Fresh Deciduous Fruit Annual 2012

An Expert's View about Horticulture and Support Services in China

Posted on: 28 Nov 2012

China’s MY12/13 apple, pear and grape production is forecast to reach 38 million metric tons (MMT), 16.5 MMT, and 7.2 MMT, respectively.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 11/2/2012 GAIN Report Number: China - Peoples Republic of Fresh Deciduous Fruit Annual 2012 Approved By: Michael Riedel Prepared By: M. Melinda Meador, Ryan Scott, May Liu, and Wu Bugang Report Highlights: China’s MY12/13 apple, pear and grape production is forecast to reach 38 million metric tons (MMT), 16.5 MMT, and 7.2 MMT, respectively, on higher crop yields. U.S. apples face import permit delays due to China’s disease concerns but ongoing bilateral negotiations are addressing the issue. Pear imports remain negligible while grape imports are forecast up 20 percent to 180,000 metric tons. Chile is the dominant supplier of apples and grapes to China followed by the United States. China’s apple exports are expected to decline on continued weak world demand and high prices, with pear exports stable to Southeast Asia markets. Table grape exports are forecast to rise 5 percent. Commodities: Select Production: Apples Post forecasts China’s apple production at 38 million metric tons (MT) in marketing year (MY) 2012/13 (July-June), up nearly five percent from the revised MY 2011/12 production figure. Apple acreage is forecast at 2.2 million hectares in MY 2012/13, a one percent increase from the revised MY2011/12 estimate, with Fuji apples comprising 70 percent of the total crop. Favorable weather conditions in leading apple producing provinces and better crop management practices by China’s apple industry have improved fruit quality. China’s apple production continues to expand westward, into Shaanxi, Gansu and Xinjiang provinces, for example, where land is abundant and production costs are lower. In 2009, Shaanxi province became China’s largest apple producing province, surpassing eastern based Shandong province. As Shaanxi’s fruit-bearing trees have only reached 65 percent of total apple acreage, with 35 percent in new plantings, it will likely remain the dominant producer for the near future. Trade sources note that about 20 percent of Shandong’s apple trees are more than 25 years old with declining productivity. Before replacing apple trees, local experts encourage farmers to rotate the land with other crops like vegetables for three years. This method will promote the elimination of pests and diseases from the old apple trees. Apple Juice Concentrate Apple juice concentrate (AJC) production is forecast at 680,000 MT in MY 2012/13 (July-June), recovering nearly eight percent from the drop in MY2011/12 following a combination of weak global demand and high domestic production costs which depressed sales. More than 90 percent of China’s apple juice production is exported so rising global demand supports expected production increases. (See Exports) Pears China’s pear production is forecast at 16.5 MMT in MY 2012/13 (July-June), an increase of more than four percent from the revised MY 2011/12 production figure, as better crop management has bolstered yields. Pear acreage is forecast at 1.08 million hectares in MY 2012/13, reflecting a minimal decline from the revised MY 2011/12 figure. However, pear acreage is vulnerable to substitution to more profitable apple and grape crops. China-origin pears are primarily Asian varieties. Snowy pear, Ya pear, and Su pear remain the dominant varieties with Fragrant pear, Nanguo pear and other new varieties, like Huangguan, Cuiguan and Golden pears, gaining popularity among consumers. Some varieties are available in August, but the majority of pears are harvested in September. Grapes China’s table grape production is forecast at 7.2 MMT in MY2012/13 (June-May), a nine percent increase from MY2011/12, largely due to expanding acreage of new plantings. Table grapes are planted in almost all provinces in China with greenhouse production accounting for 10 percent. Traditional varieties include Kyoho and Muscat, with Red Globe, Thompson Seedless, and some local varieties becoming more popular. Harvest season is between June and September. Grape acreage is forecast at 633,000 hectares (including grapes for processing) in MY 2012/13, an upward shift of six percent from MY 2011/2012. Favorable profits over the past several seasons sparked planting expansion averaging 8-10 percent annually over that time period. Areas with strongest growth include western provinces like Xinjiang and Gansu due to suitable growing conditions for weather and land, southeast provinces such as Jiangsu and Zhejiang due to their close proximity to key consumption markets like Shanghai, and southern provinces, like Yunnan and Guangxi, due to easy export access to Southeast Asia. NOTE: The revised MY 2011/12 figures (except for table grape and AJC production) are based on reported data from China Agricultural Statistic Reports. (See Tables at the end of the report) Prices Apples In general, apples are held post harvest in cold storage to facilitate marketing at a favorable price. In MY 2011/12, however, consumers refused to pay high apple prices so traders had to sell their stocks at low prices before the new crop arrived. As a result, in MY 2012/13, traders are cautious about their purchasing decisions, despite increased domestic production and declining farm gate prices for their primary resource, Fuji apples. For example, in the western province of Gansu, Fuji farm gate prices dropped from RMB9.6 ($1.50) per kilo to RMB7.0 ($1.10). In Shaanxi (west) and Shandong (East) provinces, prices fell from RMB6.4 ($1.02) per kilo and RMB5.7 ($0.90) per kilo to RMB5.8 ($0.92) and RMB5.4 ($0.86), respectively. Pears Farm gate prices for pears have risen annually in response to increasing agricultural input (including fertilizers and pesticides) and labor costs but still remain below prices for apples and grapes. Prices for traditional varieties like Su pears are around RMB2.0 ($0.32) per kilo. Newer varieties like Fragrant pears are priced at nearly RMB6.0 ($0.95) per kilo. Grapes China produces numerous varieties of grapes with prices that vary throughout the country. For example, in the current market year, farm gate prices for Red Globe grapes are RMB7.4 ($1.20) per kilo in Yunnan (located in the Southwest), compared to RMB10 ($1.60) per kilo in Shandong (East). Consumption: China’s fruit consumption continues to grow along with rising income and dietary changes. Improvements to cold storage facilities have extended the supply season for fruits, thus further increasing fruit consumption levels. Apples and grapes remain popular among Chinese consumers. Trade: Imports Apple imports are forecast at 65,000 MT in MY 2012/13 (July-June), down 11 percent from the revised import figure from MY 2011/12, primarily due to China’s suspension of import permits for U.S. apples (see Trade Policy section). In MY 2011/12, the United States was the second largest supplier to China behind Chile with exports topping $51 million, up 50 percent from the previous year. Due to abundant domestic supply, pears imports to China remain negligible totaling 1,600 MT in MY 2011/12. Table grape imports are forecast at 180,000 MT in MY 2012/13 (June-May), a rapid increase of 20 percent from the revised MY2011/12 estimate, attributable to strong import demand for new varieties. Red Globe, Autumn Royal, Crimson Seedless, and Thompson Seedless are becoming more popular with Chinese consumers. The prime import season occurs between December and May when locally- produced grapes are in short supply and southern hemisphere producers like Chile, Peru and South Africa, enter the market. Chile is the dominant grape supplier to China, followed by the United States, which exported $87 million in table grapes to China in MY 11/12, up 19 percent. Exports Apple exports are forecast at 970,000 MT in MY 2012/13 (July-June), down four percent from the revised MY 2011/12 figure due to continued weak demand from traditional markets like Russia, neighboring Asian countries, and the Middle East. Moreover, higher production and distribution costs pushed export prices up by 30 percent to $1,034 per MT in September 2012, compared to the same period in 2011, further dampening export prospects. Apple juice concentrate exports are forecast at 600,000 MT in MY 2012/13 (July-June), a rebound of nine percent from the revised MY2011/12 figure due to slowly recovering world demand. In addition, lower crush apple prices this year, compared to last year, are expected to relieve pressure on AJC export prices, which were quoted at $1,968 per MT in September 2012, an increase of 14 percent from 2011. Pear exports are forecast at 420,000 MT in MY 2012/13 (July-June), roughly unchanged from the revised MY 2011/12 figure. Demand for China-origin pears remains stable with exports destined primarily for markets in southeast Asia. The average export price for Chinese pears was quoted at $776 per MT in September 2012, up 15 percent from the previous year. Table grape exports are forecast at 112,000 MT in MY 2012/13 (June-May), up nearly five percent from the revised MY 2011/12 estimate. Continued improvements to Yunnan’s production and quality of table grapes are expected to facilitate additional exports to Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia. NOTE: The revised MY2011/12 trade figures are based on official data from the Global Trade Atlas. Policy: Domestic Policy The central and provincial governments encourage farmers to standardize orchard construction and apply unified farming practices to enhance fruit quality. Some local governments will partially reimburse farmers for the construction costs of these demonstration farms. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, 600 standardized orchards were built in 2011 with an average size of 108 hectares. The central government continues its efforts to improve the deciduous fruit distribution system, including cold chain facilities. For example, in 2011, the Shaanxi provincial government committed to provide an RMB1.2 million ($190,550) per unit subsidy to farm cooperatives to build 300 air-controlled (AC) or cold storage units over a three year period. The program could increase total AC/cold storage capacity in Shaanxi province by 2.5 million MT. Trade Policy In September 2012, during an annual U.S.-China bilateral discussion China and the United States initialed a work plan allowing full market access for U.S. pears to China and China’s sand pears to the United States. The final work plan is expected to be formally signed at a later date. China’s General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) has not issued import permits for U.S. apples since the beginning of MY 2012/13 due to disease interceptions at China’s ports of entry. The United States is actively working with AQSIQ to resolve this issue. Marketing: General Market Overview The pace of China’s economic growth has slowed in 2012, but demand for high quality imported fresh deciduous fruit was not significantly impacted. In the first nine months of 2012, the import value of fresh fruit imports from the world was on a steady rise, up approximately 33 percent from the same period in 2011. The consumption of imported table grapes was up 26 percent, while the value of imported apples decreased 10 percent. However, U.S. table grape imports increased 44 percent, while U.S. apple imports were up 2 percent despite a 19 percent decrease from the lack of direct shipments to Shanghai as a result of stricter inspection procedures. Abundant domestic supplies plus increasing imports from Chile, France, Peru, South Africa, and New Zealand have created a new competitive market environment for U.S. fresh deciduous fruit in Mainland China. Record high retail prices for several U.S. fruit and new Chinese inspection procedures could impact future prospects for U.S. fresh deciduous fruit exports in 2013. Demand and consumption for imported fresh deciduous fruit is growing in China’s three major regions: South, East and North. The well-developed South China market maintains stable growth due to sustained promotional efforts and a 34-year tradition of consuming imported fruit. By the end of December 2011, Southern ports accounted for 83 percent of China’s total imports from the United States. All of the imported fresh fruit available in Western China (ATO’s Shanghai region) was transshipped via Guangzhou’s Jiangnan Wholesale Fruit Market. Direct shipments to Eastern and Northern China regions have decreased dramatically in the 2011-2012 season due to various factors. In the past three years, producer associations have undertaken aggressive marketing activities to help boost sales. Through a well-planned series of merchandising and training seminars designed for traders and retail managers as well as periodic in-store promotions, in 2012, U.S. fresh deciduous fruit exports sold in more supermarkets and at historic levels. Regional Markets: South China: The South remains the leading consumption market in China- holding its dominant position for the past three decades. In 2012, around 78 percent of total fresh fruit imports entered directly through ports located in the Pearl River Delta. Key consumption markets in South China include major cities in Guangdong Province’s Pearl River Delta such as Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Dongguan with the highest consumption, as well as secondary markets such as Foshan, Zhuhai, Zhongshan, Huizhou, Jiangmen, and Shunde. In addition to Guangdong Province, U.S. fresh fruit sales in Fuzhou, Xiamen, Changsha, and Nanning have sharply increased in the past three years. In South China, imported apples and grapes can be found not only in hypermarkets and supermarkets, but also in smaller-scale fruit retail chains with many still peddled in street stalls or residential neighborhoods. East and North China: The best venues for purchasing U.S. apples and table grapes in the East and North are the modern supermarket outlets. In the last two years, direct shipments to local ports were considered a cost efficient option as transportation costs (from South China) could be avoided altogether. However in the 2011-2012 marketing year, direct shipments of U.S. apples to these two regions dramatically declined mainly because local officials tightened inspection procedures at the port. U.S. Apples: China’s total imported apple consumption dropped 10 percent in the first nine months of 2012. Chile took the hardest hit-- a 22-percent decline in value when compared to the same period in 2011. However, U.S. apples maintained market position in 2012 with a total sales value of $31 million, accounting for 39 percent of China's total imported apple market share. 87 percent of these shipments were imported into Guangzhou, Huangpu and Shenzhen ports in the Pearl River Delta. Year-round availability of Washington State Red Delicious apples have entered modern retail outlets and neighborhood fruit stalls in China’s larger cities for years. Direct shipments to Shanghai fell by 19 percent. In 2011, China imported $50 million in U.S. apples or 43 percent of the total China imported apple market. In 2012, New Zealand and France provided more apples to China and together took 6 percent market share from the United States. New Zealand’s imports this past season provided alternative choices for local consumers, although the quality of the crop was poor and priced higher than U. S. Red Delicious apples. To remain competitive, traders and retailers have invested colorful packaging and promotional displays to differentiate themselves from competitors and attract new consumers. The best promotion season includes national holidays such as the Mid-Autumn Festival, National Holiday, and the Chinese Lunar New Year. U.S. Red Delicious apples are considered a preferred choice for gift-giving because their shiny dark red color and unique, uniform shape. Consumers in South China prefer smaller sized apples and the consumption demand remains strong, while consumers in North China prefer larger sized apple with no visible dents or imperfections. Consumers in East China purchase 88 heads Red Delicious apples almost exclusively. U.S. Table Grapes: In December 2011, the United States was the second largest table grape supplier to China, after Chile. China imported $36 million-worth in fresh grapes from United States. In the first nine months of 2012, these sales were up 26 percent from the same period in 2011. However by September 2012, for the first time, Peru and South Africa outpaced United States table grape exports. Although Peruvian grapes do not have official market access, exports totaled $57 million, up 44 percent from the same period in 2011. South Africa surpassed U.S. exports which is now the third largest grape supplier to China. South China remains China’s largest fresh table grape consumption region, followed by the East and North regions. South China accounted for 82 percent of China's total fresh grape imports ($324 million) in 2011. By September 2012, South China imported $263 million grapes from the world, up 22 percent from same period in 2011. A total of $30 million grapes were shipped from the United States to South China. Each year, over 80 percent of imported table grapes enter China through South China ports. Demand for U.S. seedless varieties continues to increase even though retail prices may be much higher than for seeded varieties. According to China Customs data, the total imported grape value from the United States increased 44 percent in the first nine months of 2012. In South China, table grapes are the favorite fruit purchased at grocery stores by local consumers. U.S. grapes are traditionally consumed in highest levels during the Mid-Autumn Festival (September) and National Day (October) holidays, while Chilean grape exporters target China’s Spring Festival (January or February). Red Globe is the most popular seeded variety holding the highest sales volume. Most retailers offer both imported grapes and domestic varieties. Although China produces Red Globes, U.S. varieties are firmer, larger, and taste better than the local varieties. Other varieties such as Scarlet Royal, Crimson are available in some niche markets in first tier cities. Thomson was replaced by a new Xinjiang Province variety called “Pearl”. Though the grapes are smaller in size, the Pearl variety has similar Brix levels as Thomson’s, but at half the price. According to the trade, the cost of importing U.S. seedless varieties has increased noticeably. The market situation in the North and East are distinct. North China is the key production region for table grapes and the price of domestic table grapes is much lower than that of the prices for imported grapes. Therefore, many North China traders complain that they could hardly earn a profit on U.S. table grapes. In East China more varieties are becoming available. Red Globe, Autumn Royal, Thompson and Crimson are being sold in high-end supermarkets with an average price that’s around 20 percent higher than the price in the South. According to wholesalers, table grape’s sales performance in East China is less than expected by the trade. Market Trends: • Online retail, television shopping and group purchasing, which was last year’s new trend for imported fresh deciduous fruit purchases in large cities has now peaked, with sales fairly stable in first tier cities (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen). With no clear dominant national player, it remains to be seen how these retail channels evolve in the different regions of China. • Specialized fresh fruit chain stores in major cities are expanding quickly and offer privately designed gift packages to consumers. Delivery services and payments are received upon delivery providing convenience to urban customers. • In order to maintain fresh fruit and to extend shelf life, many industry-insiders are increasing the use of cold storage management technologies and proper handling techniques. There is a range of central government policies supporting the development for new investments in refrigerated transportation and cold storage facilities. These supports come in the form of grants, preferential loans and tax credits. • Requests for direct farm purchasing are on the rise. Professional wholesale markets handle large quantities of imported fruits, while distributors collect various products and arrange for the distribution to retailers and end-users. Some retailers indicate an interest in buying direct, although it is questionable if they have the capacity (“relationships” at ports and know-how) to handle this complex business. Wholesale markets: Guangzhou’s Jiangnan Fruit Wholesale Market not only serves as a transshipment hub to other locations in China, but also a key national market index for fresh fruit pricing and demand. Other leading fruit wholesale markets in China include Longwu in Shanghai and Xinfadi Wholesale Market in Beijing. Many new modern wholesale markets are under constructions in secondary cities. With support from China’s Ministry of Commerce, these markets will be the beneficiaries of subsidies designated for the construction of refrigerated transportation and cold storage facilities. Market Tips: Suggestions for U.S. exporters who have an interest in entering the China market include: 1) Identify reliable local partners in each region: importers, logistics providers and retailers; 2) Assist and educate local partners on proper product handling; 3) Understand consumer preferences, which vary from region to region; 4) Differentiate the image of U.S. fruits from other competitors; 5) Provide assistance with promotional activities; and 6) Strengthen cold chain management practices to increase quality and extend shelve life. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 Apples, Fresh China M Market Year Begin: Jul arket Year Begin: Jul 2010 Market Year Begin: Jul 2011 2012 USDA USDA SDA O New Post fficial O New P U ost fficial O New Postfficial Area Planted 2,100,000 2,140,000 2,200,000 2,177,000 2,200,000 Area Harvested 0 0 0 0 0 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 33,263,000 33,263,000 35,000,000 35,985,000 38,000,000 Non-Comm. Production 0 0 0 0 0 Production 33,263,000 33,263,000 35,000,000 35,985,000 38,000,000 Imports 74,000 74,000 75,000 73,421 65,000 Total Supply 33,337,000 33,337,000 35,075,000 36,058,421 38,065,000 Fresh Dom. Consumption 26,520,300 26,520,332 28,975,000 30,646,763 32,335,000 Exports 1,056,700 1,056,668 1,100,000 1,011,658 970,000 For Processing 5,760,000 5,760,000 5,000,000 4,400,000 4,760,000 Withdrawal From Market 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 33,337,000 33,337,000 35,075,000 36,058,421 38,065,000 Pears, Fresh C 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 hina M Market Year Begin: Jul arket Year Begin: Jul 2010 Market Year Begin: Jul 2011 2012 USDA DA USDA O New P US ost fficial O New Post fficial O New Post fficial Area Planted 1,074,000 1,063,000 1,074,000 1,085,000 1,080,000 Area Harvested 0 0 0 0 0 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 15,057,000 15,057,000 15,600,000 15,800,000 16,500,000 Non-Comm. Production 0 0 0 0 0 Production 15,057,000 15,057,000 15,600,000 15,800,000 16,500,000 Imports 0 342 0 1,676 2,500 Total Supply 15,057,000 15,057,342 15,600,000 15,801,676 16,502,500 Fresh Dom. Consumption 13,514,100 13,514,466 14,080,000 14,118,988 14,732,500 Exports 422,900 422,876 400,000 418,688 420,000 For Processing 1,120,000 1,120,000 1,120,000 1,264,000 1,350,000 Withdrawal From Market 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 15,057,000 15,057,342 15,600,000 15,801,676 16,502,500 Grapes, Fresh C 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 hina M Market Year Begin: Jun arket Year Begin: Jun 2010 Market Year Begin: Jun 2011 2012 USDA O N DA USDA ew P USost st fficial O New Pofficial O New Post fficial Area Planted 532,800 552,000 600,000 597,000 633,000 Area Harvested 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 6,200,000 6,200,000 6,700,000 6,600,000 7,200,000 Non-Comm. Production 0 0 0 0 0 Production 6,200,000 6,200,000 6,700,000 6,600,000 7,200,000 Imports 118,400 118,400 167,500 149,521 180,000 Total Supply 6,318,400 6,318,400 6,867,500 6,749,521 7,380,000 Fresh Dom. Consumption 6,230,100 6,230,100 6,761,700 6,643,619 7,268,000 Exports 88,300 88,300 105,800 105,902 112,000 For Processing 0 0 0 0 0 Withdrawal From Market 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 6,318,400 6,318,400 6,867,500 6,749,521 7,380,000 Apple Juice, Concentrated C 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 hina Market Year Begin: Jul Market Year Begin: Jul Market Year Begin: Jul 2010 2011 2012 USDA O New P USDA ost N USDA ew Post New Post fficial Official Official Deliv. To Processors 5,760,000 4,400,000 4,760,000 Beginning Stocks 0 0 20,000 Production 820,000 630,000 680,000 Imports 36 63 80 Total Supply 820,036 630,063 700,080 Exports 768,719 549,703 600,000 Domestic Consumption 51,317 60,360 65,000 Ending Stocks 0 20,000 35,080 Total Distribution 820,036 630,063 700,080 Author Defined: Tables Table 1: China Apple Production (1000 Ha and MT) by Province 2007-2011 Province 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT ha ha ha ha ha Shaanxi 484.9 7,015,68 530.9 7,455,05 564.9 8,051,72 601.5 8,560,13 623.2 9,029,31 2 4 8 2 6 Shandong 304.9 7,249,22 276.3 7,631,76 270.4 7,710,49 264.6 7,988,40 276.3 8,379,37 7 8 7 5 8 Henan 182.3 3,523,31 173.1 3,743,91 175.7 3,886,25 177.6 4,089,64 180.5 4,203,23 0 7 3 7 5 Shanxi 144.3 1,872,68 148.2 2,228,78 145.2 2,384,75 137.6 2,566,47 144.7 3,339,39 1 9 5 2 0 Hebei 250.0 2,478,84 243.8 2,615,98 235.5 2,767,97 265.4 2,724,61 236.7 2,926,42 5 2 3 4 5 Liaoning 107.1 1,514,87 114.0 1,709,13 121.9 1,948,10 125.9 2,094,71 134.0 2,396,80 1 8 0 9 5 Gansu 247.6 1,424,25 246.5 1,641,35 261.6 1,856,20 268.6 2,016,60 274.8 2,276,00 3 2 4 9 3 Xinjiang 32.5 388,881 38.5 435,392 55.3 535,058 73.3 658,728 83.3 715,136 Jiangsu 35.1 618,453 34.8 575,299 34.8 572,333 34.0 566,332 35.8 616,738 Sichuan 27.8 296,977 28.6 389,048 28.6 408,938 29.2 429,339 30.5 456,775 Anhui 13.3 403,627 17.1 304,886 16.1 368,978 16.8 406,858 16.8 411,238 Ningxia 21.5 275,525 31.5 283,461 33.5 327,487 40.4 354,421 40.5 408,903 Yunnan 31.1 234,855 29.9 267,954 30.5 269,289 30.9 257,908 31.9 252,886 Jilin 14.2 133,153 14.5 135,219 13.4 145,764 13.7 153,521 12.8 144,152 Heilongjia 13.2 150,534 12.0 138,330 12.0 140,670 11.4 117,019 10.9 113,984 ng Inner 21.3 61,672 23.1 69,919 22.6 78,576 26.35 77,676 18.9 105,730 Mongolia Beijing 10.3 119,459 9.2 120,543 8.2 119,676 8.1 103,772 7.8 104,626 Tianjin 5.5 59,709 5.4 62,946 5.3 63,405 4.7 55,512 4.5 55,256 Guizhou 6.4 11,023 6.3 12,182 6.9 16,177 6.6 15,475 6.5 21,668 Hubei 3.0 10,351 3.3 8,881 2.2 11,445 1.7 9,672 1.9 9,903 Qinghai 2.7 5,804 2.5 5,823 2.5 5,729 2.1 5,738 2.0 5,773 Chongqin 1.8 6,693 1.6 5,831 2.0 6,887 1.6 5,287 1.4 5,711 g Tibet 1.0 3,994 1.1 4,423 0.1 4,427 1.4 5,124 1.4 5,453 Fujian N/A 201 N/A 310 N/A 300 N/A 309 N/A 306 Shanghai N/A 154 N/A 162 N/A 139 N/A N/A N/A 42 National 1,961 27,859,9 1,992 29,846,6 2,049 31,680,7 2139. 33,263,2 2,177 35,984,8 Total .8 35 .2 09 .1 88 9 90 .3 32 Source: China Agriculture Statistical Report Table 2: Pear Production (1000 Ha and MT) by Province 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Province 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT ha ha ha ha ha Hebei 200.9 3,459,77 197.7 3,539,67 194.1 3,640,68 189.2 3,758,28 193.4 4,068,62 2 9 2 7 9 Liaoning 79.6 762,452 83.2 937,944 97.9 1,103,50 98.6 1,261,40 98.8 1,401,58 9 2 6 Shandong 54.9 1,172,16 48.8 1,190,41 45.2 1,166,31 42.5 1,112,09 43.8 1,227,38 2 3 7 9 0 Henan 43.2 799,939 46.0 876,538 47.1 922,590 47.3 946,619 49.6 1,005,02 7 Anhui 36.4 929,719 39.5 628,895 38.5 867,949 38.1 966,259 36.5 1,004,35 1 Sichuan 82.3 819,776 83.3 821,316 84.0 845,236 82.7 873,351 81.9 923,356 Shaanxi 55.1 618,962 52.2 854,119 51.6 629,939 49.0 799,909 49.2 881,483 Jiangsu 36.4 627,634 36.7 639,385 37.3 662,410 37.8 669,130 39.5 729,747 Xinjiang 70.5 541,451 73.1 692,831 69.5 874,988 68.8 1,052,85 69.9 605,731 4 Shanxi 31.1 326,969 30.7 378,518 31.1 479,790 28.1 342,203 33.5 590,119 Hubei 35.5 493,185 35.4 473,326 38.2 468,461 32.2 480,523 48.8 462,901 Zhejiang 27.9 360,524 27.5 375,587 25.4 382,379 24.9 379,297 24.4 385,684 Yunnan 43.4 240,519 46.9 286,850 48.3 278,681 51.6 332,044 48.9 364,142 Gansu 46.8 294,239 44.4 285,490 35.6 320,461 34.5 334,180 33.3 333,848 Chongqin 30.8 206,088 32.7 235,587 35.4 259,982 35.2 294,381 35.9 303,782 g Guangxi 18.0 156,428 18.6 181,679 18.9 193,990 19.8 222,572 20.7 241,557 Fujian 22.3 164,479 22.1 169,303 22.4 183,967 21.9 185,345 22.0 197,218 Guizhou 38.5 148,008 41.3 162,872 43.6 167,719 44.5 182,099 45.4 195,363 Beijing 10.4 154,368 10.4 151,643 9.8 155,889 9.2 158,632 9.1 161,712 Hunan 36.9 133,225 30.7 125,529 30.8 128,561 32.2 154,630 33.1 150,889 Jiangxi 23.5 89,012 26.1 113,715 26.2 117,653 25.7 116,830 26.5 134,816 Jilin 16.0 129,540 16.6 147,119 15.4 142,198 15.9 141,429 14.8 133,163 Inner 8.9 85,216 9.7 86,612 7.9 78,399 7.9 80,319 5.8 77,229 Mongolia Guangdo 7.0 51,035 7.3 46,365 7.4 55,116 7.6 62,232 7.7 73,849 ng Heilongjia 5.1 46,524 5.3 47,078 4.2 41,164 4.8 37,648 4.6 40,224 ng Tianjin 36.4 28,870 3.4 29,774 3.6 33,131 3.8 35,701 3.7 39,276 Shanghai 2.0 31,855 1.9 30,961 1.9 32,733 2.0 38,427 1.8 31,671 Ningxia 2.7 17,174 2.3 23,194 2.3 22,831 2.2 33,016 2.3 28,900 Qinghai 1.1 4,894 0.9 4,680 0.9 4,835 0.8 4,428 0.8 N/A Tibet 0.1 987 N/A 1,140 N/A 1,420 0.1 1,228 0.1 1,170 National 1,071 12,895,0 1,074 13,538,1 1,074 14,262,9 1,063 15,057,0 1,085 15,794,8 Total 3 05 .5 42 .3 79 .1 84 .5 01 Source: China Agricultural Statistical Report Table 3: Grape Production (1000 Ha and MT) by Province 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Province 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT ha ha ha ha ha Xinjiang 109. 1,654,58 108. 1,648,71 114. 1,932,15 125. 1,965,69 135. 1,754,72 6 1 8 8 7 7 3 5 5 5 Hebei 57.9 946,886 61.0 988,071 63.4 1,050,80 70.4 1,075,46 73.7 1,125,48 2 8 1 Shandong 44.2 917,312 36.7 904,759 37.9 935,686 35.9 957,825 35.8 985,070 Liaoning 25.2 493,775 26.6 614,422 26.8 642,124 26.6 634,296 27.4 672,695 Zhejiang 12.1 269,051 14.6 332,472 17.0 390,359 20.0 425,866 22.5 527,356 Henan 26.2 419,473 26.8 437,329 29.6 461,083 29.9 484,130 30.2 500,852 Jiangsu 12.7 202,401 14.9 242,747 18.1 278,506 21.7 331,877 25.4 392,234 Shaanxi 15.1 185,261 17.7 216,562 23.9 258,829 28.8 322,292 31.6 363,839 Yunnan 7.0 93,800 7.9 128,449 9.6 167,090 12.3 205,992 19.2 356,139 Guangxi 11.1 158,873 11.6 170,750 12.9 180,790 17.2 232,009 20.7 272,250 Shanxi 9.8 10.1 116,618 10.3 129,413 9.6 219,513 9.7 259,294 Anhui 5.2 178,298 6.2 182,011 6.8 214,046 9.4 261,114 9.6 259,177 Sichuan 13.4 180,134 14.8 201,673 16.2 206,370 18.2 216,500 20.7 243,379 Hubei 5.7 86,313 5.9 98,467 6.2 123,644 5.6 131,213 8.5 151,896 Jilin 11.1 138,885 12.4 131,940 11.2 144,685 11.8 152,573 12.2 142,394 Ningxia 10.2 70,576 14.0 97,033 20.2 115,827 28.7 137,640 27.1 140,965 Gansu 10.2 105,950 11.0 99,601 13.4 116,185 18.4 128,370 20.8 124,666 Tianjin 5.4 109,545 5.1 99,959 5.2 104,560 5.3 103,322 5.2 122,956 Hunan 18.9 73,180 14.5 73,365 15.2 83,892 16.7 100,776 20.1 118,860 Fujian 5.2 86,808 5.5 95,912 5.6 98,817 5.8 100,171 6.3 111,966 Shanghai 2.7 45,682 3.8 62,508 4.2 77,123 4.4 90,814 4.6 95,429 Guizhou 5.9 32,793 6.5 36,182 7.6 41,734 9.5 46,714 11.1 80,351 Inner 4.8 40,989 4.8 40,644 6.0 46,983 7.6 53,148 7.4 74,116 Mongolia Heilongjian 1.8 21,847 2.7 45,062 2.5 42,206 3.0 56,732 3.0 62,120 g Chongqing 2.7 22,666 2.5 24,711 3.9 31,124 4.7 43,261 5.6 54,055 Beijing 2.7 47,486 3.0 45,112 2.7 40,618 2.7 42,140 3.0 41,552 Jiangxi 12.7 9,614 1.9 16,012 2.4 24,564 2.5 29,001 N/A 33,152 Tibet 0.1 250 N/A 289 N/A 1,286 12.3 377 N/A 399 Qinghai N/A 112 N/A 106 N/A 109 0.1 117 0.1 97 National 438. 6,696,81 451. 7,151,48 493. 7,940,61 552. 8,548,94 596. 9,067,46 Total 4 4 2 4 4 2 0 6 9 4
Posted: 28 November 2012

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