Caribbean Basin - Exporter Guide 2012

An Expert's View about Business Environment in the Bahamas

Posted on: 11 Jan 2013

This report aims to provide U.S. suppliers general information on opportunities in the Caribbean Basin and how to best approach this diverse and dynamic market.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 12/31/2012 GAIN Report Number: CB1224 Caribbean Basin Exporter Guide Caribbean Basin Exporter Guide Approved By: Omar Gonzalez Prepared By: Omar Gonzalez Report Highlights: Despite sluggish economic conditions throughout the Caribbean, U.S. exports of consumer-oriented farm products to the region continue on the ascent, reaching a record high $823 million in 2011. Preliminary data indicate that yet a new record export level will be set in 2012. With little agricultural production of its own, the Caribbean islands depend heavily on imported food products, particularly from the United States. This report aims to provide U.S. suppliers general information on opportunities in the Caribbean Basin and how to best approach this diverse and dynamic market. Post: Miami ATO Executive Summary: NOTE: For purposes of this report, the term “Caribbean” refers to the Caribbean Basin Agricultural Trade Office’s (CBATO) islands of coverage: Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, The Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Montserrat, the former Netherlands Antilles (Bonaire, Curaçao, Saba, Sint Eustatius, and Sint Maarten), St. Barthélemy, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Martin, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turks and Caicos Islands. The Caribbean is an excellent market for U.S. suppliers, due in large part to the fact that demand for imported food products is largely inelastic. With an insufficient amount of arable land, scant water resources in some islands, no economies of scale, and a limited food-processing sector, the islands must import the majority of their food needs. There is also strong appeal among the 3.9 million local residents of U.S. products. Moreover, between six and seven million stop-over tourists (over half of which are from the United States) visit the Caribbean annually and help fuel demand for U.S. products in Caribbean food service outlets. While sluggish economic conditions in most advanced economies are keeping tourism growth prospects in check, the sector is slowly inching forward. Given these favorable conditions for U.S. exports, it is no surprise that the United States is the largest supplier of food products to the Caribbean. In 2011, the United States exported a record high $823 million worth of consumer-oriented products to the region, a 5 percent increase from the previous year’s record. Preliminary data indicate that U.S. exports of consumer-oriented products to the Caribbean are on pace to set a new high in 2012. Consumer-oriented products account for over 60 percent of U.S. agricultural, fish and forestry exports to the Caribbean, with poultry, red meats, dairy products, snacks, and processed fruit and vegetables rounding out the top five export categories. In 2011, the United Stated also exported $38 million dollars worth of fish products to the region, which should reach a similar level in 2012. Competition from Europe, Canada, South and Central America is beginning to intensify in the Caribbean. While the United States enjoys several advantages in the region, U.S. suppliers should be mindful that they will have to work hard at capitalizing on opportunities in the Caribbean in the years to come. Author Defined: SECTION I. MARKET OVERVIEW The small economies of the Caribbean, which are highly vulnerable to any external shocks, have yet to fully regain their strength after the global economic recession curtailed tourist activity, dried up worker remittances, reduced foreign direct investment to the region, and softened demand for Caribbean exports. Beginning in 2010 the region began to show signs of economic recovery, but growth has been quite modest. High public debt, coupled with meager tourist and remittance inflows, are significant impediments to more robust growth. Overall economic well being in the Caribbean is intimately linked to the tourism sector. The vast majority of islands in the region rely heavily (some almost exclusively) on tourism as a source of income. Although several indicators point to modest improvements in Caribbean tourism performance, sluggish growth and high unemployment in the United States and Europe (the main sources of tourists for the Caribbean), are likely to result in a continuation of the slow growth trend for the sector. This lackluster growth does not necessarily spell bad news for U.S. suppliers, however. In fact, demand for U.S. foods remains as strong as ever. With an insufficient amount of arable land, scant water resources in some islands, no economies of scale, and a limited food-processing sector, the islands of the Caribbean must import the majority of their food needs. There is also the strong appeal of U.S. products among the 3.9 million local residents. This is primarily due to exposure to U.S. products through visits that many Caribbean citizens make to the United States and through U.S. television programming which is widely available throughout the region via satellite. Moreover, between six and seven million stop-over tourists (over half of which are from the United States) visit the Caribbean annually and help fuel demand for U.S. products in Caribbean food service outlets. Given these favorable conditions for U.S. exports, it is no surprise that the United States is the largest supplier of food products to the Caribbean. In 2011, the United States exported a record high $823 million worth of consumer-oriented products to the region, a 5 percent increase from the previous year’s record. Preliminary data indicate that U.S. exports of consumer-oriented products to the Caribbean are on pace to set a new high in 2012. Consumer-oriented products account for over 60 percent of U.S. agricultural, fish and forestry exports to the Caribbean, with poultry, red meats, dairy products, snacks, and processed fruit and vegetables rounding out the top five export categories. In 2011, the United Stated also exported $38 million dollars worth of fish products to the region, which should reach a similar level in 2012. U.S. Exports of Consumer-Oriented and Fish Products to the Caribbean (Millions of Dollars) Source: Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Statistics. Caribbean importers have a long history of doing business with the United States. Their strong interest in U.S. suppliers and products is mainly due to the following: close proximity, long-standing reputation of high quality products, and superior quality of service. In fact, many local importers have noted that they are able to source a variety of products from non-U.S. suppliers, but few of these suppliers can match their U.S. counterparts in terms of product quality and reliability. Advantages Challenges W In some markets, such as the French West Indies, a ith little arable land and food production, key constraint is breaking the traditional ties with the islands of the Caribbean must import most Europe. Chefs in many islands are European of their food needs. trained and thus prefer European products. Tourism continues to regain momentum and Caribbean economic well-being is highly remains a key factor in generating demand for U.S. produc dependent on tourism. Hence, economies remain ts, particularly in the food service very susceptible to factors that may disrupt tourism sector. The Caribbean is visited by (i.e. the world economy, terrorism, more active approximately six to seven million stop-over hurricane seasons, etc.). tourists annually. The United States is the source of over 50 Ocean transportation rates from the United States percent of all tourists visiting the region, can be more expensive than those from Europe. boosting demand for U.S. foods. Political interest in attaining “regional food Proximity and frequent transportation service security” or “food sovereignty” has strengthened in to the region work to the advantage of U.S. recent years, and many islands are actively suppliers. attempting to boost domestic production and diversify food supplies. The nature of individual island markets requires Exposure to US media as well as language, special effort from US exporters: dealing with cultural, and commercial ties with the United several small accounts; consolidation of small States all contribute to consumers having a orders; complying with different import positive attitude toward U.S. products. requirements for select products; ascertaining different market characteristics in every island. US exporters, particularly south Florida The 2008 trade agreement between the Caribbean consolidators, service the market very well and the EU has set the stage for increased and are in many ways better positioned to competition from Europe. CARICOM is also supply the Caribbean than competitors. negotiating a free trade agreement with Canada. The Other competitors are also targeting the Caribbean. United States has a dominant market The expansion of the Panama Canal, which is share in the vast majority of Caribbean expected to be completed in 2014, may open the islands (estimated at 55 percent overall). door to greater competition from Asia. The Certain products, particularly meat and poultry, regulatory environment at present is may be restricted in selected markets due to either fairly open to U.S. products. EU or island-specific restrictions. SECTION II. EXPORTER BUSINESS TIPS The best way for a U.S. supplier to enter the market with success is to first research the market for potential niches, and develop an effective marketing plan. In doing so, it is important to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of using an importer/wholesaler versus selling directly to different customers throughout the region. The decision will not be the same for all U.S. exporters. For instance, large U.S. suppliers with a dedicated sales force who can travel to the islands periodically to service their customers may find it advantageous to work directly with multiple retail and food service accounts throughout the islands. Exporters who are not able to do so will find it easier to work with an importer/wholesaler in a particular island. The latter is, in fact, the easiest and preferred method for most U.S. exporters. In general, Caribbean buyers rely heavily on consolidators, particularly those located in South Florida, for shipment of mixed container-loads to their local ports. As a result, a crucial part of doing business with Caribbean importers, is building a relationship with a consolidator in South Florida, and sometimes in New Jersey for purposes of shipping to Bermuda. Since some large resorts and chain supermarkets often order larger shipments directly from suppliers, the main resource for medium to smaller sized retail and food service businesses are local importer/wholesalers, making them a good target for smaller U.S. exporters. These importers/wholesalers will work with prospective U.S. suppliers to find the best means of product delivery, and meeting local standards and regulations. Local importers will usually stay informed of changing regulations and duties on food and beverage products. In most islands, food safety responsibilities fall under the Ministry of Public Health or its equivalent. The Ministry of Agriculture may also play a role with plant and animal products both in terms of public health and in terms of plant and animal health. Meat and poultry, dairy products, seafood, and produce typically require import approval and health/country of origin certification. For example, phytosanitary certificates from the country of origin must accompany imported fresh produce and plants. Health certificates must accompany live animals and animal products. Certain items may be restricted if the government decides they pose a risk to food safety or plant and animal health. It is always a good idea for U.S. exporters to verify that their product is eligible for entry into a particular island prior to shipping. Most Caribbean countries follow international standards (e.g. Codex Alimentarius standards) and fully accept U.S. standards for food and agricultural products, including the standard U.S. nutritional fact panel. However, U.S. suppliers must be aware that EU standards may apply for some EU Member State territories in the Caribbean. The French overseas departments of Guadeloupe & Martinique are a case in point, as they require food and beverage products to be labeled in French and to comply with EU norms. In general, enforcement of labeling and other product standards is carried out mostly at the port of entry, but routine and random checks at the retail and wholesale levels are also conducted. As always, good communication with local importers will help to ensure proper compliance with local food laws. More information on Caribbean Basin import requirements can be found in the Food and Agricultural Import Regulations and Standards (FAIRS) Reports for the following countries: Aruba, The Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, and Trinidad and Tobago. SECTION III. MARKET SECTOR STRUCTURE AND TRENDS A. HRI Food Service Sector As mentioned earlier, tourism is expected to remain sluggish for the foreseeable future. However, one positive development is the considerable investment in tourism infrastructure that has taken place in recent years, which certainly strengthens the long term potential of the hotel, restaurant, and institutional (HRI) food service sector. One such investment is the Baha Mar Project in The Bahamas, which is being billed as the largest resort development currently under construction in North America and the largest single-phase resort development in the history of the Caribbean. The $2.6 billion, 1,000 acre development will be located 5 miles west of Nassau along a half mile stretch known as Cable Beach. Construction of the project is well underway and is expected to be completed in late 2014. When finished, Baha Mar will include six new resort hotels, the Caribbean’s largest casino, The Bahamas’ largest convention center, and at least 12 new restaurants among other attractions. Bahamian tourism and demand for U.S. foods are expected to increase accordingly. For more information see the following GAIN report: Tourism Development Spells Good News for U.S. Suppliers. Overall, the Caribbean HRI food service sector accounts for 40 to 45 percent of consumer-related agricultural imports. The percentage of Caribbean hotels and restaurants that are independently owned varies from approximately 90 percent in Grenada to 25 percent in The Bahamas (Nassau in particular). This characteristic impacts the flow of imports to the island. The independently-owned restaurant or hotel is more likely to source its food and beverage products from local importers/wholesalers, while larger chain restaurants and hotels have both the connections and the economies of scale to also make direct imports from U.S. suppliers. While corporate-owned resorts and hotels have boomed over recent years, independently- owned food service businesses are still strong on all Caribbean islands. Local independently-owned restaurants remain especially popular in countries such as Aruba, Barbados, Bermuda, and Sint Maarten/St. Martin. Some of the world’s most acclaimed chefs are working in the Caribbean. Using high quality ingredients, these chefs and their restaurants often are a valuable platform for U.S. food and beverage products. However, many chefs are European-trained and thus breaking their preference toward European products can be challenging. Heightened interest of chefs in the use of locally produced ingredients is a recent trend, similar to other parts of the world. For more information on this sector, see the following GAIN HRI food service sector reports for the Caribbean Basin: Trinidad and Tobago (2012), The Bahamas (2011), Bermuda (2010), Eastern Caribbean (2009), Netherlands Antilles (2008). B. Retail Sector About 55 to 60 percent of consumer-related agricultural imports in the Caribbean are destined for the retail sector. Most of the products stocked on the shelves of Caribbean retail stores are imported. As in the HRI sector, smaller retailers such as neighborhood ‘mom and pop’ stores will buy most if not all of their products from local import wholesalers. These retailers have a slower turnaround on product sales and have limited space for storage, which both lead to wholesale as a preferred option for sourcing food and beverage products. In contrast, supermarket chains often have both local and U.S. or foreign-based purchasing offices. They work closely with U.S. suppliers to find the best prices for products of interest. Again, a consolidator in South Florida is still crucial to the equation in this market segment. International retail chains in the Caribbean include: PriceSmart (U.S.), Cost-U-Less (U.S.), Save-A-Lot (U.S.), Carrefour (France), and Albert Heijn Zeelandia (Holland). While these retail outlets do quite well, 'mom and pop' stores will continue to supply a large share of consumers’ needs for basic supplies. In addition, national and international convenience stores and gas marts play a small but growing role in consumer food purchases, contributing about five percent of total retail food sales. An interesting market niche in the retail sector is yacht provisioning. Yachters (or ‘yachtees’ as they are known in some islands) often phone or fax in their orders to harbor stores or may venture into town to visit the local supermarkets who cater to their specific needs. This is especially prevalent in the British Virgin Islands, Antigua and Barbuda, and Trinidad and Tobago. For more information on this sector, see the following GAIN retail sector reports for the Caribbean Basin: Trinidad and Tobago (2012), The Bahamas (2011), Bermuda (2010), Eastern Caribbean (2009), and the Dutch Caribbean (2008). C. Food Processing Sector Food processing in the broad Caribbean Basin is highly concentrated in the larger countries such as the Dominican Republic and Jamaica. In the CBATO’s islands of coverage, which have very limited food production and practically no economies of scale, food processing is much less prevalent. In fact, bulk and intermediate agricultural products account for only a quarter of U.S. agricultural exports to the CBATO islands. Nonetheless, there is processing of wheat flour, pasta products, rice, bakery products, soy products, dairy products, and animal feeds in some countries, particularly in Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados. Food processors within the region buy roughly 20 percent of raw materials and food ingredients from local suppliers and import 80 percent from international suppliers. SECTION IV. BEST CONSUMER ORIENTED PRODUCT PROSPECTS Market Opportunities exist for practically all high-value, consumer-oriented foods/beverages and seafood products in the Caribbean Basin. Some of the most prominent growth categories include: Product 2011 2011 5-Yr. Import Key Constraints Over Market Category Market Imports* Avg. Tariff Market Development Attractiveness Size* ($1,000) Annual Rate** for USA (Volume) Import Growth* Snack Min. Local 81,364 10% 0-20% The retail market is As with most Foods Production still a niche market, consumer- subject to the health oriented of the economy. The products, demand HRI mkt. depends on should continue tourism. strong, albeit tempered by overall economic conditions. Red Meats, Min. Local 106,386 13% 0-40% The retail market is As with most fresh, Production still a niche market, consumer- chilled & subject to the health oriented frozen of the economy. The products, demand HRI mkt. depends on should continue tourism. strong, albeit tempered by overall economic conditions. Dairy Min. Local 90,001 13% 0-20% The retail market is Attractive to U.S. Products Production still a niche market, suppliers with subject to the health market driven of the economy. The approach to HRI mkt. depends on business in the tourism. Caribbean. Processed Min. Local 49,390 4% 0-20% The retail market is As with most Fruit & Production still a niche market, consumer- Vegetables subject to the health oriented of the economy. The products, demand HRI mkt. depends on should continue tourism. strong, albeit tempered by overall economic conditions. Fruit & Min. Local 45,012 8% 0-20% Some domestic As with most Vegetable Production production in select consumer- Juices islands (i.e. Trinidad oriented & Tobago, products, demand Barbados). The retail should continue mkt. is subject to the strong, albeit health of the tempered by economy. The HRI overall economic mkt. depends on conditions. tourism. Poultry Min. Local 135,353 11% 0-40% Some domestic As with most Meat Production in most production in select consumer- islands islands (i.e. Trinidad oriented & Tobago, products, demand Barbados). The retail should continue mkt. is subject to the strong, albeit health of the tempered by economy. The HRI overall economic mkt. depends on conditions. tourism. A possible increase in CARICOM’s common external tariff for poultry products could become a major constraint for U.S. suppliers. *Total market size data is unavailable. Imports and average annual import growth are based on U.S. export data from the U.S. Bureau of the Census trade data. **Applied import duties and competing imports may vary from country to country in the Caribbean. SECTION V. KEY CONTACTS AND FURTHER INFORMATION A. For more information, please contact: Caribbean Basin Agricultural Trade Office Foreign Agricultural Service United States Department of Agriculture 909 SE 1st Ave, Suite 720 Miami, Florida 33131 Phone: (305) 536-5300 Fax: (305) 536-7577 Email: atocaribbeanbasin@fas.usda.gov Web: www.cbato.fas.usda.gov Katherine Nishiura, Director Email: katherine.nishiura@fas.usda.gov Omar González, Agricultural Marketing Specialist Email: omar.gonzalez@fas.usda.gov Graciela Juelle, Agricultural Marketing Assistant Email: grace.juelle@fas.usda.gov B. Useful U.S. Government Websites: Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), USDA This site provides extensive information on FAS programs and services, trade statistics, market research, trade shows and events, and much more. http://www.fas.usda.gov Caribbean Basin Agricultural Trade Office (CBATO), FAS/USDA The CBATO website offers information on services available to U.S. exporters in the Caribbean, promotional activities, market research and more. http://www.cbato.fas.usda.gov US Department of Commerce This is the U.S. Government’s Export Portal, which provides a wealth of information on services and programs available to U.S. exporters. Comprehensive Country Commercial Guides are available for select markets through the portal’s Market Research Library (under the Opportunities tab click on ‘Market Research’ and then on ‘Market Research Library’). http://www.export.gov US Department of State This site provides country fact sheets as well as valuable information on travel & business in foreign countries and on U.S. Embassies and Consulates around the world. http://www.state.gov Central Intelligence Agency The CIA’s on-line World Factbook provides useful and up-to-date guides for practically every country in the world. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/ C. Other Useful Sources of Information (Non-U.S. Government): The websites listed below are provided for the readers’ convenience; USDA does NOT in any way endorse, guarantee the accuracy of, or necessarily concur with the information contained in these websites. CARICOM (Caribbean Community) http://www.caricom.org Caribbean Hotel & Tourism Association (CHTA) http://www.caribbeanhotelassociation.com Caribbean Tourism Organization http://www.onecaribbean.org APPENDIX I. STATISTICS The following statistics were obtained from several sources. Many sources of statistical information were consulted due to the widespread nature of the Caribbean Basin Agricultural Trade Office’s islands of coverage. Some variations, depending on the agency compiling data, will exist in the tables provided. TABLE A. KEY CARIBBEAN BASIN TRADE & DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION Agricultural Imports From All Countries ($Mil) / U.S. Market Share (%) 2,214.8/58.4% 1/ Consumer Food Imports From All Countries ($Mil) / U.S. Market Share 1,436.8/58.9% (%) 1/ Edible Fishery Imports From All Countries ($Mil) / U.S. Market Share 94.8/44.6% (%) 1/ Total Population (Millions 2/) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 3.9 /Range: -0.09 to 3.2% Urban Population (Millions 2/) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 1.8/Range:0.2 to 2.4% Number of Major Metropolitan Areas 3/ 0 Size of the Middle Class (Millions) / Growth Rate (%) N/A Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (ppp, U.S. Dollars) Range: $3,400 to $69,900 Unemployment Rate (%) Range: 4.5 to 25.7 % Per Capita Food Expenditures (U.S. Dollars) N/A Percent of Female Population Employed 4/ Range: 26.5% to 59.4% Exchange Rate (US$1 = Caribbean country’s currency) Varies by Country Footnotes: 1/ 2010 estimate based on available Global Trade Atlas data for Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, The Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & The Grenadines, and Trinidad & Tobago. 2/ 2012 mid-year estimates. 3/ Populations in excess of 1,000,000 4/ Refers to female population employed as a percentage of total female population. Source: CIA World Factbook, Global Trade Atlas, and Euromonitor. TABLE B. CONSUMER FOOD AND EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCT IMPORTS (Thousands of U.S. Dollars) 2011 2012 2009 2010 2011 (Jan - (Jan - Oct) Oct) Consumer Oriented Total 739,585 782,066 823,350 670,093 718,640 Poultry Meat 115,353 126,724 135,353 107,847 114,870 Other Consumer Oriented 123,789 118,427 113,740 94,594 105,217 Red Meats, FR/CH/FR 85,732 96,857 106,386 84,358 87,702 Dairy Products 74,714 78,411 90,001 74,176 74,336 Snack Foods 75,032 80,008 81,364 67,425 78,706 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 38,208 46,653 49,390 40,759 45,313 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 37,914 44,667 45,012 37,284 36,197 Wine and Beer 33,273 34,512 35,827 29,553 33,180 Fresh Fruit 31,766 26,626 29,019 22,598 24,468 Pet Foods 29,629 27,769 26,880 22,107 26,238 Fresh Vegetables 20,831 24,038 25,929 20,468 16,630 Breakfast Cereals 21,759 23,895 25,600 21,619 25,899 Eggs & Products 17,106 19,441 20,712 16,973 17,816 Red Meats, Prep/Pres 16,498 17,127 18,026 14,224 15,678 Nursery Products 11,323 9,591 11,249 8,759 8,966 Tree Nuts 6,658 7,320 8,862 7,169 7,424 Fish Products 36,532 38,576 37,754 30,944 30,513 Other Edible Fish & Seafood 31,472 33,631 32,017 26,272 26,330 Salmon Whole or Eviscerated 1,087 1,740 2,294 1,977 1,243 Salmon Canned 1,963 1,440 1,586 1,279 1,537 Crab & Meat 1,287 1,253 1,248 977 1,073 Roe & Urchin (Fish Eggs) 723 511 609 439 323 Surimi (Fish Paste) 0 0 0 0 8 TOTAL 776,117 820,642 861,105 701,037 749,154 Note: Trade data for approximately half of the Caribbean Basin countries are unavailable from the UN Trade database and other private databases either because the reporting countries have not reported the data or simply because the data do not exist. Therefore, the above table is based on U.S. export data only. Overall U.S. market share is estimated at 55 percent, ranging from single digits in the French Antilles to as much as 94 percent in The Bahamas. Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census Trade Data. TABLE C. TOP 15 SUPPLIERS OF CONSUMER FOODS & EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS Consumer-Oriented Agricultural Imports*, US$ Partner 2009 2010 World 1,387,800,981 1,436,758,082 United States 824,864,022 845,964,480 Netherlands 61,157,564 61,841,049 New Zealand 44,244,773 60,387,337 Trinidad & Tobago 48,513,044 49,774,309 Canada 37,869,811 46,618183 Brazil 34,841,701 34,397,308 United Kingdom 32,971,707 34,180,723 Costa Rica 24,232,444 24,292,711 Ireland 22,353,455 18,144,332 Jamaica 16,905,554 16,443,489 St. Lucia 14,088,440 14,603,521 France 14,730,836 14,409,197 Argentina 14,432,459 13,807,859 Australia 12,926,533 13,754,885 Chile 12,939,537 12,868,580 * Import data for all Caribbean Basin countries are not available. Data in the above table are for Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, The Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago. Source: Global Trade Atlas. Fish & Seafood Product Imports*, US$ Partner 2009 2010 World 96,756,317 94,737,071 United States 42,696,933 42,248,921 Canada 18,639,780 18,118,293 Thailand 6,631,686 6,781,053 Guyana 4,890,037 5,019,771 Suriname 4,099,833 4,103,907 Norway 2,404,306 2,673,356 Trinidad & Tobago 1,738,095 1,962,703 Belize 887,149 1,504,281 Vietnam 1,077,685 1,484,931 Panama 1,263,793 1,091,726 Chile 1,926,959 1,083,077 United Kingdom 976,864 931,288 St. Vincent & the Grenadines 870,716 810,303 Other Asia N.E.S. 2,736,193 606,108 Costa Rica 580,064 427,402 * Import data for all Caribbean Basin countries are not available. Data in the above table are for Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, The Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago. Source: Global Trade Atlas.
Posted: 11 January 2013

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