Fresh Deciduous Fruit Annual

An Expert's View about Pome Fruits (such as apples or pears) and Stone Fruits (such as peaches, cherries, etc.) in China

Posted on: 25 Dec 2011

China’s apple production is forecast at 35 million metric tons (MMT) for marketing year (MY) 2011/12 (July-June), up five percent from the previous year. Production for apple juice concentrate (AJC) i

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 12/02/2011 GAIN Report Number: 11057 China - Peoples Republic of Fresh Deciduous Fruit Annual Annual Approved By: Scott Sindelar Prepared By: Ryan R. Scott, May Liu, and Wu Bugang Report Highlights: China’s apple production is forecast at 35 million metric tons (MMT) for marketing year (MY) 2011/12 (July- June), up five percent from the previous year. Production for apple juice concentrate (AJC) is forecast at 600,000 MT in 2011/12 (July-June), a 15 percent decrease from the revised MY 2010/11 estimate and largely due to lesser supplies of low quality apples and higher prices associated with juice production. Commodities: Apples, Fresh Apple Juice, Concentrated Pears, Fresh Grapes, Table, Fresh Production: Apples China’s apple production is forecast at 35 million metric tons (MMT) for marketing year (MY) 2011/12 (July- June), up five percent from the previous year. Most of the major producers are anticipating a greater crop (see table 1). Post has revised the MY2010/11 estimate to 33.3MMT based on official data. Apple acreage is forecast at 2.2 million hectares in MY 2011/12, an increase of three percent from the previous year. Acreage expansion is taking place in western provinces such as Shaanxi, Gansu, Xinjiang and Ningxia where there is more arable land for planting and cheaper labor costs compared to the eastern provinces where acreage is gradually decreasing due to more profitable fruit crops like cherries. China’s top seven provinces account for nearly 85 percent of production and 90 percent of planted acreage (see Table 1). For varieties, Fuji apples account for 70 percent; Guoguang, Gala, Red Delicious, Qingguan, and Meiba account for the remaining 30 percent. Overall, fruit quality in China is improving because of its enhanced management efforts. Labor and production costs are higher priced than previous years. For instance, in Shandong province, a laborer is paid 100 yuan ($15.6) per day to work on bagging or harvest, which is up 25 percent from the previous year. Production costs, including fuel cost and agriculture inputs (fertilizer and pesticides) have also increased. Pears Pear production is forecast at 15.6 MMT in MY 2011/12 (July-June), up nearly four percent from the revised number of 15.0 MMT in the previous year, mainly due to favorable weather conditions in major producing provinces. Planted acreage is slightly down by one percent to 1.05 million hectares in MY 2011/12 (see Table 2). Like apples, key producing provinces are gradually switching to more profitable crops like grapes, cherries, or nectarines. Asian pear varieties still dominate China’s production and include Su pear, Ya pear, Snow pear, Jianbai, Cuiguan, Fengshui, Golden pear, Nanguo and Fragrant pear. Grapes Table grape production is forecast at 6.7 MMT in MY 2011/12 (June-May), an increase of eight percent from the previous year, primarily due to increased plantings across China (see Table 3). China’s grape acreage is expected to increase by nine percent to 600,000 hectares (including grapes used for processing) in MY 2011/12. Area expansion is mainly occurring in Xinjiang, Hebei, Zhejiang, Gansu, Shaanxi, and Guangxi provinces. Unlike apples and pears, some grapes are grown in greenhouses (particularly in Zhejiang and Jiangsu) to reduce pest damages. AJC Apple juice concentrate (AJC) production is forecast at 600,000 MT in MY 2011/12 (July-June), down 15 percent from the revised number of over 700,000 MT in MY 2010/11, due to lesser supplies of low quality apples and higher prices associated with juicing apples. As apple quality improves, more apples are being devoted to the fresh consumption market. Currently, in Shaanxi, apples used for juices are priced at nearly 1,600 Yuan ($252) per MT, up more than 50 percent last year, making the cost of apples for one MT of AJC reach $1,900. Reportedly, China has “zero” carry-in stocks to MY2011/12 production, which will keep prices elevated above record levels. With 90 percent of its production exported, China is the world largest AJC supplier. Prices Farm gate prices for top grade apples remain unchanged at 5.6-6.4 yuan ($0.88-$1.00) per kilo in Shandong compared to the same time last year. During MY 2010/11, many traders and affluent buyers stockpiled apples in cold storage facilities in anticipation of high profits. As expected, apple prices reached record high levels; but, to everyone’s surprise, there was no demand to support high prices, so prices fell quickly to as low as 4.0 yuan ($0.63) after the Lunar New Year in February 2011. The large quantities of apples kept in storage remained unsold before the harvest of new crop in July; so, as a result, many traders suffered huge losses and are now very cautious about making offers. Over the past few years, grape prices have been relatively high, but, in this marketing year, increased production is closer to matching domestic demand, so escalating prices have been slowing down. In Xinjiang, the largest grape producer, farm gate prices in MY 2010/11 for top-grade Red Globes at harvest were sold at 5.8 yuan ($0.91) per kilo compared to this year’s price of 3.8 yuan ($0.6). In MY2011/12, prices for pears are also expected to remain relatively strong. Xinjiang-origin fragrant pears are popular and priced higher than other Asian varieties. Top-grade fragrant pears were priced at 8.8-9.3 yuan ($1.39-1.47) per kilo at harvest, which is 50 percent higher than the previous year and mainly due to smaller production. Trade: Import Apple imports are forecast at 80,000 MT in MY 2011/12 (July-June), up eight percent from the previous year, due to firm demand for high quality fruit products. Chile and the U.S. are two major suppliers of imported apples. Table grape imports are forecast at 150,000 MT in MY 2011/12 (June-May), up 27 percent from the previous year, due to strong demand during the off-season. The Chinese New Year- falls in either January or February when exportable supplies of grapes are available from Southern Hemisphere countries. Chile remains the largest grape exporter to China, followed by the United States and Peru. Imports of fresh pears are forecast at 500 MT in MY 2011/12 (July-June), up 46 percent from the previous year. After China and Belgium signed a protocol on May 18, 2010 to officially grant Belgian pears access to China market, the import volume jumped to 342 MT in MY 2010/11. Export Apple exports are forecast at 110,000 MT in MY 2011/12, up four percent from the previous year. Demand for lower grade apples from Russia and Southeast Asian countries continue to be strong, in spite of higher export prices. Pear exports are forecast at 400,000 MT in MY 2011/12, down more than five percent from the previous year. The current export price is quoted at $675 per MT, an increase of more than 20 percent from last year. Demand from neighboring countries for China-origin pears has been quite stable, but, increased purchase prices coupled with local currency appreciation would further lift export prices and dampen purchases from ASEAN countries. Grape exports are forecast at 115,000 MT, up 30 percent from last year, mainly due to strong demand from Russia and neighboring Asian countries and China’s improved grape quality, production, and distribution system (including cold storage facilities). Policy: Apples: To help limit the rapid expansion of concentrate juicing facilities, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology recently issued the Access Requirements for Concentrated Fruit and Vegetable Juice (Nectar) Industry with the adoption on October 1, 2011. The regulation states that newly established concentrated juicing facilities must strictly follow industry policies and development plans and must not be built within 50 kilometers of similar facilities. China’s capacity for apple juice concentrate has been expanding over recent years and industry sources indicate that current AJC processing capacity has exceeded its limit of 1.5 MMT. This excessive capacity has led to fierce competition for raw supplies and huge waste of resources, making China’s AJC industry less competitive against processors in other parts of the world. The State Council recently discussed ways of reducing costs for distribution of fresh and raw agricultural products. Initiatives include building charity wholesale markets and wet markets at both production and consumption areas, encouraging private sector investment in the distribution system, and reducing or waiving rent and administrative fees at particular markets. No final decision has been made on the timing of implementation. Pears: Local governments in less developed western provinces are providing more support to fruit production, than coastal, central or northern provinces. Building demonstration farms is seen as one of the effective tools to help teach farmers how to produce safe and quality fruit to meet market demand and generate additional income. In Shaanxi province, for example, the local government in Weinan is building a 333-hectare grape industrial park, which will include a grape production demonstration farm, a processing and storage commercial zone, and a cultural and tourist park. With a projected investment of 250 million yuan ($39.4 million) by the government and private sector, the project is aimed at showcasing grape varieties, new production technologies, and standardized farming practices. The target is to build a production base (that covers nearly 13,350 hectare of land) with an industrial park as a centerpiece within the next three to five years. Local governments in many other provinces have built similar demonstration farms. In Dangshan of Anhui province, the local government provides pear farmers with 3,000 yuan ($473) of agriculture input subsidies to build demonstration farms. Marketing: Freshness, taste, health benefits, and price are the key factors influencing consumer preference with regards to fresh fruit. Online sales and group purchasing will likely become a new trend in fresh deciduous fruit consumption especially in large cities such as Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Beijing, and Shanghai. Specialized fresh fruit chain stores are expanding quickly and offer privately designed gift packages to consumers. Delivery service and payment upon receiving fresh fruits provide their consumers both confidence and convenience. Television shopping is another new platform for promoting U.S. fruits. China’s imported fruit market can be divided into three regions: South, East, and North. South China, in particular Guangzhou, is the most mature market and has been the hub for imported fruit for over twenty-seven years. Proximity to Hong Kong helps enhance Guangzhou’s role in promoting imported fresh fruit. Direct shipments into Mainland China are increasing but still remain limited. The Jiangnan Fruit and Vegetable Wholesale Market in Guangzhou is the largest wholesale market in China in terms of total sales and volume of imported fruit transactions. Industry sources estimate that 60-70 percent of China’s entire imported fruits pass through this market, with expansion plans are in process. About 50 percent of those imports are consumed in Guangdong Province alone. Key consumption markets in South China include major cities in the Pearl River Delta such as Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Dongguan as well as emerging city markets such as Foshan, Zhuhai, Zhongshan, Huizhou, Jiangmen, and Shunde. U.S. fresh fruit sales in the cities of Fuzhou, Xiamen, and Changsha have dramatically increased in the past two years. More marketing activities have focused on the emerging East and North markets in the past three years, while the well-developed South China market maintains its stable growth. Through training seminars designed for traders and retail managers, in-store promotions can be more easily carried out and improving on display and on building the generic U.S. fresh fruit brand. In the East, Shanghai is the leading consumption center while other emerging markets in the East include Nanjing, Hangzhou, Wenzhou, and Wuhan. In North China, Dalian and Qingdao are emerging markets in addition to Beijing. Direct shipments to local ports help reduce transportation costs and facilitate trade. The Longwu Fruit and Vegetable Wholesale Market in Shanghai and the Xinfadi Wholesale Market in Beijing are two other key hubs for the imported fruit trade in the East and North. Many of China’s wholesale markets are expected to upgrade their facilities and image over the next few years. In order to maintain fruits fresh and to extend their shelf life, many industry-insiders are increasing their use of cold storage management technologies and knowledge of proper handling. Central government subsidy backed policies, support new investment in strengthening the cold chain. Strong demand and fierce competition is encouraging retailers to find ways to differentiate themselves from competitors. Professional wholesale markets handle large quantities of imported fruits while distributors collect various products and arrange for the distribution to retailers and end-users. The best venues for U.S. apples and table grapes in the East and North are the modern retail outlets. In the South, imported apples and grapes can be found not only in hypermarkets and supermarkets, but also at many smaller scale fruit chains as well as being peddled in street stalls. U.S. Apples Washington State Red Delicious apples, available year-round in the market, enter modern retail venues and neighborhood fruit stalls in China’s larger cities. Red Delicious was considered a preferred choice for gift-giving because it’s shiny dark red color and unique, uniform shape. These are most commonly offered as gifts during national holidays such as the Mid-Autumn Festival, National Holiday, Spring Festival, and other special occasions. Consumers in the North prefer bigger size apple with good appearance. Consumers in Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing, prefer 88 heads red delicious apples only. The popularity of Gala and Granny Smith continues to grow. These two varieties are not allowed market access into China. Though the import cost for Gala and Granny Smith apples remain high, consumers have shown willingness to pay for better quality apples, which are mostly available from August through March. In 2010, total U.S. apple export value to China and Hong Kong region from the States reached $62 million with direct shipments valued at $8 million. U.S. Table Grapes In 2010, the total table grape export value from United States to China and Hong Kong region reached $92 million, up 19 percent. For many Southern Chinese consumers, the favorite fruit to purchase at grocery stores is Table Grapes. Key exporting countries are the United States, Chile, Mexico, and Peru. U.S. grapes are consumed mainly during the Mid-Autumn Festival (September) and National Day (October) holidays, while Chilean grape exporters target China’s Spring Festival (January or February). South China remains China’s largest fresh table grape consumption region, followed by the East and North regions. Each year, over 80 percent of imported table grapes enter China through South China ports. A large volume of California table grapes enter the Guangdong market via Hong Kong, Vietnam, and Taiwan. Demand for U.S. seedless varieties continues to increase even though the retail price may be much higher than seeded varieties. Red Globe is the most popular seeded variety holding the highest sales volume. Most retailers offer both imported grapes and domestic varieties. Although China produces a large amount of Red Globes, U.S. grapes are firmer, larger, and taste better than the local product. Other varieties such as Scarlet Royal, Crimson and Thomson are gaining ground in some niche markets. However, the situation in the North and East are different. North China is the key production region for table grapes. In that region, the price of domestic table grapes is as low as one-sixth of the price of imported grapes; many traders in the North complained that they could hardly earn a profit on US table grapes. In the East, more varieties are becoming available. In addition to Red Globe, Autumn Royal, Thompson and Crimson are gaining popularity. Small volume of Champagne was introduced to high-end retail store. U.S. Pears In 2010, total export of pears and quinces from United States to China and Hong Kong region valued at $3 million. Though U.S. pears do not have an official market access to China, they are readily available in the market. However, the volume is limited and the quality is unstable. China also produces pears; some local consumers prefer crispy and sweet varieties instead of soft varieties. Tables 1: China Apple Production (1000 Ha and MT) by Province 2006-2010 Province 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT ha ha ha ha ha Shaanxi 462.2 6,499,75 484.9 7,015,68 530.9 7,455,05 564.9 8,051,72 601.5 8,560,1 5 2 4 8 32 Shandong 311.1 6,930,49 304.9 7,249,22 276.3 7,631,76 270.4 7,710,49 264.6 7,988,4 2 7 8 7 05 Henan 167.7 3,227,88 182.3 3,523,31 173.1 3,743,91 175.7 3,886,25 177.6 4,089,6 5 0 7 3 47 Hebei 253.1 2,357,62 250.0 2,478,84 243.8 2,615,98 235.5 2,767,97 265.4 2,724,6 0 5 2 3 14 Shanxi 146.0 1,867,04 144.3 1,872,68 148.2 2,228,78 145.2 2,384,75 137.6 2,566,4 9 1 9 5 72 Liaoning 109.1 1,301,39 107.1 1,514,87 114.0 1,709,13 121.9 1,948,10 125.9 2,094,7 9 1 8 0 19 Gansu 207.4 1,254,14 247.6 1,424,25 246.5 1,641,35 261.6 1,856,20 268.6 2,016,6 1 3 2 4 09 Xinjiang 31.1 327,886 32.5 388,881 38.5 435,392 55.3 535,058 73.3 658,728 Jiangsu 36.5 572,600 35.1 618,453 34.8 575,299 34.8 572,333 34.0 566,332 Sichuan 26.2 248,022 27.8 296,977 28.6 389,048 28.6 408,938 29.2 429,339 Anhui 13.4 341,828 13.3 403,627 17.1 304,886 16.1 368,978 16.8 406,858 Ningxia 20.3 200,694 21.5 275,525 31.5 283,461 33.5 327,487 40.4 354,421 Yunnan 30.3 201,962 31.1 234,855 29.9 267,954 30.5 269,289 30.9 257,908 Jilin 17.7 268,055 14.2 133,153 14.5 135,219 13.4 145,764 13.7 153,521 Heilongjia 13.3 159,759 13.2 150,534 12.0 138,330 12.0 140,670 11.4 117,019 ng Beijing 9.5 131,071 10.3 119,459 9.2 120,543 8.2 119,676 8.1 103,772 Inner 22.9 65,961 21.3 61,672 23.1 69,919 22.6 78,576 26.35 77,676 Mongolia Tianjin 6.2 64,076 5.5 59,709 5.4 62,946 5.3 63,405 4.7 55,512 Guizhou 6.0 10,628 6.4 11,023 6.3 12,182 6.9 16,177 6.6 15,475 Hubei 3.2 11,866 3.0 10,351 3.3 8,881 2.2 11,445 1.7 9,672 Qinghai 2.9 5,939 2.7 5,804 2.5 5,823 2.5 5,729 2.1 5,738 Chongqin 1.7 6,326 1.8 6,693 1.6 5,831 2.0 6,887 1.6 5,287 g Tibet 1.0 3,934 1.0 3,994 1.1 4,423 0.1 4,427 1.4 5,124 Fujian 0.0 189 N/A 201 N/A 310 N/A 300 N/A 309 Shanghai 0.0 158 N/A 154 N/A 162 N/A 139 N/A N/A Total 1,898. 26,059,2 1,961. 27,859,9 1,992. 29,846,6 2,049. 31,680,7 2139. 332632 8 98 8 35 2 09 1 88 9 90 Source: China Agriculture Statistical Report Table 2: Pear Production (1000 Ha and MT) by Province 2006-2010 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Province 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT ha ha ha ha ha Hebei 215.0 3,334,97 200. 3,459,77 197.7 3,539,67 194.1 3,640,68 189.2 3,758,28 2 9 2 9 2 7 Liaoning 87.7 705,232 79.6 762,452 83.2 937,944 97.9 1,103,50 98.6 1,261,40 9 2 Shandong 59.6 1,103,48 54.9 1,172,16 48.8 1,190,41 45.2 1,166,31 42.5 1,112,09 1 2 3 7 9 Xinjiang 69.2 435,203 70.5 541,451 73.1 692,831 69.5 874,988 68.8 1,052,85 4 Anhui 37.4 803,652 36.4 929,719 39.5 628,895 38.5 867,949 38.1 966,259 Henan 41.1 695,950 43.2 799,939 46.0 876,538 47.1 922,590 47.3 946,619 Sichuan 80.5 746,048 82.3 819,776 83.3 821,316 84.0 845,236 82.7 873,351 Shaanxi 60.4 650,028 55.1 618,962 52.2 854,119 51.6 629,939 49.0 799,909 Jiangsu 40.2 614,252 36.4 627,634 36.7 639,385 37.3 662,410 37.8 669,130 Hubei 38.1 518,020 35.5 493,185 35.4 473,326 38.2 468,461 32.2 480,523 Zhejiang 26.5 329,753 27.9 360,524 27.5 375,587 25.4 382,379 24.9 379,297 Shanxi 29.6 184,207 31.1 326,969 30.7 378,518 31.1 479,790 28.1 342,203 Gansu 48.4 314,798 46.8 294,239 44.4 285,490 35.6 320,461 34.5 334,180 Yunnan 41.7 216,936 43.4 240,519 46.9 286,850 48.3 278,681 51.6 332,044 Chongqin 29.0 171,962 30.8 206,088 32.7 235,587 35.4 259,982 35.2 294,381 g Guangxi 17.8 135,582 18.0 156,428 18.6 181,679 18.9 193,990 19.8 222,572 Fujian 22.4 152,309 22.3 164,479 22.1 169,303 22.4 183,967 21.9 185,345 Guizhou 36.8 139,412 38.5 148,008 41.3 162,872 43.6 167,719 44.5 182,099 Beijing 11.0 153,566 10.4 154,368 10.4 151,643 9.8 155,889 9.2 158,632 Hunan 30.9 117,613 36.9 133,225 30.7 125,529 30.8 128,561 32.2 154,630 Jilin 17.1 137,690 16.0 129,540 16.6 147,119 15.4 142,198 15.9 141,429 Jiangxi 26.7 80,651 23.5 89,012 26.1 113,715 26.2 117,653 25.7 116,830 Inner 8.9 79,391 8.9 85,216 9.7 86,612 7.9 78,399 7.9 80,319 Mongolia Guangdo 6.9 43,808 7.0 51,035 7.3 46,365 7.4 55,116 7.6 62,232 ng Shanghai 2.0 31,639 2.0 31,855 1.9 30,961 1.9 32,733 2.0 38,427 Heilongji 4.9 49,124 5.1 46,524 5.3 47,078 4.2 41,164 4.8 37,648 ang Tianjin 3.5 25,719 36.4 28,870 3.4 29,774 3.6 33,131 3.8 35,701 Ningxia 2.7 9,242 2.7 17,174 2.3 23,194 2.3 22,831 2.2 33,016 Qinghai 1.1 4,912 1.1 4,894 0.9 4,680 0.9 4,835 0.8 4,428 Tibet 0.1 931 0.1 987 N/A 1,140 N/A 1,420 0.1 1,228 Total 1,087 11,986,0 1,07 12,895,0 1,074 13,538,1 1,074 14,262,9 1,063 15,057,0 .1 83 13 05 .5 42 .3 79 .1 84 Source: China Agricultural Statistical Report Table 3: Grape Production (1000 Ha and MT) by Province 2006-2010 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Province 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT 1000 MT ha ha ha ha ha Xinjiang 103. 1,502,03 109. 1,654,58 108. 1,648,71 114. 1,932,15 125. 1,965,69 9 5 6 1 8 8 7 7 3 5 Hebei 58.1 878,417 57.9 946,886 61.0 988,071 63.4 1,050,80 70.4 1,075,46 2 8 Shandong 42.3 845,487 44.2 917,312 36.7 904,759 37.9 935,686 35.9 957,825 Liaoning 26.8 587,191 25.2 493,775 26.6 614,422 26.8 642,124 26.6 634,296 Henan 25.0 405,125 26.2 419,473 26.8 437,329 29.6 461,083 29.9 484,130 Zhejiang 10.4 238,389 12.1 269,051 14.6 332,472 17.0 390,359 20.0 425,866 Jiangsu 13.0 208,275 12.7 202,401 14.9 242,747 18.1 278,506 21.7 331,877 Shaanxi 14.7 168,353 15.1 185,261 17.7 216,562 23.9 258,829 28.8 322,292 Anhui 5.8 174,710 5.2 178,298 6.2 182,011 6.8 214,046 9.4 261,114 Guangxi 11.5 137,047 11.1 158,873 11.6 170,750 12.9 180,790 17.2 232,009 Shanxi 10.2 91,699 9.8 10.1 116,618 10.3 129,413 9.6 219,513 Sichuan 12.9 170,534 13.4 180,134 14.8 201,673 16.2 206,370 18.2 216,500 Yunnan 6.3 90,117 7.0 93,800 7.9 128,449 9.6 167,090 12.3 205,992 Jilin 11.0 110,948 11.1 138,885 12.4 131,940 11.2 144,685 11.8 152,573 Ningxia 8.8 64,796 10.2 70,576 14.0 97,033 20.2 115,827 28.7 137,640 Hubei 5.2 73,670 5.7 86,313 5.9 98,467 6.2 123,644 5.6 131,213 Gansu 8.9 90,443 10.2 105,950 11.0 99,601 13.4 116,185 18.4 128,370 Tianjin 5.2 104,103 5.4 109,545 5.1 99,959 5.2 104,560 5.3 103,322 Hunan 13.0 59,502 18.9 73,180 14.5 73,365 15.2 83,892 16.7 100,776 Fujian 5.5 85,010 5.2 86,808 5.5 95,912 5.6 98,817 5.8 100,171 Shanghai 2.1 33,895 2.7 45,682 3.8 62,508 4.2 77,123 4.4 90,814 Heilongjian 1.6 22,728 1.8 21,847 2.7 45,062 2.5 42,206 3.0 56,732 g Inner 4.5 35,386 4.8 40,989 4.8 40,644 6.0 46,983 7.6 53,148 Mongolia Guizhou 4.5 22,516 5.9 32,793 6.5 36,182 7.6 41,734 9.5 46,714 Chongqing 2.6 18,919 2.7 22,666 2.5 24,711 3.9 31,124 4.7 43,261 Beijing 3.0 47,377 2.7 47,486 3.0 45,112 2.7 40,618 2.7 42,140 Jiangxi 1.9 3,856 12.7 9,614 1.9 16,012 2.4 24,564 2.5 29,001 Tibet 0.0 114 0.1 250 N/A 289 N/A 1,286 12.3 377 Qinghai 0.0 114 N/A 112 N/A 106 N/A 109 0.1 117 National 418. 6,270,75 438. 6,696,81 451. 7,151,48 493. 7,940,61 552. 8,548,94 Total 7 6 4 4 2 4 4 2 0 6 Source: China Agriculture Statistical Report Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Apples, Fresh 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 China Market Year Begin: Jul Market Year Begin: Jul Market Year Begin: Jul 2009 2010 2011 USDA USDA USDA Of New Post ew Post ficial Of Nficial Of New Post ficial Area Planted 2,049,100 2,049,100 2,100,000 2,140,000 2,200,000 Area Harvested 0 0 0 0 0 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 31,680,788 31,680,788 33,000,000 33,263,000 35,000,000 Non-Comm. Production 0 0 0 0 0 Production 31,680,788 31,680,788 33,000,000 33,263,000 35,000,000 Imports 61,315 61,315 65,000 73,959 80,000 Total Supply 31,742,103 31,742,103 33,065,000 33,336,959 35,080,000 Fresh Dom. Consumption 24,940,850 24,940,850 27,185,000 26,520,291 28,980,000 Exports 1,201,253 1,201,253 1,080,000 1,056,668 1,100,000 For Processing 5,600,000 5,600,000 4,800,000 5,760,000 5,000,000 Total Distribution 31,742,103 31,742,103 33,065,000 33,336,959 35,080,000 Pears, Fresh 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 China Market Year Begin: Jul Market Year Begin: Jul Market Year Begin: Jul 2009 2010 2011 USDA USDA Of New Post ficial Of New USDA Post New Post ficial Official Area Planted 1,074,300 1,074,300 1,074,000 1,063,000 1,052,000 Area Harvested 0 0 0 0 0 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 14,262,979 14,262,979 15,000,000 15,057,000 15,600,000 Non-Comm. Production 0 0 0 0 0 Production 14,262,979 14,262,979 15,000,000 15,057,000 15,600,000 Imports 13 13 10 342 500 Total Supply 14,262,992 14,262,992 15,000,010 15,057,342 15,600,500 Fresh Dom. Consumption 12,690,907 12,690,907 13,450,010 13,514,466 14,000,500 Exports 469,985 469,985 430,000 422,876 400,000 For Processing 1,102,100 1,102,100 1,120,000 1,120,000 1,200,000 Total Distribution 14,262,992 14,262,992 15,000,010 15,057,342 15,600,500 Grapes, Fresh 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 China Market Year Begin: Jun Market Year Begin: Jun Market Year Begin: Jun 2009 2010 2011 USDA Of New USDA Post N USDA ew Post New Post ficial Official Official Area Planted 493,400 493,400 532,800 552,000 600,000 Area Harvested 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 5,674,612 5,674,612 6,200,000 6,200,000 6,700,000 Non-Comm. Production 0 0 0 0 0 Production 5,674,612 5,674,612 6,200,000 6,200,000 6,700,000 Imports 78,169 78,169 75,000 118,421 150,000 Total Supply 5,752,781 5,752,781 6,275,000 6,318,421 6,850,000 Fresh Dom. Consumption 5,650,740 5,650,740 6,186,000 6,230,130 6,735,000 Exports 102,041 102,041 89,000 88,291 115,000 For Processing 0 0 0 0 0 Withdrawal From Market 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 5,752,781 5,752,781 6,275,000 6,318,421 6,850,000
Posted: 25 December 2011

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