2013 US Import Opportunities From Mexico

An Expert's View about Economic Trends/Outlook in Mexico

Posted on: 30 Apr 2013

Internal market research identifying the top Mexico export opportunities for the US market.

U.S. Imports from Mexico in 2013 Prepared exclusively for Axia Capital by Elizabeth Helsley/Global Luxe December 23, 2012 Table of Contents Background ............................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Overview of Mexico’s Exports and Free Trade Agreements ................................................................................................. 4 Produce ................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Non-Organic ........................................................................................................................................................................ 5 Organic ............................................................................................................................................................................ 6 Alcohol ................................................................................................................................................................................. 7-9 Apparel & Footwear ........................................................................................................................................................ 10-11 Food Products .................................................................................................................................................................. 12-13 Handicrafts & Home Decor .................................................................................................................................................. 14 Sources .................................................................................................................................................................................. 15 2 BACKGROUND In response to request for information on export opportunities for Mexican companies, using a number of different resources combined with first hand market knowledge, Global Luxe has put together this report examining the most promising export sectors for 2013. The main findings of the research are: ξ Mexico’s number of free trade agreements allows it to trade with 44 countries. ξ Mexico’s exports to all countries increased 475% between 1994 and 2011, from $60.8 billion USD to $349.6 billion USD. ξ The United States, due to its proximity and market size, offers the best options for Mexican exporters and should be considered as a first choice (80% of Mexico’s exports go to the US). ξ In the US food and beverage sector, the explosive growth of the Hispanic population combined with the percentage of income allocated to food, is a tremendous opportunity for Mexican companies. ξ For those companies looking to expand their reach beyond the United States, Canada is a great choice. While the Hispanic population is small in comparison to the United States, there is a growing demand for Mexican products. Canada has the 2nd largest population of Mexicans living abroad, only behind the United States. ξ When it comes to produce, Mexico is in a unique position as one of the few countries that has a year round growing season. ξ The designation of origin status of both tequila and mezcal and the government’s efforts to standardize the industry make the alcoholic beverages promising exports for years to come. 3 OVERVIEW OF MEXICO’S EXPORTS AND FREE TRADE AGREEMENTS 4 PRODUCE (ORGANIC & NON-ORGANIC) Thanks to its variety of microclimates and fertile soil, Mexico has one of the longest growing seasons in the world. The seasonality allows Mexico to supply the rest of the world with fruits and vegetables on a year round basis. The majority of Mexico’s produce is destined for the United States, while the rest goes to Canada, Europe and Japan. In 1990, 90% of Mexico’s agricultural and fishing exports went to the United States, while in 2010 the number dropped to 77%, showing a diversification of markets and new territories. Agriculture contributes 8 percent to Mexico’s gross domestic product (GDP) and employs about 22 percent of the labor force (about 8 million workers). Non-organic 2011 was a record year for Mexican produce exports which were estimated to be valued at $22 Billion USD. The number of exports in 2011 was 50% higher than in 2007. Mexico has made a great effort to enter new markets like Russia, Singapore and Israel and expand its global reach. Overall, Mexico agricultural exports have increased around an average of 11.5% per year since NAFTA was signed. Mexican exports to Canada increased by 8.9% from 2010 to 2011. The most exported products were tomatoes, fresh peppers, raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries. Avocados saw a huge increase, with a 40.8% year over year increase. 5 Organic It is estimated that nearly 85% of Mexico’s organic produce is exported, while 15% is sold within Mexico. In the past few years, there has been a growing demand for organic produce in the national market, but nowhere near the demand in foreign markets. The United States and the European Union make up 97% of the world’s organic market. The demand in these regions continues to grow. Many European governments have established rules that by 2020 a certain percentage, in some cases up to 20%, of all food turnover must be organic. There are two main types of organic producers in Mexico: small scale and large scale. The smaller scale producers are typically indigenous people, who have an average land of 2.25 hectares, and depend on local co-ops for certification purposes and assistance with the commercial side of the business. Although they may be considered “small scale”, they make up 98% percent of growers and have 84% of the organic surface area. Large scale producers typically have anywhere from 100 to 2,000 hectares and are independently owned and operated. In order for a product to be certified organic, it must be certified by Certimex or another international certification agency with offices in Mexico, such as Naturland, Imo, Bioagricert, or OCIA. Mexico’s most significant organic export crop is coffee, which represents 66% of total organic exports. The main coffee producing regions in Mexico are Chiapas, Oaxaca, and Veracruz. Other top organic exports from Mexico are: mango, oranges, apples, papaya, avocado, soy, banana, cacao, vanilla, honey, pineapple, chaya, achiote, maguey, and beans. KEY AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY: Organic: Coffee, mango, banana, chia, hibiscus, cacao, avocado, coconut, citrus fruits, papaya, and exotic fruits. Non-Organic: Avocados, berries, Persian lime, watermelon, chile, tomatoes, onion, grapes, cucumbers, Niche markets: papaya, asparagus, mango, broccoli, eggplant, cantaloupe 6 ALCOHOL The export market for tequila is one of Mexico’s biggest, with a value of $750 Million USD annually. In 2011, Mexico produced 261 Million liters of tequila. In the past decade, Mexico’s tequila production was primarily “mixto” which is alcohol made of an agave derivative, but as consumer’s tastes around the world have become more refined; the demand for 100% agave tequila has increased. Fake tequila is still a problem, as the National Regulatory Council of Tequila has found over 400 pirated brands of tequila-like alcohol around the world. Tequila falls under the regulation of the designation of origin, much like champagne, and can only be made in Jalisco, Zacatecas, Guanajuato, Michoacán, and Nayarit. 7 The tequila industry in Mexico is getting help from the Mexican government in the form of a new regulation: NOM 006. The new norm establishes a formal procedure for obtaining official certification as a tequila distiller or bottler. In addition to the process for obtaining official certification, the norm also lays down new ground rules for labeling, which will allow consumers to readily identify real tequila made with agave vs. cheaper knock offs. According to Casa Noble Tequila president and COO David Ravandi "Tequila is entering a stage of consolidation in the world markets. It is no longer a fad. The fact that 100% agave Tequila exports have increased tremendously over the last two years is extremely positive for the product's outlook in the years to come." Mezcal is also subject to destination of origin standards and can only be produced in Oaxaca, Tamaulipas, Durango, Guanajuato and Guerrero. Unlike tequila, mezcal can only be exported in bottles, which ensures its authenticity. In 2005, there were only 13 certified mezcal brands and in 2012 that number jumped to 103. The demand for exotic spirits around the world has contributed to the boom in Mexico. According to the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture, mezcal exports have increased 120% in the last six years and are now valued at $60 Million USD annually. While Mexico is known around the world for its tequilas, its wines are also quickly gaining popularity in international markets. Baja California Norte, produces the majority of Mexico’s wines (90%) with the remainder coming from Coahuila, Durango, and Queretaro. A number of sub regions exist within Baja California Norte: the Valle de Guadalupe, Calafia, San Vicente, and Santo Tomas. There are approximately 111,000 acres of vineyards in Mexico and they are expanding at a rate of 6% per year. The Mexican government is incentivizing wineries to export, offering substantial tax breaks to those who send their goods abroad. 8 The strongest players in the Mexican wine market are L.A. Cetto and Domecq. The two companies account for 80% of Mexico’s annual wine production of 1.6 Million cases, and of that amount nearly 40% is exported to other countries. Europe is the primary destination for Mexican wine as they purchase around 50% of Mexico’s exports, followed by the United States at 35%, and the rest is divided among a number of other countries. KEY AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY: Tequila, flavored tequila drinks (i.e. coffee tequila), mezcal, agave fiber, agave syrup. The US is the lead importer of tequila and the market is demanding higher quality tequila and “boutique” tequila brands. Europe is not a very sophisticated market, as the majority of tequila imported is actually a mixture. 9 APPAREL & FOOTWEAR The rise of China as a force in the apparel market over the past decade has no doubt affected the Mexican garment industry, but Mexico has something that China will never have: proximity to the United States. In 2000, Mexico was the United States’ largest apparel supplier, but dropped to the 6th largest in 2010. Recent indicators show that as wages rise in China, more US companies are once again looking at Mexico as a viable option. In 2011, Mexico’s apparel exports to the US were valued at $3.8 Billion USD, a 7.4% year over year increase. Around 95% of Mexico’s total apparel exports are destined for the United States. Mexico’s biggest competitors in the US apparel market are China, Vietnam, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The apparel manufacturing sector in Mexico exports to over 60 countries and has quadrupled the number of export goods per category in the past 15 years according to CANAINTEX. In order to compete in an increasingly difficult market, Mexican apparel manufacturers are expanding their product base, producing shorter runs, and focusing on higher quality. Another way manufacturers are adding value is through their full package or turnkey solutions, where they offer clients everything from design to labeling to export. Mexico Fits, a joint initiative between CANAIVE, the Mexican Chamber of Apparel Manufacturers, and various government entities was launched in 2009 as a means to promote Mexican apparel exports. The Mexican government has also set up design centers and invested in high tech manufacturing equipment so that Mexican manufacturers can add value to their production lines. 10 The majority of Mexico’s shoe exports go to the United States and Mexico is the 9th largest leather goods and shoe supplier in the world. The country has over 8,000 shoe manufacturers, with the majority of shoes coming from the state of Guanajuato. In 2010, Mexico shoe exports were valued at $325.6 Million USD. The major importers of Mexican shoes are the US, Canada, Brazil, Panama, Colombia, Spain, Guatemala, Japan, and Cuba. The shoe industry in Mexico has been hard hit by a worldwide influx of Chinese shoes, making it virtually impossible to compete on price. The Footwear manufacturing associations have lobbied the Mexican government to impose restrictions on Chinese shoes, but as of 2011, the punitive tariffs on Chinese shoes disappeared. KEY AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY: Retailers and companies in general in the United States are shying away from large production runs, so Mexico offers a great alternative to China when it comes to smaller runs. Mexican manufacturers can ship and have goods in US cities within 2 to 3 days, a tremendous advantage over Asian suppliers. Fast fashion – inexpensive, trendy apparel for juniors T shirts - screen-printing Men’s suits –cashmere/wool, wide variety of fabrics. Mexico is the 2nd largest supplier in volume of men’s suits to the US. Men’s and boy’s trousers, men’s and boy’s man made fabric knit shirts Denim – Mexico has long been one of the leading players in the denim market, and now hopes to gain ground in Europe and compete with Turkey. Shoes – Short production runs for overseas buyers, divided or full grain leathers, crust leather, cow leather, boots and short boots (booties), rubber sole shoes, sandals, industrial shoes, upper parts, children’s shoes, cowboy boots, and women’s dress shoes 11 FOOD PRODUCTS According to the 2010 census, there are currently over 50 million Hispanics in the United States, representing 16.3% of the population. The Hispanic population in the US has grown 43% since the year 2000, making it one of the largest minority groups in the nation. It is estimated that 19 million are of Mexican origin. The states with the highest Hispanic population are: California, Texas, New Mexico, Illinois and Arizona. In 2050, 30% of the population, or 1 out of every 4 people living in the United States will be of Hispanic descent. The up and coming minority group has a purchasing power of $1 Billion USD (2010 Census figures) and is set to reach $1.3 Billion USD by 2015. Canada also has a growing Hispanic population and is home to over 50,000 Mexicans, making it the number two spot for Mexicans living outside of Mexico. Data gathered from a study by the Latinum Network shows that Hispanics are the most important growth driver in the food, beverage and restaurant sectors. In 2015, they will represent 12% of all food and beverages purchases in the United States. It is important to note that this figure does not include undocumented Hispanics. A study from Oklahoma State University found that Hispanics in the United States spend the more of their income on food than any other group, around $128 USD per week, versus $91 USD for non-Hispanics. They also go to the supermarket twice as much as non-Hispanics, an average of 4.7 times per week. In order for brands to have success selling to Hispanics in the US, labeling must be in English and Spanish. The United States is the main destination for Mexico’s tortillas, with 70% of the export market. The tortilla exports to the United States are significant – they represent around 1/3 of Mexico’s national consumption. Maseca has a lock on the tortilla market, as 70% of the raw materials used to make tortillas are supplied by the company. It is estimated that for the 2012-13 season tortilla imports in the United States will grow by 28%. 12 KEY AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY: United States/Canada: Tuna, seafood, tortillas, cajeta, canned chiles, dried chiles, soups, vanilla, candy, beans, fruit preserves, cookies, guacamole (frozen and or powdered), marmalade, honey, mole, hot sauces, tomato puree, canned vegetables, fruit nectars, vegetable juices, snacks, sugar, cereals, frozen Mexican food, nopales, European Union: tortilla chips, sliced jalapenos, nopales, tostadas, beans, frozen foods (jalapenos, tacos, quesadillas, enchiladas), tortillas, sauces/spices 13 HANDICRAFTS & HOME DECOR The Secretary of Economy in Mexico has launched a program in Mexico in order to encourage small businesses to export Mexican handicrafts. The goal is to export over 1 Million units in 2013. The key markets for export of Mexican handicrafts are the US, Canada, Spain, Colombia, Germany, Italy and Australia. European markets tend to pay a premium for handicrafts, due to the lack of availability and the “novelty” of the items. Mexican handicraft exports are endless, as Mexico has a wide variety of handicrafts and home décor. Export opportunities exist for manufacturers to sell directly to retailers (i.e., Cost Plus), importers, distributors, online retailers, and interior designers. One of the biggest advantages of Mexican handicrafts is the lack of requirements to export, compared to other items like organic produce. KEY AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY: Blown glass products, religious products, candles, Christmas ornaments, picture frames, wooden furniture, wrought iron designs, silver jewelry, amber jewelry, costume jewelry, pewter, ceramics, textiles, baskets, clay pottery, talavera, copper products 14 SOURCES ISTMO – http://www.istmo.mx Star Chefs - http://www.starchefs.com/ Consejo Regulador de Tequila - http://www.crt.org.mx/ SAGARPA - http://www.sagarpa.gob.mx/Paginas/default.aspx Fresh Plaza – http://www.freshplaza.es ProMexico – http://www.promexico.gob.mx FONAES - http://www.inaes.gob.mx/ (Changed to INAES under new Peña Nieto administration) FONART - http://www.fonart.gob.mx/web/index.php Secretaria de Economia - http://www.economia.gob.mx/ INEGI - http://www.inegi.org.mx/ Bancomext - http://www.bancomext.com/Bancomext/secciones/home.html 15
Posted: 30 April 2013

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