Exporter Guide

An Expert's View about Food , Beverages and Tobacco in Belgium

Last updated: 11 Jul 2011

This report provides information about food and agricultural export opportunities to Benelux countries (Belgium, Netherland, and Luxembourg).

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 6/13/2011 GAIN Report Number: NL1008 Netherlands Exporter Guide Exporting to the Netherlands and Belgium Approved By: Paul Spencer Prepared By: Marcel Pinckaers Report Highlights: This report provides information about food and agricultural export opportunities to Benelux countries (Belgium, Netherland, and Luxembourg). Post: The Hague Section 1. Market Overview Macroeconomic Situation and Trends The Netherlands: Because of the country?s strategic location on the North Sea and the Rhine, trade and distribution are ingrained into Dutch culture and economy. The Port of Rotterdam is among the most important sea ports in the world. Amsterdam Schiphol Airport occupies a similar position in Europe. Their geographic location and function as international hubs in Europe are seen as a major advantage. The ports of Rotterdam and Amsterdam have outstanding infrastructure and logistics services. The Dutch are business people. The population is highly educated, internationally oriented and largely multilingual. In February 2011, the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) forecast that Dutch GDP will grow by 1.75 percent in 2011, compared to 1.7 percent in 2010. In 2012 the economy is expected to continue fragile growth of 1.5 percent. The export of goods, an essential element of the Dutch economy, recovered rapidly from the recession with a growth of 12.7 percent in 2010, after a dramatic drop of 9.2 percent in 2009. However, the pace of recovery is expected to slow down to 7.25 percent in 2011 and 5.25 in 2012. Unemployment will gradually start to decrease from 4.5 percent in 2010 to 4.25 percent in 2011 and 4 percent in 2012. Inflation is expected to increase from 1.3 percent in 2010 to 2 percent in 2011 and 2012. Purchasing power has been impacted by the recent economic downturn and creeping inflation, declining from -0.4 percent in 2010 to an expected -0.75 percent in 2011 and 2012. Figure 1: Key Data Dutch Economy 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011* Economic Growth % 3.3 3.5 2.0 -4.0 1.7 1.8 Inflation (HIPC) % 1.7 1.6 2.5 1.3 1.3 2.0 Unemployment % 5.5 4.5 3.9 5.0 4.5 4.3 GDP (billion) ?535 ?569 ?596 ?574 ?584 ?594 Source: Central Bureau of Statistics/Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis * ECON/FAS The Hague forecast Belgium: The National Bank of Belgium (NBB) stresses that Belgian unemployment figures have weathered the economic crisis somewhat better than most other EU member states. Belgian unemployment is currently at 8.4 percent, compared to 10 percent in the Eurozone. Economic growth in 2010 amounted to 2 percent, against 1.7 percent in the Eurozone. It was mainly driven by a 20 percent growth in exports and higher household consumption. Similar to the situation in the Netherlands, the Belgians spend around 15 percent of their total spending on food. Figure 2: Key Data Belgian Economy 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011* Economic Growth % 3.0 2.8 1.0 -1.5 2.0 1.9 Inflation (CPI) % 2.3 1.8 4.5 -0.1 2.2 2.1 Unemployment % 8.3 7.5 7.0 7.9 8.4 8.3 GDP (billion) ?319 ?320 ?326 ?321 ?327 ?334 Source: www.nbb.be * FAS The Hague forecast Benelux Importers Key in US Exports to the EU-27 Total US exports of agricultural, fish and forestry products increased by 18% in 2010 to $127 billion. With almost $11 billion, exports to the EU-27 grew by 18% and accounted for almost 9 percent of total U.S. agricultural exports. US Exports seem to be on the road to recovery. The main focus of this report is on Consumer-Oriented and Fish products. The EU continues to be an important market and 9% of all exported U.S. Consumer-Oriented products end up in this market. The importance of the EU for U.S. seafood exports is even greater: a quarter of U.S. seafood exports were sold on the EU market in 2010. Figure 3: US Exports Of Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Products, by Destination (in million USD) 2010 World EU-27 Benelux % of EU Bulk products 47,209 2,337 457 20% Intermediate products 23,181 2,462 594 24% Consumer Oriented products 45,419 4,095 1,166 28% Forest products 6,853 956 123 13% Fish and Seafood products 4,193 1,010 201 20% Total 126,855 10,860 2,541 23% Source: www.fas.usda.gov (BICO reports) After a decline in 2009, US exports of agricultural, fish and forestry products to the EU-27 are up by 15 percent in 2010. Although soybeans, tree nuts and fish products continue to be the largest product groups, fruit & vegetable juices, pulses, and fresh fruit are gaining market share. More details on these figures can be downloaded on http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats/BicoReport.aspx?type=country The Benelux are (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) within the EU-27 and are an excellent market for U.S. products. Benelux countries account for almost a quarter of all EU-27 imports of US agricultural, fish and forestry products. Figure 4: US Exports Of Consumer-Oriented Agricultural And Fish & Seafood Products to the Benelux countries Source: www.fas.usda.gov (BICO reports) Key Developments and the Impact on Consumer Buying Habits The Benelux has almost 28 million inhabitants and is the most densely populated region in the EU, with 412 people per square kilometer. More than two-thirds of its slowly growing population lives in a 130 mile corridor stretching from Amsterdam to Brussels. Over the past decades, more and more women have entered the labor force. This has resulted in double- income households who place a premium on time. Double income households are willing to pay for convenience, variety, and health in food. As a result they are purchasing more meal components and ready-to-eat products but this group is also experimenting more with ethnic cuisines and new food concepts. Another development driving changes in consumer buying habits is the on-going trend towards smaller households. There are some 12 million households with an average size of 2.3 people. Single and two person households are growing and households of four or more are declining. Not only does this trend demand smaller food portions, industry contacts also claim that these consumers tend to buy more expensive, value-added products or meal components. The Benelux population is graying as the 0-20 age group is declining and the 65+ age group is growing rapidly. It is worth noting that the 65+ age group has a relatively high purchasing power since, in general, they live in paid-off houses and benefit from good pensions and retirement benefits. Figure 5: Key Demographic Figures For The Benelux 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Population, in millions 26.8 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 Number of Households, in millions 11.7 11.9 12 12.1 12.4 Household Size 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.25 Source: CBS, Statbel Figure 6: Dutch Population By Age Group, In Percentage Year 0 ? 19 20 ? 39 40 ? 64 65 ? 79 80+ Total Population 1963 38.1 26.4 26.1 7.9 1.5 11,889,962 1973 35.0 29.0 25.6 8.6 1.8 13,387,623 1983 29.7 32.6 26.0 9.4 2.4 14,339,551 1993 24.6 32.9 29.5 10.0 3.0 15,239,182 2003 24.5 28.6 33.2 10.4 3.4 16,192,572 2010 23.7 25.3 35.7 11.4 3.9 16,574,989 Source: CBS Figure 7: Main Non-Dutch Population, By Ethnicity 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Indonesian 393,057 389,940 387,124 384,497 381,500* Turkish 364,333 368,600 372,852 378,330 383,957 Surinamese 331,890 333,504 335,679 338,678 342,279 Moroccan 323,239 329,493 335,208 341,528 349,005 Former NLs Antilles & Aruba 129,683 129,965 131,387 134,774 138,420 Source: CBS, * FAS The Hague estimate Figure 8: Advantages And Challenges US Products Face In The Benelux Advantages Challenges Affluent and open-minded consumers Saturated markets Highly developed infrastructure Transatlantic transportation is costly Trade history and mentality and takes time Strong interest in experimenting with new and Competition from local/regional innovative products and/or concepts supply Favorable image of American products Tariffs and Non-Tariff trade barriers Highly consolidated retail industry Source: FAS/The Hague Figure 9: Consumer Trends Consumers? needs and preferences: Health: natural ingredients, lower calories, low or no sugar, healthy meals Convenience: fresh pre-packed food components, take-away, fresh ready-to-eat meals Price: discount, special offers, will only accept higher prices when can be justified Food Safety: more information, more guarantees Stores: There is a need for the more traditional store that offers a wide assortment of products, fresh, specialty and luxury products, personalized service, etc. while on the other hand there is a need for discounters, stores that focus on price. Source: FAS/The Hague Changing Tastes The non-Dutch population in the Netherlands (20%) annually grows by 2 percent whereas ethnic Dutch population growth is stagnate. As a result, there has been strong growth in the number of stores serving ethnic niche markets and in demand for non-traditional Dutch food. The non-Belgian population in Belgium is much smaller and accounts for only 7%. More information on this subject can be found in GAIN NL7021 at http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp. Organic Food Recent figures show that consumers are increasingly buying organic products (mainly bread and dairy products), the organic industry however is still a rather small industry with a market share in the Benelux of roughly 3 percent. More information on the Benelux market for organic products can be found in GAIN NL6024http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp. Information on the EU market can be found in GAIN NL0022 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/EU- 27%20Organic%20Products%20Market%20Report_The%20Hague_EU-27_8-17-2010.pdf. Awareness of Health and Well-Being Consumers are becoming more aware of and concerned about the effect food types have on their health and well-being. There is a clear trend to more healthful lifestyle in Western European countries. The following US industries have all benefitted from this trend: nuts (pistachios, almonds, walnuts, etc.), fruits (cranberries, pomegranates, berries, etc.), seafood (salmon, halibut, etc.) and to some extent pulses. Another driver is that consumers are more cautious about food borne illnesses. Consumers are looking for and finding more information on this topic. The media, including the Internet, TV and magazines, respond to this desire and feed into it. Section 2. Exporter Business Tips Local Business Customs Following are some characteristics of doing business in the Netherlands, Belgium or Luxembourg: Most business people speak English and have a high level of education (Masters or Bachelors degree). Generally speaking, they are straightforward and business-minded. They want to be well informed about the product/service and their business partner before doing business. At the same time, they do not want to waste anybody?s time and can be quick decision makers. Due to the increasing power of retailers and to changing consumers? demands, food processors are increasingly looking for long-term partnerships rather than a one-off business transaction. In times of a weaker dollar, importers are especially looking for added value from the US. They are looking for healthy or unique products for their retail/foodservice customers. Food Standards & Regulations and General Import & Inspection Procedures A detailed report on import regulation standards and also on general import and inspection procedures can be found in GAIN Reports NL1001 and BE1001. Manufacturers (that are not eligible to export to the European Union) that want to send their products to the EU for e.g. exhibiting at a trade show or for research purposes can request an import waiver. Contact the VWA for obtaining the right documents and specific requirements: Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (nVWA) Division PRIMEX Tel. +31 78 6112100 Department TVE Import Fax +31 78 6112141 Postbus 3000 E-mail: import@vwa.nl 3330 DC Zwijndrecht Section 3. Market Sector Structure And Trends The Food Retail Market The latest information available on the food retail market can be found in GAIN Report NL0002 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Retail%20Foods_The%20Hague_Netherlands_1- 26-2010.pdf The Foodservice Market The latest information available on the foodservice market can be found in GAIN Report NL9002 or http://www.fas.usda.gov/gainfiles/200901/146327090.pdf. The Food Processing Market The latest information available on the food processing market can be found in GAIN Report NL8012 or http://www.fas.usda.gov/gainfiles/200806/146294840.pdf. Private Label Products Albeit slowly, the market for private label products continues to grow in Europe, the current market share is around 30-35%. Retailers are investing a lot in their own Retail Brands by focusing on adding value rather than competing on price. These Retail Brands are increasingly competing with the international A- brands. The big difference between an A-brand and a retail brand is that the latter is limited to this specific retailer. Other private label brands that focus on price are found in the lower end of the market. Research has shown that the buyers of private label products are indeed the larger households (4 or more persons). Frequent buyers are also the high educated and more affluent buyers. The Private Label Show that annually takes place in Amsterdam can offer good opportunities for U.S. companies that want to expand business overseas. There are great possibilities for U.S. suppliers of tree nuts, peanuts, pulses, rice, fruit (juices), seafood, and other food ingredients. Section 4. Best High-value Products Prospects Figure 10: Netherlands, The Best High-Value Products Prospects, USD 1,000 Commod mports ity / Impor Its, onstraints Over Market Attractiveness for from US Key C, code 2010 2010 Market Development USA Bovine Cuts Boneless 559,072 56,880 Competition from Argentina, Demand for good quality beef and / 020130 (10%) Ireland and Brazil willingness to pay a premium price Vegetable seeds / 300,545 46,088 Competition from France, China Highly sophisticated, specialized 120991 and Chile and internationally operating horticultural industry Grapefruit / 080540 187,081 34,178 Competition from China, South Demand for healthy products and Africa and Spain good fresh produce Non alcoholic 317,582 30,864 Competition from Germany, Demand for different and value beverages / 220290 Austria, the UK and Belgium added drinks Walnuts / 080232 26,657 11,920 Competition from Chile and India Demand for healthy products, US continues to be a steady and large supplier of walnuts Berries / 081020 34,045 1,040 Competition from Mexico, Poland, Demand for healthy products and Spain and Belgium good fresh produce Cane molasses / 42,711 10,964 Competition from Pakistan and Sophisticated food processing 170310 (26%) Mauritius industry Sweet potatoes / 18,545 7,486 Competition from China, Egypt and Demand for healthy products and 071420 (40%) South Africa good fresh produce Sockeye Salmon / 7,985 6,584 There is no real competition Demand for healthy products, 030311 (82%) Demand for seafood is up, Alaska seafood has great image Frozen Orange juice 5,329 125 (2%) Competition from most of Latin Demand for healthy products, / 200911 American countries demand for fruit (products) is good, US is a good supplier of citrus products Sawdust and wood 186,295 51,006 Competition from Canada and Demand for bio-fuels waste / 440130 (27%) Germany Scallops / 030721 3,111 1,649 price - lack of knowledge by growing awareness and demand in (53%) customer the high-end HRI industry Food preparations / 638,034 112,277 competition from Germany, the Benelux has a big export- 210690 (18%) Belgium and Switzerland focused food processing industry Almonds / 080212 91,300 66,382 US represents 73% of total Strong demand from food (73%) imports, some competition comes manufacturers, confectionary and from Spain snack industry Pistachios / 080250 104,171 71,323 competition from Iran Strong demand from food (68%) manufacturers, confectionary and snack industry Fruit and other 210,469 33,725 competition from India, Costa Rica Demand for healthy products and edible parts of plants (16%) and Ecuador good fresh produce / 200899 Foliage / 060491 222,466 43,618 depending on the developments in Benelux dominates global trade in (20%) the cut flower industry, cut flowers and therefore the trade competition from Costa Rica, Israel in foliage within the EU and Guatemala Wine / 2204 1,019,401 8,999 (1%) competition from France, Germany per capita consumption of wine and New World Wine countries continues to grow in the Benelux, demand for new world wines grows Source: World Trade Atlas Figure 11: Belgium, The Best High-Value Products Prospects, USD 1,000 Commodity / Imports Imports Key Constraints Over from US code 2010 2010 Ma Market Attractiveness for USA rket Development Walnuts / 080232 14,000 6,795 (51%) Competition from France, Demand for healthy products, US continues Italy and Moldova to be a steady and large supplier of walnuts Orange juice / 222,724 22,864 Competition from most of Demand for healthy products, demand for 200912 (10%) Latin American countries fruit (products) is good, US is a good supplier of citrus products Scallops / 030729 49,274 22,325 price - lack of knowledge by growing awareness and demand in the (45%) customer high-end HRI industry Nuts & Seeds / 81,077 8,596 (11%) Competition from Turkey, Strong demand from food manufacturers, 200819 Italy and Spain confectionary and snack industry Butter / 040510 382,301 5,683 (1%) Competition from Sophisticated food processing industry Netherlands, Ireland, France and Germany Mixes & Doughs / 95,395 4,064 (4%) Competition from France, Demand for specialty and value added 190120 Netherlands and Germany processed food products Source: World Trade Atlas Section 5. Key Contacts and Further Information U.S. Embassy FAS/The Hague Marcel Pinckaers Lange Voorhout 102, 2514 EJ The Hague, The Netherlands Phone: +31-70-310-2305 Fax: +31-70-365-7681 E-mail: marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov Website: www.usembassy.nl/fas.html or www.fas.usda.gov To obtain the appropriate commodity code for your product, you can contact the Dutch customs at +31 45 574 3031 or visit the following website http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/dds/en/tarhome.htm. This website also provides tariff classification and rates. It is also possible to obtain a written binding ruling called a Binding Tariff Information (BTI). This will provide assurances that you have the correct tariff classification for your product. More information on how to apply for BTI is available online at: http://www.douane.nl/zakelijk/invoer/en/invoer-05.html More information on EU import duties can be found on http://useu.usmission.gov/agri/import.html. Marketing An overview of leading trade shows can be found in Appendix 2. US Cooperators An overview of US cooperators can be found at http://www.usaedc.org/about.cfm#members (click on ?Click Here for a list of USAEDC Members?). Be aware that not all US cooperators have programs for the European market. Reports Related Reports from FAS/The Hague and other European offices can be found on http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp. Below you will find a selection of the reports from FAS/The Hague. Figure 12: FAS/The Hague reports Report Number Report Title Date Released NL5002/BE5001 Benelux Horticulture Report 01/2005 NL6009 Dutch Snack and Confectionary Market 03/2006 NL6024 Benelux Organic Market 07/2006 NL7002/BE7001 Benelux Tree Nuts Market 01/2007 NL7008 Benelux Beef Market 04/2007 NL7021 Dutch Specialty Foods 09/2007 NL8009 EU-27 Seafood Marketing Report 04/2008 NL8012 Food Processing Industry 06/2008 NL1001/BE1001 FAIRS Report 01/2011 NL0029/BE0003 Export Certification Guide 12/2010 NL0025 EU-27 Frozen Potato Report 10/2010 NL9002 HRI Foodservice Industry 01/2009 NL9009 Fishery Report 04/2009 NL0002 Food Retail Report 01/2010 NL0022 EU-27 Organic Market Report 09/2010 For more information on exporting to the Benelux market and Market Development related questions, please contact Marcel Pinckaers at marcel.pinckaers@usda.gov or +31 (0)70-3102.305 Appendix 1. Leading Wholesalers/Distributors in the Benelux (in alphabetic order) Deli XL Hanos / ISPC Mr. D. Slootweg Mr. H. van Looijengoed P.O. Box 440 P.O. Box 10378 Frankeneng 18 Stadhoudersmolenweg 37 6710 BK, Ede, the Netherlands 7301 GJ, Apeldoorn, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)318-678911 P: +31-(0)55-5294444 F: +31-(0)318-622347 F: +31-(0)55-5224621 E: dick.slootweg@ahold.nl E: hvanlooijengoed@hanos.nl W: www.delixl.nl W: www.hanos.nl JAVA De Kruidenier Foodservices Nederland Wingepark 10 Sluisjesdijk 111 B-3110 Rotselaar, Belgium 3087 AE Rotterdam, the Netherlands P: +32-(0)16 589 620 P: +31-(0)10-4950790 F: +32-(0)16 589 611 F: +31-(0)10-4956696 W: www.jave-coffee.be E: info@kruidenier.nl W: www.kruidenier.nl De Kweker Makro (Metro Cash & Carry) Mr. Jan Boer Mr. M. (Maarten) Van Hamburg P.O. Box 59345 Mr. B. Eijssink Jan van Gaalenstraat 4 Diermervijver, Gebouw Vijverpoort, Dalsteindreef 101-139 1040 KH, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 1112 XC Diemen, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)20-6063606 P: +31-(0)20-3980200 F: +31-(0)20-6063600 F: +31-(0)20-3980201 E: info@kweker.nl I: bas.eijssink@metro-mcc.nl W: www.kweker.nl W: www.makro.nl Sligro - VEN VHC ? MAXXAM Mr. R. van Herpen P.O. Box 90 Mr. J. te Voert 3340 AB Hedrik-Ido-Ambacht, the Netherlands P.O. Box 47 P: +31-(0)78-6833400 Corridor 11 F: +31-(0)78-6833830 5460 AA, Veghel, the Netherlands I: info@vhc.nl P: +31-(0)413-343500 W: www.vhc.nl F: +31-(0)413-341520 W: www.maxxam.nl E: info@sligro.nl E: jtevoert@sligro.nl W: www.sligro.nl Source: FAS/The Hague Appendix 2. Trade Shows Trade Shows Frequently Visited by Benelux Food Buyers Show When Show Details & Organizers Interzum, Cologne, Germany May 25 ? 28, 2011 Tel: +31-(0)10-2064850 Regional tradeshow for wood products (furniture and www.koelnmesse.nl interior) www.interzum.de Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov Food Week, Utrecht, The Netherlands September 2011 tel: +31-(0)30-2952799 National food and beverage show Bi-Annual fax: +31-(0)30-2952814 Contact: Marcel Pinckaers www.foodweek.nl marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 ANUGA, Cologne, Germany. October 8 ? 12, 2011 tel: +49-180-5204220 Europe?s largest food & beverages show in 2011 Bi-Annual fax: +49-221-821991010 *USDA Endorsed Show* www.anuga.com Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov Hortifair, Amsterdam, The Netherlands November 01 - 04, 2011 tel: +31 (0)297-344033 Horticultural show fax: +31 (0)297-326850 Contact: Marcel Pinckaers www.hortifair.nl marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov info@hortifair.nl +31 70 3102 305 Food Ingredients, Paris, France November 29 ? December 01, *USDA Endorsed Show* 2011 Contact: Laurent Journot Laurent.journot@fas.usda.gov Horeca Expo, Gent, Belgium November 20 - 24, 2011 tel: +32-(0)9-2419211 Regional hotel, restaurant and catering show fax: +32-(0)9-2419475 Contact: Marcel Pinckaers email: marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov horeca@flandersexpo.be +31 70 3102 305 www.horecaexpo.be HORECAVA, Amsterdam, January 10 ? 13, 2012 tel: + 31-(0)20-5753032 The Netherlands fax: + 31-(0)20-5753093 National hotel and restaurant show www.horecava.nl Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 Sirha, Lyon, France January 26 ? 30, 2012 *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Laurent Journot Laurent.journot@fas.usda.gov ISM, Cologne, Germany January 29 ? February 1, 2012 www.ism-cologne.com International sweets show *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov European Fine Food Fair, Maastricht, The Netherlands January 30 ? February 01, 2012 tel: +31-(0)43-3838383 Regional high-end Hotel and restaurant show fax: +31-(0)43-383830 Contact: Marcel Pinckaers www.efff.nl marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 Fruit logistica, Berlin, Germany February 8 ? 10, 2012 www.fruitlogistica.com European fresh fruit and vegetable show *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov BioFach, Nuremberg, Germany February 15 - 18, 2012 www.biofach.de European organic show *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov Tavola, Kortrijk, Belgium March 11 ? 13, 2012 www.tavola-xpo.be Regional food retail show Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 European Seafood Exhibition, Brussels, Belgium April 24 ? 26, 2012 tel: +1-207-8425504 World?s largest seafood show fax: +1-207-8425505 *USDA Endorsed Show* www.euroseafood.com Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 Interzoo, Nuremberg, Germany May 17 - 20, 2012 www.interzoo.com Petfood show *USDA Endorsed Show* Trade Show Office Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov World of Private Label (PLMA) Amsterdam, The May 24 ? 25, 2012 tel: +31-(0)20-5753032 Netherlands fax: +31-(0)20-5753093 Europe?s largest private label show www.plmainternational.com Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 SIAL, Paris, France October 21 -25, 2012 tel: +33-(0)1-49685498 Europe?s largest food & beverages show in 2010 Bi-Annual fax: +33-(0)1-49685632 *USDA Endorsed Show* www.sial.fr Contact: Laurent Journot Laurent.journot@fas.usda.gov Internationale BouwBeurs, Utrecht, The Netherlands February 4 ? 9, 2013 Tel: +31-(0)30-295 2731 National show for wood products (construction) www.bouwbeurs.nl Contact: Marcel Pinckaers ma rcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 IFE London, the U.K. March 17 ? 20, 2013 Contact: Julie Nichols julie.nicholson@fas.usda.gov Source: FAS/The Hague Appendix 3. An Overview Of The Leading Benelux Importers Of Specialty Foods Supplying Both Foodservice And Food Retail (in alphabetic order) American Food Service Bickery Food Group Mr. G. Chin-A-Kwie Mr. J. Manassen Gageldijk 1 P.O. Box 433 3602 AG Maarssen, the Netherlands 1200 AK, Hilversum, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)30-2613604 P: +31-(0)35-6560244 F: +31-(0)30-2613624 F: +31-(0)35-6563824 E: g.chin@americanfood.nl E: joost.manassen@bickery.nl W: www.americanfood.nl W: www.bickery.nl Engel Foreign Food GranFood Mr. W. Westerveld Mr. O. Brokke Ondernemingsweg 264 P.O. Box 19045 1422 DZ, Uithoorn, the Netherlands Saturnusstraat 43 P: +31-(0)297-533833 2500 CA, The Hague, the Netherlands F: +31-(0)297-531665 P: +31-(0)70-3815007 E: w.westerveld@effbv.nl F: +31-(0)70-3850259 W: www.engelforeignfood.com E: obrokke@granfood.nl W: www.grandfood.nl Maer Foods Pietercil Barends Mr. H. Rijpma Mr. D. van Bueren P.O. Box 79 Bleiswijkseweg 51 7590 AB, Denekamp, the Netherlands 2280 AB, Zoetemeer, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)541-358010 P: +31-(0)79-3441148 F: +31-(0)541-358011 F: +31-(0)79-3424549 E: hillebrand.rijpma@maerfoods.eu E: danny.van.Bueren@pietercil.com W: www.maerfoods.eu W: www.pietercil.com Pietercil Delby?s Two Food Mr. P. Deschaepmeester Mrs. L. van Eijden-Vellekoop Vitseroelstraat 74 Steenhoffstraat 5 B-1740 Ternat, Belgium 3764 BH Soest, the Netherlands tel.: +32 2583 81 00 P: +31-(0)35-6090990 fax: +32 2582 29 63 F: +31-(0)35-6090988 E:philippe.de.schaepmeester@pietercil.com E: info@2food.nl W: www.pietercil.com W: www.2food.nl Wessanen Wonderfood Mr. R. Miedema Mr. M. Lazraq Mr. A. van Daalen Avenue de L?Artisanat, 6 P.O. Box 2554 4420 Braine-l?Alleud, Belgium Beneluxlaan 9 P: +32-(0)2-332-1320 3500 GN, Utrecht, the Netherlands F: +32-(0)2-403-0740 P: +31-(0)30-2988738 E: majid@wonderfood.eu F: +31-(0)30-2988703 W: www.wonderfood.eu E: arnoud.van.daalen@wessanen.com E: Richard.Miedema@wessanen.com W: www.boas.nl Zenobia Mr. P. Cosse Rue du Grand Cortil 17 B-1300 Wavre, Belgium P: +32-(0)10-222394 F: +32-(0)10-222394 E: info@zenobia.be W: www.zenobia.be Source: FAS/The Hague Table A. Key Trade & Demographic Information For The Netherlands & Belgium 2010 Figures The Netherlands: Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Imports From All Countries (USD 51,682 / 4 Million) / U.S. Market Share (%) Consumer Oriented Food Imports From All Countries (USD Million) 25,364 / 3 / U.S. Market Share (%) Fish and Seafood Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. 2,617 / 3 Market Share (%) Population (Million) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 16.7 / almost 1 Number of Major Metropolitan Areas Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (USD) 46,627 Unemployment Rate (%) 4.5 Source: World Trade Atlas Belgium: Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. 36,854 / 2 Market Share (%) Consumer Oriented Food Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. Market 19,611 / 0 Share (%) Fish and Seafood Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. Market Share 1,931 / 2 (%) Total Population (Millions) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 10.7 / 0.5 Number of Major Metropolitan Areas Brussels and Antwerp Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (USD) 40,748 Unemployment Rate (%) 8.4 Source: World Trade Atlas Exchange Rate Year USD EURO 2001 1 1.12 2002 1 1.06 2003 1 0.88 2004 1 0.81 2005 1 0.80 2006 1 0.80 2007 1 0.73 2008 1 0.68 2009 1 0.72 2010 1 0.75 Table B. Consumer-Oriented & Fish Products Imports Imports from the Imports from the Ne World US. US Market Share therlands Imports 2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010 USD Million USD Million % CONSUMER-ORIENTED 28,800 25,690 25,364 732 704 729 3 3 3 AGRICULTURAL TOTAL Snack Foods (Excl. Nuts) 1,600 1,412 1,267 9 10 8 1 1 1 Breakfast Cereals & Pancake Mix 133 133 108 0 0 0 0 0 0 Red Meats, Fresh/Chilled/Frozen 2,961 2,726 2,724 44 54 69 1 2 3 Red Meats, Prepared/Preserved 1,280 1,155 1,117 0 0 0 0 0 0 Poultry Meat 855 708 674 0 0 0 0 0 0 Dairy Products (Excl. Cheese) 2,634 2,058 2,189 27 7 11 1 0 1 Cheese 910 775 803 14 0 1 2 0 0 Eggs & Products 233 243 262 7 5 6 3 2 2 Fresh Fruit 4,379 3,807 4,014 46 41 49 1 1 1 Fresh Vegetables 1,711 1,525 1,686 6 4 4 0 0 0 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 2,154 1,984 1,893 69 73 79 3 4 4 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 1,630 1,346 1,402 64 65 61 4 5 4 Tree Nuts 620 634 653 145 173 182 23 27 28 Wine & Beer 1,525 1,404 1,228 35 22 10 2 2 1 Nursery Products & Cut Flowers 1,913 1,649 1,547 64 49 50 3 3 3 Pet Foods (Dog & Cat Food) 278 266 199 6 2 1 2 1 1 Other Consumer-Oriented Products 3,986 3,865 3,599 196 197 198 5 5 6 FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS 2,843 2,646 2,617 98 92 88 3 3 3 Salmon 100 105 106 16 18 15 16 17 14 Surimi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Crustaceans 622 658 661 2 2 1 0 0 0 Groundfish & Flatfish 424 376 369 1 1 0 0 0 0 Molluscs 114 97 95 19 17 10 17 18 11 Other Fishery Products 1,582 1,410 1,386 60 54 61 4 4 4 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 52,620 44,991 46,159 1,967 1,423 1,805 4 3 4 TOTAL AGRICULTURAL, FISH & 59,511 50,510 51,682 2,119 1,592 1,979 4 3 4 FORESTRY TOTAL Source: World Trade Atlas Imports from the Imports from the World US. US Market Share Belgium Imports 2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010 USD Million USD Million % CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGR 783 19,611 319 275 288 1 1 1 ICULTURAL TO ,043 19,TA 22L Snack Foods (Excl. Nuts) 1,234 1,176 1,145 3 4 4 0 0 0 Breakfast Cereals & Pancake Mix 167 171 143 1 2 1 1 1 1 Red Meats, Fresh/Chilled/Frozen 1,170 1,051 993 12 12 7 1 1 1 Red Meats, Prepared/Preserved 798 757 742 0 0 0 0 0 0 Poultry Meat 413 415 443 0 0 0 0 0 0 Dairy Products (Excl. Cheese) 2,193 1,741 2,094 12 6 11 1 0 1 Cheese 1,455 1,299 1,325 0 0 0 0 0 0 Eggs & Products 156 153 153 0 0 0 0 0 0 Fresh Fruit 3,754 3,134 2,926 35 18 10 1 1 0 Fresh Vegetables 1,154 1,071 1,134 0 0 0 0 0 0 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 1,787 1,615 1,627 25 24 31 1 2 2 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 1,023 986 822 13 23 39 1 2 5 Tree Nuts 372 323 297 118 99 82 32 31 28 Wine & Beer 1,832 1,459 1,375 7 4 6 0 0 0 Nursery Products & Cut Flowers 613 649 670 35 27 29 6 4 4 Pet Foods (Dog & Cat Food) 543 534 464 16 20 18 3 4 4 Other Consumer-Oriented Products 3,379 3,248 3,256 42 36 49 1 1 1 FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS 2,197 1,875 1,931 27 32 38 1 2 2 Salmon 128 138 152 5 4 6 4 3 4 Surimi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Crustaceans 858 668 709 4 2 1 0 0 0 Groundfish & Flatfish 97 80 78 1 1 1 1 1 1 Molluscs 229 205 199 13 19 26 6 10 13 Other Fishery Products 885 783 794 5 5 5 1 1 1 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 36,515 32,018 32,046 635 513 540 2 2 2 TOTAL AGRICULTURAL, FISH & 2 2 FORESTR 2,148 36,649 36,854 707 604 624 2Y TOTA 4L Source: World Trade Atlas Table C. Top 15 Suppliers Of Consumer Foods And Edible Fishery Products CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGRICULTURAL TOTAL FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS Report: Netherlands Imports - Top 15 Ranking Report: Netherlands Imports - Top 15 Ranking USD 1,000 2008 2009 2010 USD 1,000 2008 2009 2010 Germany 5,836,113 5,103,300 4,662,961 Iceland 407,083 372,106 351,232 Belgium 3,973,107 3,796,620 3,675,686 Germany 320,858 326,098 304,393 Brazil 2,122,390 1,796,040 1,799,803 Belgium 185,691 209,080 160,553 France 2,078,491 1,726,205 1,609,183 China 176,866 171,684 156,489 Spain 1,460,366 1,355,936 1,419,179 Morocco 129,336 139,528 151,408 South Africa 975,677 830,156 1,018,441 Norway 138,087 137,286 143,234 United Kingdom 962,928 860,181 836,341 Vietnam 145,179 119,362 129,231 Italy 797,279 752,963 822,092 United Kingdom 120,299 105,097 117,355 United States 731,647 703,633 729,457 Denmark 164,248 106,235 103,337 Poland 751,817 699,466 674,933 United States 97,951 91,759 87,622 Other 9,110,628 8,065,186 8,115,499 Russia 60,311 71,306 72,416 World 28,800,443 25,689,686 25,363,575 Other 896,821 796,547 839,492 World 2,842,730 2,646,088 2,616,762 Source: World Trade Atlas CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGRICULTURAL TOTAL FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS Report: Belgium Imports - Top 15 Ranking Report: Belgium Imports - Top 15 Ranking USD 1,000 2008 2009 2010 USD 1,000 2008 2009 2010 Netherlands 4,954,673 4,561,024 4,669,994 Netherlands 530,930 493,683 476,618 France 5,358,745 4,695,903 4,619,560 France 211,091 203,433 194,607 Germany 2746,463 2,415,739 2,365,400 Germany 131,805 114,988 115,570 Spain 939,228 906,764 946,507 Bangladesh 134,973 82,877 103,113 Italy 866,648 815,603 816,668 Denmark 99,785 85,101 90,244 Colombia 708,945 636,906 643,330 Vietnam 97,070 92,874 86,197 Brazil 697,381 689,101 544,254 Iceland 74,168 83,105 79,143 United Kingdom 527,766 473,027 511,769 United Kingdom 82,104 66,998 75,271 Costa Rica 658,714 494,169 430,000 China 107,689 67,215 73,366 New Zealand 534,137 394,435 353,633 India 98,690 64,782 67,054 Ecuador 379,747 345,401 348,336 Sweden 41,559 40,186 56,818 United States 319,262 274,757 288,122 United States 27,367 31,523 37,948 Other 3,351,687 3,079,898 3,073,352 Other 560,175 448,185 475,349 World 22,043,396 19,782,727 19,610,925 World 2,197,406 1,874,950 1,931,298 Source: World Trade Atlas
Posted: 11 July 2011, last updated 11 July 2011

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