Dairy and Products Annual

An Expert's View about Food , Beverages and Tobacco in Brazil

Posted on: 27 Nov 2011

Post has revised production and export estimates for dairy products for 2011 to reflect new estimates made by trade sources. These estimates call for more profitable domestic milk prices, appreciation of the Brazilian currency and low competitiveness which makes Brazilian dairy products less competitive in the world market.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 10/28/2011 GAIN Report Number: BR 0718 Brazil Dairy and Products Annual Annual Dairy Report Approved By: Robert Hoff, Agricultural Counselor Prepared By: Priscila Ming, Agricultural Assistant Report Highlights: Post forecasts fluid milk production to increase by 2 percent in 2012, supported by a relatively strong Brazilian economy which will support higher domestic demand. Post has revised production and export estimates for dairy products for 2011 to reflect new estimates made by trade sources. These estimates call for more profitable domestic milk prices, appreciation of the Brazilian currency and low competitiveness which makes Brazilian dairy products less competitive in the world market. Commodities: Dairy, Milk, Fluid Production: Post forecasts fluid milk production in 2012 to increase to 31.3 billion liters, up 2 percent from the current year, this increase will be supported by firm domestic demand as Brazilians are able to increase their purchasing power. However, uncertainty remains regarding Brazilian dairy exports since the appreciation of the Brazilian currency and low competitiveness make Brazilian dairy products less competitive in the world market. The increase in domestic consumption in 2011 helped the sector avoid a decrease in production, since the internal market offered more profitable milk prices than the global market. The Brazilian government (GOB) does not maintain milk stocks, so the strong demand for milk products coupled with a late start in the producing season led to high milk prices in the local market and fewer products available for export. The Southwest and South are the top milk producing regions in Brazil. In August 2011, there was an increase of 6.3 percent in milk production in the southern of Brazil ( from the three producing states of Rio Grande do Sul, Parana and Santa Catarina) compared to August 2010. Rio Grande do Sul decreased milk production in the first quarter as a result of unfavorable weather conditions, but it recovered in the second half of 2011. Consumption: Brazil dairy consumption is estimated at 150 liters per capita per year. Consumption of fluid milk is forecast to increase around 3 percent in 2012. The increase is derived mostly from an estimated increase in industrial use, supported by higher disposable consumer income. Milk products in Brazil are not only expanding in volume but also gaining in sophistication and health orientation. Innovation is focusing on functionality as manufacturers seek to meet the health requirements of an increasingly health-oriented middle-class. Cooperativa Central dos Produtores Rurais de Minas Gerais Ltda (Itambé), for instance, recently released a version of long-life/UHT milk enriched with calcium, iron and vitamins, while Cooperativa Central Agropecuária Sudoeste launched similar products under its Frimesa brand. Demographic growth, along with economic recovery, is underpinning demand for drinking milk products in emerging economies, and Brazil is no exception. According to Euromonitor International's Countries and Consumers database, Brazilian GDP grew by 8 percent in real terms in 2010, reversing the 0.2 percent decline registered the previous year. Furthermore, the urban population, accounting for most of the consumption of processed drinking milk in the country, is projected to grow by 11 million people over the 2010-2015 period. Good economic prospects and an expanding population in urban areas will drive future growth. By the end of 2015, per capita expenditure on drink milk products will reach US$ 67 in Brazil, exceeding the level projected for developed markets such as France (US$ 52) and Germany (US$ 45). By then, Brazil will no longer be known as an 'emerging economy' in milk product terms. Prices The average fluid milk prices increased 16 percent compared to the same period in the previous year. From January to September 2011, the milk price paid was almost 9 percent above the average prices in 2010. Lack of stocks and higher domestic demand kept strong prices in 2011. Despite higher receipts, production costs have also increased, limiting the financial recovery of the milk producers. Table 1 - São Paulo: Monthly Average Price Received by Producers for Fluid Milk, Type C, per Liter, Jan-Sep 2008-11: Month 2008 2009 2010 2011 Jan 0.6513 0.6331 0.7125 0.7676 Feb 0.6837 0.6358 0.7393 0.4461 Mar 0.7110 0.6385 0.7415 0.7963 Apr 0.7554 0.6536 0.7492 0.8253 May 0.7776 0.6871 0.7400 0.8680 Jun 0.8050 0.7378 0.7456 0.8996 Jul 0.7925 0.8189 0.7560 0.9247 Aug 0.7637 0.8171 0.7485 0.9244 Sep 0.7173 0.7862 0.7425 0.9395 Year Average 0.7397 0.7120 0.7417 0.8579 (in U.S.$) 0.44 0.42 0.44 0.54 Source: Cepea Average Exchange rate for Sep 2011: US$ 1.00 = R$ 1.60 Milk drink products experienced a 10 percent current value growth rate in 2010. This was due to the strong performance of long-life/UHT milk, which accounts for the bulk of total sales, and the recovery of the unit price of raw milk which had previously suffered a steep decline as a result of the economic slowdown. Sales of long-life/UHT milk increased by 3 percent in volume terms in 2010 compared to a review period average of 1 percent. Fluid Milk Acquisition from Dairy Producers ? 2011 Source: Valor Economico, Leite Brasil, CAN/DECON and Embrapa Gado de Leite The Brazilian dairy sector continued to experience further consolidation in 2010. Over the last few years there have been several important acquisitions in the sector. Last year, Laticínios Bom Gosto Ltda and Leitbom merged to become Lácteos Brasil. In early 2010, Monticiano Participações established a consortium together with Gloria Alimentos and Ibituruna, in which Laep Investments (the owner of Parmalat) will lease the assets of both companies to Monticiano and will also license the Parmalat brand until 2017. Brasil Foods is the other brand from the result of the merge from of Batavo and Elege. The potential merger between Cooperativa Central dos Produtores Rurais de Minas Gerais Ltda (Itambé) with other cooperatives in the state of Minas Gerais, such as Centroleite, Confepar, Cemil and Minas Leite will lead to the establishment of one of the largest operators within the milk drink sector, with revenues estimated at over US$ 2 billion per year. Distribution will become an important issue for these companies in terms of increasing or even maintaining their volume shares. Value-for-money products such as fortified UHT milk will continue to remain a niche, and are not expected to have any impact on the rankings of these companies in the short term. Trade: Brazil imports insignificant volumes of fluid milk and packaged UHT milk imports are sold by companies from Argentina and Uruguay with commercial interests in Brazil. Another effect of the strong Brazilian currency is that imports of dairy products (cheese, milk powder) also increased, since the imported products are more competitive than domestic produced products. Table 2 - Tariff Rate Table Tariff Product Description Rate er Info Number (%) Oth (HTS) (1) 0401.10 Milk and cream not concentrated nor containing added sugar or other sweetening matter: of a fat content, by weight, not exceeding 1 percent 0401.10.10 UHT 14 Mercosul: Zero 0401.10.90 Others 12 Mercosul: Zero 0402.20 Milk and cream not concentrated nor containing added sugar Mercosul: or other sweetening matter: of a fat content, by weight, Zero exceeding 1 percent but not exceeding 6 percent 0401.20.10 UHT 14 Mercosul: Zero 0401.20.90 Others 12 Mercosul: Zero Note: (1) MERCOSUL?s Common External Tariff (CXT). The CXT is applied to all imports other than from MERCOSUL. These tariffs are assessed on the CIF value of the product. Stocks: Current milk and dairy product stocks held by major dairy companies are considered operating stocks to meet short term demand for their products. There are no government held stocks of milk or milk products in Brazil. Policy: On June 17, 2011, GOB released the ?Crop and Livestock Plan for the 2011-12? marketing year. The ?Plano de Safra?, as called in Portuguese, is announced each year before the planting season of the Summer Crop in September-November. The plan is the best way to understand the array of Brazil?s government programs to support production and investment for the agricultural sector at subsidized interest rates. The 2011/12 plan calls for a total of R$ 107.2 billion in credit lines allocated for commercial and export-oriented agriculture, equivalent to US$ 67 billion at the current exchange rate of US$1.00=R$1.60, an increase of 7.2 percent from last year. The total amount of credit announced is split into three major categories: a. credit for production and marketing: US$ 50.1 billion, up 6.2 percent from the previous year; b. credit for investment: US$ 12.81 billion, up 13.9 percent from last year; c. special lines of credit: US$ 4.06 billion, up 1.5 percent from last year. Brazilian farmers will use most of the credit lines (US$ 40.06 billion) above at the subsidized interest rate of 6.75 percent annually. There are exceptions for some agricultural programs where the interest rate varies from 5.5% per year for the Low Carbon Agriculture Program (ABC) to 9.5 percent per year for the Modernization of Agricultural Machinery Program (Moderfrota). Notes:(1) The interest rate of 6.75 is nearly a negative rate if discounted by the annual inflation rate for the past 12 months of 6.5 percent; (2) The current average free market rate for farmers in Brazil runs between 18 and 22 percent per year, depending on the individual bank-farmer negotiation; (3) The average market interest rate is 30 percent per year for business in general, and 49 per percent per year for consumers. During the announcement of the 2011/2012 Plan, Brazilian President, Dilma Rousseff, is quoted as saying that ?loans at nearly negative rates are compatible with the international market and will allow Brazilian farmers to compete under equal conditions with other countries?. The following are the main aspects of the 2011/12 Crop and Livestock Plan: 1. Interest Rates. The Government decided to maintain last year?s level of subsidized interested rates at 6.75 percent, and reduced the interest rate to 5.5 percent per year for low carbon agriculture programs (ABC); 2. Production and Marketing Credit. The amount allocated to finance production and marketing costs is US$ 50.1 billion, a 6 percent increase over last year?s plan, of which US$ 40.06 billion is offered at a fixed interest rate of 6.75 percent with the remaining US$ 10.06 billion offered at market-influenced interest rates, historically around 15 percent. 3. The Minimum Support Price Program. This program was allocated R$5.2 billion (US$3.3billion), the same as of last year; 4. Investment Credit. Total funds available for financing investment in farm and livestock programs is R$ 20.5 billion (US$12.8 billion), up 13.9 percent from the previous year, and at the subsidized interest rates ranging from 5.5 to 9.5 percent per year, according to the programs listed in the plan, such as the ABC program (5.5%), the MODERINFRA program (6.75%), the MODERAGRO program (6.75%); the PRODECOOP (6.75%), the PROCAP-AGRO (6.75), the MODERFROTA (9.5%) and the MODERFROTA-PRONAMP (7.5%); Milk producers are also entitled to state dairy development programs designed to increase productivity through pasture improvement and animal genetics. State government programs are also developed to assist and improve social and economic conditions of small milk producers. However, the most important state subsidy program to milk producers is the exemption of the state value-added tax (ICMS) on the sale of milk by producers and cooperatives. This benefit, however, is only available to a few states in Brazil, mostly in the Center-West and South regions. In addition to these federal and state programs, milk producers also benefit from financing programs from large dairies, such as Nestle, which are specifically designed to increase milk productivity and quality. These programs are only available for those integrated milk producers with these respective dairies. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: PSD: Dairy, Milk, and Fluid (HTS: 0401.10; 0401.20) 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Dairy, Milk, Fluid 2010 2011 2012 Brazil U S D A O f f icial USDA Official USDA D New ata P D New ata ost P Official Jan ost Data Data Data Data Cows In Milk 17,600 17,600 18,200 18,200 18,600 (1000 HEAD) Cows Milk 29,948 29,948 30,846 30,610 31,300 (1000 MT) Production Other Milk 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Production Total Production 29,948 29,948 30,846 30,610 31,300 (1000 MT) Other Imports 1 5 2 6 5 (1000 MT) Total Imports 1 5 2 6 5 (1000 MT) Total Supply 29,949 29,953 30,848 30,616 31,305 (1000 MT) Other Exports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Exports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Fluid Use Dom. 11,274 11,278 11,548 11,316 11,600 (1000 MT) Consum. Factory Use 18,125 18,125 18,700 18,720 19,115 (1000 MT) Consum. Feed Use Dom. 550 550 600 580 590 (1000 MT) Consum. Total Dom. 29,949 29,953 30,848 30,616 31,305 (1000 MT) Consumption Total Distribution 29,949 29,953 30,848 30,616 31,305 (1000 MT) Commodities: Dairy, Cheese Production: Note: There are no official statistics on production and consumption of cheese in Brazil. OAA production estimates for cheese are based on trade sources and also include ?informal? cheese production. Post forecasts cheese production in 2012 to increase by 3.7 percent boosted mostly by an estimated strong domestic demand for cheese, principally from the fast-food industry/sector. Also the recent mergers and consolidation in Brazil are forcing these companies to be more aggressive overseas. Post revised cheese production in CY 2011 which is estimated to increase by 4 percent compared to previous year due to higher industrial demand. Consumption: Post forecasts cheese consumption to increase by 3 percent in 2012 supported by firm consumer demand. Local companies are innovating and launching value added cheeses copying European style cheeses, they have also launched different varieties using buffalo milk, which is becoming popular too. Current Brazilian cheese consumption is estimated at 3.4 kilos per person per year below the recommended value by FAO which is 9 kilos/person/year. Human consumption of fresh cheese is expected to continue to increase in 2012. Mozzarella and ?queijo prato? accounted for more than 74 percent of unprocessed cheese retail value sales during 2010 and 2011. This type of cheese is very popular due to the tradition among Brazilians of eating cheese with French bread for breakfast or brunch. Prices Average wholesale prices of Brazilian-produced cheese by major types are: Type US$/Kilogram Minas (fresh farmer type) 16.80 Mozzarella 18.90 Provolone 27.90 Parmesan 52.85 Notes: (1) Prices for Sao Paulo market, as of 10/21/2011. (2) Average Exchange Rate for Oct 2011: US$ 1.00=R$1.60 Given further consolidation occurring within the drinking milk sector, the same trend is expected for cheese since many companies that produce long-life/UHT and fresh/pasteurized milk also manufacture cheese. As the major players in both areas strengthen their businesses through acquisitions or joint- ventures, this is likely to stimulate small and medium-sized companies into improving their operations by investing in machinery, extending distribution, reducing costs and diversifying the product portfolio. Trade: Exports of cheese are projected to increase by over 30 percent in 2012. Brazilian companies are becoming more aggressive in the international market. Cheese imports in 2012 are projected to drop 13 percent from 2011 level because dairy companies are expected to be less dependent on imported cheeses. The Brazilian government is likely to implement measures to protect the internal market against imports from Argentina and Uruguay. Such measures would be to establish the non-automatic licensing procedure for imports from those countries and establish import quotas. The strong domestic demand increased cheese imports by 32 percent in CY 2010. Argentina and Uruguay remain the main suppliers of cheese to Brazil, due to the preferential tariff treatment derived from the MERCOSUL agreement. Table 4 - Tariff Rate Table Tariff Product Description Rate Other Info Number (%) (HTS) CXT * 0406.10.10 Cheese, Mozzarella (1) 28 Mercosul: 27% 0406.10.90 Cheese, Other 16 Mercosul: zero 0406.20.00 Cheese: Grated or Powdered 16 Mercosul: Zero 0406.90.10 Cheese, with a fat content less than 36 %, by weight (1) 28 Mercosul: 27% 0406.90.20 Cheese with a fat content superior or equal to 36 % and less than 46%, by weight (1) 28 Mercosul: 27% * CXT: MERCOSUL Common External Tariff. The CXT tariff is applied to all imports other than from MERCOSUL. These tariffs are assessed on the CIF value of the product. Note (1): Effective June 1, 2001, these types of cheeses were included on the "exception list" of the Common External Tax (CXT), of the MERCOSUL, per Resolution 16/01, of the Foreign Trade Chamber (CAMEX), which altered Annex Two of the Decree Number 3,704 of December 27, 2000. The 27% tax is charged in addition to the Import Tariff of 16 percent for all imported cheeses, including MERCOSUL members. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: PSD: Dairy, Cheese 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Dairy, Cheese 2010 2011 2012 Brazil U S D A USDA USDA O sed ed fficial D Reviata P Official D Revis ata ost P Official Jan ost Data Data Data Data Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Production 648 648 675 675 700 (1000 MT) Other Imports 16 22 16 29 25 (1000 MT) Total Imports 16 22 16 29 25 (1000 MT) Total Supply 664 670 691 704 725 (1000 MT) Other Exports 4 4 5 3 4 (1000 MT) Total Exports 4 4 5 3 4 (1000 MT) Human Dom. 660 666 686 701 721 (1000 MT) Consumption Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Dom. 660 666 686 701 721 (1000 MT) Consumption Total Use 664 670 691 704 725 (1000 MT) Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Distribution 664 670 691 704 725 (1000 MT) Commodities: Dairy, Butter Production: Note: There are no official statistics on production and consumption of butter in Brazil. OAA production estimate for butter is based on trade sources, and also includes ?informal? butter production. Butter production is projected to increase by 2.5 percent in CY 2012, reflecting an increase in domestic demand, despite strong competition from margarine. Prices Type US$/kilogram Salted 15.00 Unsalted 13.50 Notes: (1) Prices for Sao Paulo market, as of 10/21/2011. (2) Average Exchange Rate for Oct 2011: US$ 1.00=R$1.60 Trade: Table 5 - Tariff Rate Table Tariff Number Product Description Rate (%) Other Info CXT * 0405.10.00 Butter 16 Mercosul: Zero 0405.90.10 Butter Oil 16 Mercosul: Zero * CXT: MERCOSUL Common External Tariff (CXT). The CXT tariff is applied to all imports other than from MERCOSUL. These tariffs are assessed on the CIF value of the product. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: PSD: Dairy, Butter 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 Da Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan iry, Butter Braz 2010 2011 2012 il USDA Official Old USDA Official USDA Data Post D Jan F eb ata Official Data Data Data Data Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Production 78 78 80 79 81 (1000 MT) Other Imports 8 2 9 0 1 (1000 MT) Total Imports 8 2 9 0 1 (1000 MT) Total Supply 86 80 89 79 82 (1000 MT) Other Exports 4 5 5 1 2 (1000 MT) Total Exports 4 5 5 1 2 (1000 MT) Domestic 82 76 84 78 80 (1000 MT) Consumption Total Use 86 81 89 79 82 (1000 MT) Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Distribution 86 81 89 79 82 (1000 MT) Commodities: Dairy, Powdered Milk (Whole Milk Powder and Non Fat Dry Milk) Production: Note: There are no official statistics on production and consumption of powdered milk in Brazil. OAA estimates for powdered milk production (nonfat and whole milk) are based on trade sources. Post forecasts total powdered milk (both whole milk and nonfat milk) production to increase by an average of 7 percent in 2012. The following factors support higher Brazilian powdered milk production in 2012: a. Two new plants entered into production and there are three new milk powder plants scheduled to enter into production, soon, which should increase overall production capacity. b. Higher sanitary standards for imported milk, combined with higher import tariffs and import procedures, which reduced imports of subsidized milk and led multinational and Brazilian companies to invest in domestic powdered milk production. c. Quotas for imported milk powder from Argentina d. Higher allocation of government funds for social programs at the federal and state levels. Whole milk powder (WMP) and non-fat dry milk (NFDM) production are forecast to increase 7.8 percent and 4.4 percent, respectively, in 2012 as the food processing industry continues to grow and increase their utilization. Consumption: Post forecasts 2012 powdered milk consumption to increase by 5 percent supported by higher domestic demand. Trade: Post projects a moderate growth in milk powder exports in 2012 according to trade sources. The domestic price for milk powder is around US$ 5,000.00/ton compared to US$ 4,000.00/ton in international markets which makes the Brazilian product not competitive overseas. Milk powder imports increased 180 percent during Jan-Aug 2011, compared to the same period 2010, mostly from Argentina and Uruguay. This forced the GOB to take measures to prevent higher dairy imports from these countries. The measures included the non-automatic licensing procedure for imports from those countries and establishing an import quota. The GOB limited Argentinean milk powder imports to 3,300 ton/month. The GOB reported that is likely to take the same measure against Uruguay. Trade analysts attribute this increase to the following factors: a) increase of domestic consumption; and, b) valuation of the Brazilian currency relative to the U.S. dollar in 2011. Argentina and Uruguay are the major suppliers of powdered milk to Brazil, accounting for 92 percent of total imports, comprised mostly of whole milk powder (73 percent of the total imported). The United States, which traditionally does not figure in the list of milk powder exporters to Brazil, contributed to 7 percent of non fat dry milk exports to Brazil. The United States continues to be competitive with other dairy categories, such as ingredients. Sweet whey powder imports from U.S totaled 12 percent and lactose imports totaled 61 percent in 2010. The other category in which United States is competitive is whey protein concentrates/isolate accounting for 85 percent of this market. Table 6 - Tariff Rate Table Tariff Number Product Description Rate (%) Other Info (HTS) CXT * 0402.21.10 Whole Milk Powder (1) 28 Mercosul: 27% 0402.21.20 Nonfat Milk, Powder (1) 28 Mercosul: 27% 0404.10.00 Whey Powder (2) 28 Mercosul: 27% * CXT: MERCOSUL Common External Tariff. This tariff is applied to all imports other than from MERCOSUL. These tariffs are assessed on the CIF value of the product. Notes: 1. Effective June 1, 2001, milk powder was included in the ?exception list? of the Common External Tariff (CXT), of the MERCOSUL, per Resolution 16/01, of the Foreign Trade Chamber (CAMEX), which altered Annex Two of the Decree Number 3.704 of December 27, 2000. The 27 percent tax is charged to all markets in addition to the import tariff of 16 percent to all markets, including MERCOSUL members. 2. Effective August 26, 2002, whey powder was included in the ?exception list? of the Common External Tariff (CXT), of MERCOSUL, per Resolution 21, of the Foreign Trade Chamber (CAMEX), published in the Diario Oficial (Brazil?s Federal Register) on August 26, 2002. The 27 percent tax is charged in addition to the Import Tariff of 14 percent to all markets, including MERCOSUL members. Stocks: There are no official government stocks of powdered milk in Brazil. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: PSD: Dairy, Dry Whole Milk Powder 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Dairy, Dry Whole Milk 2010 2011 2012 Powder Brazil U S D A O f f icial USDA Official USDA D Old ata P D Old ata Official Jan ost Post Data Data Data Data Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Production 500 500 510 510 550 (1000 MT) Other Imports 37 37 39 58 50 (1000 MT) Total Imports 37 37 39 58 50 (1000 MT) Total Supply 537 537 549 568 600 (1000 MT) Other Exports 6 5 10 2 3 (1000 MT) Total Exports 6 5 10 2 3 (1000 MT) Human Dom. 531 530 539 567 597 (1000 MT) Consumption Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Dom. 531 532 539 567 597 (1000 MT) Consumption Total Use 537 537 549 568 600 (1000 MT) Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Distribution 537 537 549 568 600 (1000 MT) PSD: Dairy, Nonfat Dry 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 Da Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan iry, Milk, Nonfat D 2010 2011 2012 ry Brazil USDA Official Old USDA Official USDA D Jan F eb ata Post Data Official Data Data Data Data Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Production 130 130 134 135 141 (1000 MT) Other Imports 10 14 10 25 22 (1000 MT) Total Imports 10 14 10 25 22 (1000 MT) Total Supply 140 144 144 160 163 (1000 MT) Other Exports 3 0 5 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Exports 3 0 5 0 0 (1000 MT) Human Dom. 137 144 139 160 163 (1000 MT) Consumption Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Dom. 137 144 139 160 163 (1000 MT) Consumption Total Use 140 144 144 160 163 (1000 MT) Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Distribution 140 144 144 160 163 (1000 MT)
Posted: 27 November 2011

See more from Food , Beverages and Tobacco in Brazil

Expert Views    
Opportunities in Health Food Sector   By U.S. Commercial Service Poland
Dairy and Products Annual   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Coffee Annual 2012   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Hot Tips    
Retail Food Sector in Brazil   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Poultry and Products in Brazil   By Foreign Agricultural Service