similar in scale of operation as the Busan racecourse. KRA plans to have about 800 race horses registered with the Youngchun racecourse upon opening. It is expected that a significant portion (as much as 40 percent according to an industry source) of the horses under the Youngchun racecourse upon opening will be imported horses as local breeders alone can not satisfy the demand for new horses within the limited lead time before the planned opening. KRA also plans to develop a 0.7 million sq. meter training facility in Youngchun racecourse. Table 3: Summary of KRA Racecourse Operation Racecourse Operation 2010 2011 (Plan) Total Days of Race 92 94 Seoul Racecourse (Night Race Days) (8) (8) 1,150,000 m2 Total Number of Races 1,058 1,064 77,000 Seats 1 Total N,472 Horse stalls umber of Spectators 17.1 million 16.1 million Total Betting Money 4.7 trillion won 4.7 trillion won Total Days of Race 92 94 Busan Racecourse (Night Race Days) (8) (8) 1,240,000 m2 Total Number of Races 736 746 30,000 Seats 1,008 Horse stalls Total Number of Spectators 5.0 million 4.9 million Total Betting Money 2.0 trillion won 2.1 trillion won Total Days of Race 90 92 Jeju Racecourse (Night Race Days) (8) (8) 2,175,000 m2 Total Number of Races 840 852 6,393 Seats 550 Total Number of Spectators 0.3 million 0.4 million Horse stalls Total Betting Money 0.8 trillion won 1 trillion won Total Number of Spectators 22.5 million 21.4 million Total Revenue from Betting 7.5 trillion won 7.8 trillion won Source: www.kra.co.kr (company profile information) According to a Korean government report, there were 1,742 horse farms in Korea in 2009 that raised a total of 28,700 horses of all breeds. About 30 percent of the horses were thoroughbred horses while the rest were native breeds. Jeju Island, which had been the center of horse industry in Korea since the 13th century, accounted for 73 percent of the total horse population in Korea. Local horse farms were reportedly supplying about 3,500 horses to the market annually, including about 1,000 thoroughbred race horses. Table 4: Korean Horse Industry Year Number of Farms Number of Horses By Breed Total Male Female Thoroughbred Native Ass & Mule 2005 965 20,487 6,964 13,523 8,242 11,915 330 2007 1,291 24,951 7,524 17,427 8,062 16,607 282 2009 1,742 28,718 10,157 18,561 9,901 18,396 431 Source: Statistics of Agriculture, Forestry, and Food Sector of Korea 2010 (Korean Government) An estimated 20,000 Koreans participated in equestrian sports, and the industry kept 5,000 horses and 190 tracks for riders in 2009. Total annual revenue of the equestrian industry was estimated at 0.5 trillion won. 2. Entry Strategy Established thoroughbred auction markets in the United States are the major channel that Korean horse buyers purchase American horses. Auctions provide the buyers with an opportunity to evaluate a large number of candidate horses from many different suppliers under one roof. Buyers prefer to attend the auction together with a veterinary expert to inspect the horses on-site, and the purchases are normally conducted through intermediary brokers who provide credit and consolidated shipping service, including insurance, at a pre-agreed fee. Some of larger scale buyers, including stud purpose stallion purchases by KRA, may purchase directly from horse farms and owners in the United States with assistance of intermediary brokers. The Ocala Fall Mixed Sales, Florida, is the most popular auction market in the United States for Korean buyers. The spring race horse and the summer yearling auctions in Ocala are also drawing an increased number of Korean buyers. It is expected that those Korean buyers who are seeking higher quality thoroughbred horses would also be interested in attending the Keeneland auctions, Kentucky, in the coming years. Established intermediary brokers who maintain close contacts with key Korean buyers should be the best source of information about planned purchases and visits to the American auctions by Korean buyers. In addition, these brokers should be able to provide the suppliers with up-to-date information about regulatory issues (quarantine inspection and documentation requirements) as well as shipping arrangement. Industry sources indicate that securing service of reliable broker is a key to successful importing of horses. Fees collected by brokers could be quite high due to the nature of the business (industry sources estimate that it should cost about $10,000 of fee for credit and consolidated shipping service). 3. Market Trends and Buyer Profile 3-1. Thoroughbred Breeding Horses There are about 130 thoroughbred breeders in Korea, most of who belong to one of two organizations. About 90 breeders are members of the Korea Thoroughbred Breeders Association (KTBA), located in Jeju Island, and about 20 breeders are members of Korea Inland Breeders Association (KIBA), located at the Seoul Race Park. The remaining 20 breeders are non-member independent breeders. Together, these breeders raise a total of about 2,800 young horses (under training), 2,500 breeding mares, and 90 stud stallions. Each year they supply about 1,000 race horses to the local race industry. The number of breeding horses imported into Korea has shown a significant decline over the last several years as more of the breeding horses needed in the industry are supplied by local farms. In addition, KRA policy encourages more mares to participate in races so that they can be recycled as breeding horses after retiring from racing. While fewer breeding mares are expected to be imported in the coming years, average value of an imported breeding mare is likely to be kept high as Korean breeders intend to produce better quality foals which they can sell at higher prices. Much of the imported breeding horses are pregnant mares as foals born in Korea are recognized as local horses and can avoid the 25 percent cap allowed on imported horses in KRA races. There is no ceiling price set for imports of breeding mares. Many thoroughbred horse breeders are farmers who are still learning the business. They generally work with intermediary brokers when importing horses. At the same time, they are highly interested in establishing direct relationships with U.S. suppliers to obtain technical information and market intelligence. In the past, ATO Seoul, working in cooperation with the U.S. Livestock and Genetics Export, Inc., organized delegations of horse breeders to major auctions in the United States. Table 5: Imports of Breeding Horses by Korea Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 210 Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value USA 132 8,532 186 5,721 136 4,330 110 3,466 119 5,369 Australia 58 2,055 43 1,133 48 1,391 38 604 2 0 Belgium 0 0 6 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 31 0 0 Germany 21 430 1 14 1 20 0 0 0 0 Ireland 0 0 0 0 1 27 0 0 0 0 France 8 345 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indonesia 0 0 2 90 0 0 0 0 0 0 U.K. 2 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 23 303 17 193 10 123 0 0 6 91 New Zealand 12 336 4 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 252 12,040 259 7,327 196 5,891 164 4,101 127 5,460 U.S. M/S 52% 71% 72% 78% 69% 74% 67% 85% 94% 98% Source: Korean Customs Office Import Database (Unit: $1,000, number of horses) 3-2. Race Horses Race horse owners registered with local racecourses are the major buyers of race horses. Currently there are 466 race horse owners registered under the Seoul racecourse, and 291 under the Busan racecourse. Each horse owner is allowed to keep a maximum of 10 horses in the KRA barns due to the limited number of stalls. The 176 race horse owners registered under the Jeju racecourse buys local ponies only. Each year local breeders supply about 1,000 new race horses to the local race industry. Although the 25 percent cap allowed on imported horses in KRA races limit the imports of race horses, race horse owners maintain a strong demand for imported race horses for higher quality horses. As a result, about 200 to 300 race horses have been imported into Korea each year. Due to an agreement between the owners and KRA for a more equitable playing field, currently there is a ceiling set for the purchase price of an imported race horse ($20,000). Recently the owners and KRA have agreed on a higher ceiling ($70,000) on imported race mares so that these higher quality mares can be recycled as breeding horses after retiring from races. Although increased number of race horse owners attend foreign auctions and import horses directly, some race horses are imported and distributed by KRA, which intends to play a mediator and supporting role on behalf of the industry. KRA purchases race horses from KRA stud farm in Jeju (KRA breeds and trains some 300 horses on its own farm), local breeders, and foreign suppliers, which are sold to race horse owners through KRA auctions. It is likely that a significant portion of the new race horses imported for the Youngchun racecourse (under construction) will be imported through KRA. KRA also imports high quality stallions for its stud program. For example, KRA imported ?One Cool Cat? from the United States at $2 million in 2009. KRA currently provides stud service to breeders at half the market price (breeders pay about $5,000 per each stud service). American race horses have built a high reputation among local horse owners and breeders with strong track records over the years. It is notable that racecourses in both Korea and the United States are the same dust/sand ground, whereas some of the competitors such as Japan run races on grass. As a result, Korean buyers in general prefer American race horses over horses from any other countries. The KRA web-site below provides race results of all official races administered in the three KRA race courses. Information provided include race dates, race courses, race numbers, distance classifications, finishing positions, number of runners, time, earned money, total prize money, weight carried, and the names of jockeys. U.S. suppliers can gain access to the KRA's web site and obtain race results of U.S. race horses imported into Korea. 1. www.studbook.co.kr 2. Click English (on the top line) 3. Click Imported Horse and then Imported Racehorses 4. Click Display after selecting Country, Year and Last Race Date (Select All) 5. Click Foaling Date of the racehorse you are interested in 6. Click Race Records (on the top line) Table 6: Imports of Race Horses by Korea Y 2006 2007 2008 2009 210 ear Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value USA 141 2,730 138 3,011 152 3,794 102 2,525 200 5,757 Australia 78 1,340 98 2,265 104 2,345 86 2,112 33 884 Belgium 0 0 7 77 4 474 0 0 7 657 Germany 19 987 36 2,661 19 529 8 627 27 1,637 U.K. 3 60 0 0 3 62 0 0 0 0 Japan 19 283 26 448 17 380 23 546 3 82 New Zealand 8 218 34 814 0 0 21 516 27 624 Qatar 1 1,183 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 269 6,800 339 9,276 299 7,584 240 6,326 297 9,642 U.S. M/S 52% 40% 41% 32% 51% 50% 43% 40% 67% 60% Source: Korean Customs Office Import Database (Unit: $1,000, number of horses) 3-3. Other Horses Although much of the horses for ?other? purposes are supplied domestically, there is a strong demand for high quality imported horses as more Koreans participate in equestrian sports. It is likely that a significant number of new horse farms that offer equestrian riding will be open around major metropolitan areas in Korea in the coming years. The United States maintains less dominant market share for ?other horses? category because Korean buyers import horses for equestrian purpose from more diverse countries. Table 7: Imports of Other Horses by Korea Y 2006 2007 2008 2009 210 ear Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value Head Value USA 96 5,436 93 6,399 18 124 17 315 29 2,184 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 128 12 253 Australia 72 840 63 458 94 853 67 767 43 463 Belgium 3 80 6 389 4 33 0 0 14 198 Brazil 3 12 6 38 6 51 0 0 0 0 China 159 118 48 17 50 22 60 27 47 17 Germany 42 616 69 1,476 30 622 37 629 63 1,781 France 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 36 Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2,287 3 63 Kazak 3 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Netherlands 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 56 U.K. 0 0 0 0 3 2,734 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 4 27 1 12 0 0 0 0 New Zealand 18 274 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Poland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 172 Russia 0 0 0 0 6 57 0 0 0 0 Total 396 7,396 289 8,804 212 4,508 190 4,153 236 5,223 U.S. M/S 24% 73% 32% 73% 8% 3% 9% 8% 12% 42% Source: Korean Customs Office Import Database (Unit: $1,000, number of horses) Section III. Market Access 1. Tariffs and Taxes All imported horses are currently subject to 8 percent import tariff calculated on the CIF (Cost, Insurance and Freight) import value. In addition, 10 percent valued added tax (VAT) is imposed on the CIF value of imported horses. With approval from the competent Korean government agencies, horses imported by breeding farmers and equestrian event horses for Korea's national representative players are exempted the import tariff. The Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA), which is currently pending in the national assembly in both countries for ratification, will remove the current 8 percent import tariff on all American horses imported into Korea over five years once the FTA goes into effect. 2. Health Requirements for Imported Horses Imports of horses are subject to Korean health requirements. Failure to meet the requirements may result in rejection or elimination of the animal at the cost of the supplier. Currently there is no country that is banned from exporting horses to Korea for quarantine issues. Attached below is an unofficial translation of the health requirements for imported horses. MAFFF (Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Fishery and Food) Notification No. 2009-234 The import health requirements for horses (MAFFF Notification No. 88-27; October 31, 1988) have been amended and they are notified as follows. August 25, 2009 1. These import health requirements apply to horses exported to the Republic of Korea (hereinafter referred to as ?Korea?). 2. Requirements concerning the freedom of communicable diseases or vaccination for the horses exported to Korea (animals of equine genus including horses, mules, and donkeys, etc.; hereinafter referred to as the ?horses for export?) are as follows; A. The horses for export shall be produced in a region or state, where there have been no outbreaks of dourine, glanders, African horse sickness, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, and equine vesicular stomatitis for 2 years prior to shipping, and where no vaccination is conducted against the diseases mentioned above. B. The horses for export shall be produced in a region or state where there have been no outbreaks of West Nile Fever (WNF) for at least 60 days before the export quarantine commences. However, in the case of horses produced in a region or state where WNF has occurred, the result of the test for WNF using the method shown in Attachment 1 shall be negative or the horses shall be vaccinated. C. There shall have been no outbreaks of equine infectious anaemia, contagious equine metritis, equine piroplasmosis, equine viral arteritis, strangles, rabies, horse pox, mange, Salmonella abortus equi, surra, pseudoglanders, and anthrax in the farm where the horses for export were produced and raised for 6 months prior to shipping. D. Vaccination against equine viral arteritis (EVA) is permitted only for stallions, but they shall meet the test requirements in the exporting country for vaccinated stallions described in Attachment 2. In the event that stallions vaccinated against EVA are imported, two heads of mares negative to EVA shall be imported as well per stallion for the mating test to be conducted during the import inspection in Korea. 3. The government of the exporting country shall conduct the quarantine on the horses for export in compliance with the following conditions: A. The horses for export shall be held in an export quarantine facility or an export quarantine place recognized by the veterinary authority of the government of the exporting country under the supervision of a veterinarian for at least 7 days prior to shipping. B. The horses for export shall not be in contact with horses other than the ones for export to Korea during the export quarantine period. C. The horses for export shall be healthy and free of clinical symptoms of infectious or contagious diseases, and the test results for external parasites shall be normal. D. After the horses for export enter the quarantine place, the tests listed in Attachment 1 shall be conducted at a laboratory recognized by the government of the exporting country, and the test results shall be negative. E. Fodder and bedding materials used during the quarantine or transportation shall be from the area where the horses for export were produced and sanitary. F. The horses for export shall be conveyed by cages, vehicles, vessels, or aircrafts that have been disinfected by the method approved by the government of the exporting country, and they shall not be in contact with other animals that have not been quarantined during transportation. 4. When exporting the horses, the government of the exporting country shall issue an export health certificate in English that covers the following information to be presented to the Korean quarantine authority: A. Information stipulated in Article 2 ? A, B, and C above. B. Information stipulated in Article 3 (from A to F) above, and the information on the date, method and result of the tests conducted for each animal in accordance with Attachment 1. In the case of stallions vaccinated against EVA (mares for the mating test included), the following information is additionally to be provided in accordance with the conditions described in Attachment 2: (1) Pre-vaccination test: date of blood sampling, date, method and result of the test (2) Post-vaccination test: date of blood sampling, date, method, and result of the test (for each test) (3) Mating test (A) Pre-mating test: date of blood sampling, date, method, and result of the test (B) Post-mating test: date of mating, date of blood sampling, date, method, and result of the test, and clinical symptoms of the mares until the completion of the quarantine. C. Names and addresses of the consignor and the consignee D. Identification number, sex and age of the horse for export E. If vaccinated, the type of the vaccine and the date of vaccination F. Name and address of the export quarantine facility or the export quarantine place, and the quarantine period Additional Clause 1 (Enforcement date) This notification goes into effect immediately. 2 MAFFF Notification 2004-79 (Health Requirements for Imported Horses, December 23, 2004) is discarded. 3. Revision or discard of this notification reflecting changes in regulatory or practical environment shall be done by August 24, 2012. Attachment 1. Tests for Diseases and Test Methods Test Method Name of If the Disease Occurs in the If the Disease Does Not Occur in the Disease Country: Country: Equine influenza, Equine Japanese encephalitis, Equine Vaccination recommended Vaccination recommended rhinopneumonitis, Getah virus infection Antiserum inoculation Te Antiserum inoculation recommended tanus recommended within 7 days within 7 days of shipping of shipping AGID test: negative; OR African horse sickness AGID test: negative Certification of no outbreaks of the disease for the past 2 years in the exporting country CF test: negative; OR Dourine CF test: negative Certification of no outbreaks of the disease for the past 2 years in the exporting country CF test or Mallein test: negative; OR Gla CF test or Mallein test: nders Certification of no outbreaks of the negative disease for the past 2 years in the exporting country SN test: negative; Equine OR vesicular SN test: negative Certification of no outbreaks of the stomatitis disease for the past 2 years in the in the exporting country HI test or CF test: negative; Ve OR nezuelan equine HI test or CF test: negative Certification of no outbreaks of the encephalitis disease for the past 2 years in the exporting country - Unvaccinated horses: HI test or CF test: negative; HI test or CF test: negative; Equine - Vaccinated horses ( the OR encephalomyelitis (EEE horses vaccinated with Certification of no outbreaks of the and WEE) inactivated vaccines only): disease for the past 2 years in the HI test or CF test; 2 tests 2 exporting country weeks apart with no rise in titer. AGID test: negative; Equine OR infectious AGID test: negative Certification of no outbreaks of the anaemia disease for the past 2 years in the exporting country Serological test: negative; Equine OR piroplasmosis CF test or fluorescent Certification of no outbreaks of the (B. equi, B. caballi) antibody test: negative disease for the past 2 years in the exporting country SN test: negative; OR SN test: negative Equine Certification of no outbreaks of the viral arteritis (vaccinated stallions are disease for the past 2 years in the excluded) exporting country (vaccinated stallions are excluded) SA test: negative; OR Salmonella abortus Serum agglutination test: Certification of no outbreaks of the equine negative disease for the past 2 years in the exporting country Equine Influenza, Equine Japanese Encephalitis, Getah virus infection, Contagious equine metritis, R No clinical evidence of these diseases at examination or negative results abies, Hor to the tests conducted by the government of the exporting country. se pox, Mange, Surra, Strangles, Pseudoglanders, Equine rhinopneumonitis Serological test (in accordance with the test method designated by the government of the exporting country such as ELISA); negative; OR If the horses for export have not been vaccinated with West Nile Virus (WNV) inactivated vaccine in the past: Two vaccination at an interval of 21-42 days with WNV inactivated West Nile Fever vaccine within 1 year of shipping; OR If the horses for export have been vaccinated with WNV inactivated vaccine in the past: One vaccination with WNV inactivated vaccine within 1 year of shipping. Attachment 2. Test Requirements for Stallions Vaccinated against EVA in the Exporting Country Stallions vaccinated against EVA shall meet the requirements shown below. Pre-vaccination Test 1. The government of the exporting country shall take blood samples from the stallions immediately before the vaccination and conduct the SN test at the serum dilution rate of 1:4, and confirm that the test results are negative. Post-vaccination Test 2. 3 blood samples (one at the farm and two at the export quarantine facility before shipping) shall be taken from the vaccinated stallions. There shall be no significant rise (4 times) or drop as a result of the SN test conducted on the 3 serums at the same time. The interval between taking blood samples shall be at least 14 days, and the 3rd blood sample shall be taken within 10 days of shipping. 3. (Mating test for vaccinated stallions) Mating tests shall be conducted for vaccinated stallions. Two mares to be used for the mating test shall meet the import health requirements for horses to Korea. The mares shall be isolated in the export quarantine facility with the vaccinated stallions for 30 days prior to shipping, and they shall be negative as a result of the following tests: A. (Pre-mating test): Before the mares for the mating test enter the export quarantine facility, blood samples shall be taken from them. An SN test at the serum dilution rate of 1:4 shall be conducted, and the test result shall be negative. B. (Post-mating test): During the 30 days of the export quarantine, the two mares for the mating test shall be mated with the vaccinated stallions twice a day for two days. Blood samples shall be taken from the two mares, on the 14th day and the 28th day after the last mating, and results of the SN test conducted at the serum dilution rate of 1:4 shall be negative. C. No symptoms of EVA shall be found in the two mating mares during the 30 days of the export quarantine. Section VI. Key Contacts and Further Information ? For further information about the Korean agricultural market, please contact: U.S. Agricultural Trade Office Seoul Korean Address: Room 303, Leema Building, 146-1, Susong-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul, Korea U.S. Mailing Address: U.S. Embassy Seoul, Unit 15550-ATO, APO, AP 96205-5550 Telephone: 82-2 397-4188 Fax: 82-2 720-7921 E-mail: atoseoul@fas.usda.gov Internet homepage: www.atoseoul.com Agricultural Affairs Office, U.S. Embassy Seoul Korean Address: U.S. Embassy, 82, Sejong-ro, Jongro-gu, Seoul, Korea U.S. Mailing Address: U.S. Embassy Seoul, Unit 15550-AgAff, APO, AP 96205-5550 Telephone: 82-2 397-4297 Fax: 82-2 738-7147 E-mail: agseoul@usda.gov ? For more information on how you can register for USDA/FAS? Supplier List: The United States Department of Agriculture?s Foreign Agricultural Service (USDA/FAS) offers information and services that can be beneficial to both new and experienced exporters. For example, the U.S. Suppliers Service is a searchable database of over 5,000 U.S. exporters and their products, which is used by USDA/FAS to help facilitate connecting potential buyers with U.S. suppliers. This database is used by more than 85 USDA FAS Overseas offices to help export agents, trading companies, importers and foreign market buyers locate U.S. suppliers. It is also used to recruit U.S. exporters to participate in market development activities sponsored by USDA and federal export programs. You can register online for this service at http://www.fas.usda.gov/agx/partners_trade_leads/us_suppliers_list.asp ? For further information about sanitary and phytosanitary requirements, please contact: U.S. Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service Seoul (APHIS) Korean Address: Room 303, Leema Building, 146-1, Susong-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul, Korea U.S. Mailing Address: U.S. Embassy Seoul, Unit 15550-APHIS, APO, AP 96205-5550 Telephone: 82-2 725-5495 Fax: 82-2 725-5496 E-mail: yunhee.kim@aphis.usda.gov Internet Homepage: www.aphis.usda.gov ? For information about financial supports and export aid programs offered by Strategic Trade Regional Groups, please contact: Food Export Association of the Midwest USA 309 W. Washington St., Suite 600 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Telephone: 312-334-9200 Fax: 312 334-9230 E-mail: thamilton@foodexport.org Website: www.foodexport.org Western United States Agricultural Trade Association (WUSATA) 2500 Main Street, Suite 110, Vancouver, WA 98660-2697, USA Telephone: 360-693-3373 Fax: 360-693-3464 E-mail: janet@wusata.org Website: www.wusata.org Food Export USA - Northeast Region of the United States 150 S. Independence Mall West, 1036 Public Ledger Building Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA Telephone: 215-829-9111 Fax: 215-829-9777 E-mail: jcanono@foodexportusa.org Website: www.foodexportusa.org Southern United States Agricultural Trade Association (SUSTA) 2 Canal Street Suite 2515, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA Telephone: 504-568-5986 Fax: 504-568-6010 E-mail: jim@susta.org Website: www.susta.org ? For information on the non-agricultural commercial and industrial products in Korea, please contact: U.S. Commercial Service Korean Address: U.S. Embassy, 82, Sejong-ro, Jongro-gu, Seoul, Korea U.S. Mailing Address: U.S. Embassy Seoul, Unit 15550-USCS, APO, AP 96205-5550 Telephone: 82-2 397-4535 Fax: 82-2 739-1628 E-mail: Seoul.office.box@mail.doc.gov Homepage: www.buyusa.gov/korea
Posted: 15 June 2011, last updated 15 June 2011