Livestock and Products Annual

An Expert's View about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in China

Posted on: 18 Oct 2011

FAS Beijing (Post) forecasts China’s 2012 total meat production will rise three percent to 81.4 million metric tons (MMT), following an estimated one percent decline in the previous year. Beef, pork, sheep and goat, and poultry meat shares are estimated to account for nearly seven percent, 63 percent, six percent, and 23 percent respectively.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 9/2/2011 GAIN Report Number: CH11042 China - Peoples Republic of Livestock and Products Annual 2011 Approved By: Scott Sindelar Prepared By: Michael Woolsey, and Jianping Zhang Report Highlights: FAS Beijing forecasts China?s beef production in 2012 will continue to decline to nearly 5.52 million metric tons (MMT), down one percent from the year before. Meanwhile, pork production in 2012 will rise four percent to 51.3 MMT following a three percent decline in 2011. High prices and resumption in subsidies this summer are encouraging herd expansion and this will boost output beginning early 2012. Lower domestic beef production will encourage higher beef imports, with sales forecast to rise seven percent to 45,000 MT in 2012. Pork imports are forecast to rise eight percent to 480,000 MT fueled by continued strong Chinese pork demand. Meanwhile, China?s live hog imports will continue rising, reaching 12,000 head in 2012, up 20 percent from estimated 10,000 sales in 2011. China?s live cattle imports in 2012, almost all breeding dairy cows, are expected to recover four percent to 75,000 head due to rising demand from the dairy sector. Chart 1: FAS Beijing's Forecast for China's Total Meat Production in 2012 (1,000 MT) 1,590 , 2% 5,520 , 7% Beef 18,670 , 23% Pork 51,280 , 63% Mutton Exe ve Total poultry Meatcuti Summary: 4,380 , 5% FAS Beijing (Post) forecasts China?s 2012 total meat production will rise three percent to Other Meat 81.4 million metric tons (MMT), following an estimated one percent decline in the previous year. Beef, pork, sheep and goat, and poultry meat shares are estimated to account for nearly seven percent, 63 percent, six percent, and 23 percent respectively. Beef production in 2012 is forecast to continue downward to 5.5 MMT as comparatively poor farm returns for raising beef cattle dampen incentive to expand herd size. Lower domestic production will raise imports seven percent to 45,000 metric tons, carcass weight equivalent (CWE). Beef exports in 2012 are forecast to increase four percent to 57,000 MT (CWE), fueled by higher demand in China?s traditional export markets in Asia. Live cattle imports in 2012, almost all breeding dairy cows, are forecast at 75,000 head, a four percent recovery from an estimated 15 percent decline in 2011. The lower than expected imports in 2011 are due to short cow supplies from Australia, the largest supplier to China?s imports, and considerably higher international cattle prices. Pork production in 2012 is forecast to jump four percent to 51.3 MMT from an estimated three percent decline in the previous year. Fueled by sharply higher prices in 2011, China?s pork producers are steadily expanding herd size and this will help boost pork output beginning early 2012. Production growth is also being supported by China?s decision in July 2011 to resume a 100 yuan ($15.60) per sow subsidy and introduce other policies to encourage herd expansion. Despite the expected recovery in pork production, China?s pork imports will continue to rise due to strong pork demand and competitive pricing on imports. Overall, pork imports in 2012 are expected to increase eight percent to 480,000 metric tons (CWE), while pork offal imports in 2012 are expected to increase 10 percent to over 700,000 MT, product weight (PW). Pork exports in 2012 are forecast to rise five percent to 272,000 MT (CWE) due to strong demand in China?s traditional Asian export markets. China?s live swine imports in 2012 are forecast at 12,000 head, up 20 percent from estimated imports in 2011. Imports in 2011 are forecast to nearly double to 10,000 head. Nearly all these imports are breeding swine. Sales are rising due to a strong need for improved genetics, high pork market prices, and China?s aforementioned decision this summer to restore sow subsidies. Cattle and Beef Cattle and beef production to continue downward in 2012 Post forecasts China?s beef cow beginning stocks in 2012 will fall nearly one percent to 46.2 million head from an estimated 46.5 million head in 2011. Dairy cow beginning stocks are forecast to increase three percent to nearly 12.8 million head boosted by China?s continued dairy herd rebuilding following herd loss in the wake of the 2008 nationwide melamine scandal. However, calf crop production in 2012 is expected to decline nearly one percent to 40.6 million head from an estimated 40.9 million head in 2011, reducing China?s 2012 beef production to 5.5 MMT from an estimated 5.6 MMT in the previous year. The continued slide in Chinese beef production is due primarily to comparatively low returns for raising cattle compared to swine and poultry. The longer production time for beef cattle, combined with continued high corn and other feed prices (corn price is up 17 percent over last year) are significant disincentives for small producers who account for the vast majority of China?s cattle operations (see table 1). Chinese producers are also challenged by limited local availability and rising prices for silage. China imported 99,700 MT of alfalfa in January-June 2011 with an average price over $300 per ton, up 14 percent from the period in 2010. Silage is often made of only corn stalks after corn is harvested. Unstable nutrition in feed makes the cattle fattening period longer than normal, which further reduces incentive to increase herd size. Finally, high labor costs because of short labor supplies, and rising costs for energy, transportation, and water are also limiting beef output growth potential. Table 1. Number of Chinese Beef Cattle Farms at Different Herd Sizes, 2007-2009 2,007 2,008 2,009 % Change 2009/08 Annual slaughter (Head) Farms Farms Farms Farms 1-9 15,351,990 13,740,379 13,278,414 -3.36 10-49 439,154 441,189 467,596 5.99 50-99 62,029 70,440 71,900 2.07 100-499 12,718 15,255 18,281 19.84 500-999 1,470 1,896 2,679 41.30 1,000 and above 486 614 749 21.99 Source: The Ministry of Agriculture Unlike many swine and poultry farms that are owned by processing plants, backyard and small cattle operators do not have their own channel to deliver cattle to slaughterhouses. They point to the predominant cattle marketing pattern, where intermediaries do the bulk of the purchasing from backyard farmers and keep farm returns low, as another significant factor in low enthusiasm for raising cattle. This predominance of this pattern is expected to stay roughly unchanged for the foreseeable future. Finally, tightening farm credit is another bottleneck hampering cattle production. On June 20, 2011, China raised its domestic bank saving reserve ratio to 21.5 percent due to inflation. Tighter credit availability makes local banks less willing to provide loans to uncertain long-term livestock projects such as raising beef cattle. Chart 2: China's Average Retail Beef Prices 2008-2011 (Year-to-Date, $1=RMB6.39) RMB/KG Unlik3e m8any .sw0ine0 and poultry farms that are owned by processing plants, backyard and small cattle operators do not have their own channel to deliver cattle to slaughterhouses. They point to the predo3min7ant .ca0ttle 0marketing pattern, where intermediaries do the bulk of the purchasing from backyard farmers and keep farm returns low, as another significant factor in low enthusiasm for raising cattle. This p3red6omi.na0nce0 of this pattern is expected to stay roughly unchanged for the foreseeable future. F 35.00inally, tightening farm credit is another bottleneck hampering cattle production. On June 20, 2011, China raised its domestic bank saving reserve ratio to 21.5 percent due to inflation. Tighter credit 34.00 availability makes local banks less willing to provide loans to uncertain long-term livestock projects such 3as ra3ising beef cattle. .00 High3 bee2f pr.ic0es w0ill constrain consumption in 2012 China3?s to1tal .be0ef c0onsumption in 2012 is forecast to decline nearly one percent to 5.5 MMT from estimated 5.6 MMT in 2011 due to smaller domestic production, making per capita consumption 30.00 roughly unchanged at 4.1 kilograms. 29.00 Despite sharply higher prices of competing meats in China this year, beef continues to be China?s priciest meat item, which limits consumption growth. In July 2011, China?s average beef price was RMB36.9 ($5.77) per kilogram, up 11 percent from July 2010. Meanwhile, pork price jumped 67 percent this year, but is still significantly cheaper at RMB29.3 ($4,58) per kilogram. Broiler price was up 24 percent to RMB2.39 ($2.7S3) poer urce: The Ministry of Ariculture kilogram from July 2010. In addition to a comparatively high price, strong demand for fresh meat in China also limits beef demand growth. Unlike pork, which is mainly produced in grain production areas near large cities, 25 percent of beef is produced in grassland areas in West China, frozen and shipped to major markets. High distribution costs and an unreliable cold chain are additional constraints. With the exception of western regions, where mutton and beef account for a large share of total meat consumption, beef is mainly consumed in wealthier urban areas. This demand is fueled by an expanding middle class in these markets. China?s urbanization will continue to be a key driver in future beef consumption growth. Beef imports in 2012 are forecast to increase seven percent Lower 2012 domestic production will encourage higher imports. China?s direct beef imports in 2012 are forecast to increase seven percent to 45,000 MT from an estimated 42,000 MT (CWE) in 2011. Shipments from Canada will account for a significant portion of this growth following China?s decision this year to lift its ban on Canadian boneless beef from cattle under 30 months old. Once these shipments begin, this will be the first entry for North American beef since China?s decisions in 2003 to ban imports from Canada and the United States following detections of BSE. Negotiations toward a market opening for US beef are expected to resume later this year. 0 1 /2 0 0 8 0 3 /2 0 0 8 0 5 /2 0 0 8 0 7 /2 0 0 8 0 9 /2 0 0 8 1 1 /2 0 0 8 0 1 /2 0 0 9 0 3 /2 0 0 9 0 5 /2 0 0 9 0 7 /2 0 0 9 0 9 /2 0 0 9 1 1 /2 0 0 9 0 1 /2 0 1 0 0 3 /2 0 1 0 0 5 /2 0 1 0 0 7 /2 0 1 0 0 9 /2 0 1 0 1 1 /2 0 1 0 0 1 /2 0 1 1 0 3 /2 0 1 1 0 5 /2 0 1 1 0 7 /2 0 1 1 Live cattle imports in 2011 far below expected, but forecast to rise four percent in 2012 Imports in 2012 are forecast at 75,000 head, a four percent recovery from an estimated 15 percent decline in the previous year. Dairy cows will continue to account for nearly all sales. In 2011, imports are well below expectations. Short cow supplies from Australia (China?s largest cow supplier) and considerably higher international cattle prices have constrained sales this year. However, the long-term prospects for cattle imports are bright as China continues to rebuild its dairy herd following the losses suffered due to weak demand in the wake of the nationwide melamine scandal in 2008. China only allows imports from Australia, New Zealand, and Uruguay. Live cattle exports down, while beef exports up in 2012 Smaller domestic cattle production will discourage live cattle exports. Overall, China?s live cattle exports in 2012 are forecast to decline three percent to 29,000 head from an estimated 30,000 head in the previous year. The exports are limited to nearby Hong Kong and Macau for fresh beef consumption. Higher fresh beef exports to these markets will partly substitute for the decline in live cattle sales. China?s beef exports in 2012 are expected to rise over five percent to 58,000 MT (CWE) from estimated 55,000 MT (CWE) in the previous year fueled by strong demand in China?s traditional export markets. The export unit price in January-June 2011 climbed 12 percent to $5,025.7 per ton, hitting at least a 10- year record high. Higher sales to China?s traditional export markets, Hong Kong, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, and the Middle East will account for all of the gains. Hong Kong will continue to serve as China?s top beef export market where Chinese beef is price competitive. Part of exports to Hong Kong has already shift from frozen beef to fresh and chilled beef as Hong Kong lifted its ban on China?s fresh and chilled beef in December 2010. AQSIQ clarifies requirements for trans-shipments of meat to third countries through China If traders wish to ship meat products through China to third countries, the exporter?s handler in mainland China will need to get a trans-shipment permit from a local CIQ office (China Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau under AQSIQ). The following are the permit requirements according to AQSIQ/Import and Export Food Safety Bureau: 1. Entry permit from the importing country 2. Copy of contract between the importer and exporter 3. Copy of the FSIS export health certificate 4. Declaration of transportation route in China Upon arrival, CIQ will check whether the information on the FSIS export health certificate, shipping documents, and container information are in compliance. CIQ officials will also check whether container seals are broken. If necessary, CIQ officials may escort the transshipments. Chart 3: China's Average Pork, Hog, and Piglet Prices 2008-2011 (Year-to-Date, $1=RMB6.39) Pork Hogs Piglets RMB/KG 40.00 35.00 Of w tra 30.00ficially, AQSIQ does not allo ns-shipments of meat prohibited in mainland China to third countries, including beef banned due to BSE, as well as poultry meat from states banned due to AI (Arkansas, PA, Texas, Virginia). 25.00 Swine and Pork 20.00 2012 pork production forecast to rise four percent Fueled by sharply higher prices in 2011, China?s pork prod1ucer5s ar.e0 stea0dily expanding herd size and this will help boost pork output beginning early 2012. Production growth is also being supported by China?s decision in July 2011 to resume a 100 yuan ($15.60) per sow subsidy and introduce other policies to encourage herd expansion. Overall, production 1is ex0pected to reach 51.3 million tons, up .00 four percent from 2011. In 2011, Post estimates China?s pork 5.00 supplies will fall three percent. Reduced supply this year is due primarily to low prices through the first half of 2010, which encouraged many smaller producers to exit hog farming, followed by unusually severe and persistent outbreaks of animal disease, such as foot and mouth disease (FMD), swine blue ear disease (PRRS), and pig epidemic diarrhea among piglets in late 2010 and early 2011. Source: The Ministry of Agriculture Lower hog supplies coupled with continued strong pork demand have created sharply higher hog prices this year, reaching 18.75 yuan ($2.93) per kilogram in July, up 68 percent compared to July 2010. The expectation that prices will continue at a high level has encouraged herd expansion in 2011. With strong demand for piglets and tight supplies, piglet price has soared to over 34 yuan ($5.40) per kilogram in July, more than double the level in July 2010. Surging pork prices in China this year (see Chart 3) became a top policy concern in 2011 as pork is a staple in China?s diet and affordable pork is considered important for social stability. In response, the leadership provided additional incentives this summer to expand herd size and reduce pork prices for China?s consumers, by improving hog farm returns. In July 2011, policymakers resumed productive sow subsidies providing 100 yuan ($15.6) per animal. The total annual value of this support is estimated at RMB2.5 billion ($391 million). Sow subsidies were initially introduced in 2007 to rebuild herd size following a severe outbreak of blue ear disease. These were suspended in mid-2010 due to oversupply. Other measures introduced this summer include higher producer supports in case of disease, such as raising payments for each culled animal (from 600 yuan ($94) to 800 yuan ($125) and each dead hog presented at slaughter (from 500 yuan ($78.1) to 800 yuan ($125) per animal. 0 1 /2 0 0 8 0 3 /2 0 0 8 0 5 /2 0 0 8 0 7 /2 0 0 8 0 9 /2 0 0 8 1 1 /2 0 0 8 0 1 /2 0 0 9 0 3 /2 0 0 9 0 5 /2 0 0 9 0 7 /2 0 0 9 0 9 /2 0 0 9 1 1 /2 0 0 9 0 1 /2 0 1 0 0 3 /2 0 1 0 0 5 /2 0 1 0 0 7 /2 0 1 0 0 9 /2 0 1 0 1 1 /2 0 1 0 0 1 /2 0 1 1 0 3 /2 0 1 1 0 5 /2 0 1 1 0 7 /2 0 1 1 While production will expand next year, it is possible total hog inventories may not reach early 2010 levels until beyond 2012. Enthusiasm for raising pigs among small backyard operators (which account for the great majority of hog farms and output) is being dampened by high costs of feed, with corn prices in China this summer topping RMB 2,330 ($364), up 17 percent from the same month last year. Threats of animal disease are another concern, fueled by persistent doubts among small producers about the effectiveness of animal drugs for FMD and PRRS provided free by the government. Small producers also fear another cycle of oversupply and low prices in the future. Finally, continuing wage hikes for migrant workers in China?s medium and large-sCizedh citieis mnake ahog farmRinge lesst attractivie bly Por k Pr i ce Change 2011, Year - to- Dat e comparison for many small farmers. Meanwhile, large scale operators report that difficulties in acquiring additional farm land are hampering their expansion plans. Combined these factors will limit produc ( RMB/ KG, $1=RMB6. 39) )tion gains and support higher than normal prices in 2012. Table 2: Number of Chinese Swine Farms at Different Herd Sizes, 2007-2009 2,007 2,008 2,009 % Change 2009/08 2011 Change 2011/ 10 Annual slaughter (Head) Farms Farms Farms Farms 1-49 80,140,750 69,960,452 64,599,143 -7.66 50-99 1,577,645 1,623,484 1,653,865 1.87 100-499 542,014 633,971 689,739 8.80 24. 50 60. 00% 500-999 83,731 108,676 129,369 19.04 1,000-2,999 30,053 40,010 46,429 16.04 48. 97% 3,000-4,999 6,146 8,744 10,342 18.28 5,000-29,9949 . 00 2,840 4,172 5,117 22.65 44. 29% 50. 00% 10,000-49,000 1,803 2,432 3,083 26.77 50,000 and above 50 69 96 39.13 Source2: Th3e Ministry of Agriculture . 50 China resumes subsid 33 40. 00%. 31%ies for large scale hog farms 23. 00 In continuation of China?s policy to encourage more scale, standardization, modernization, and integration in Chinese hog farming, the central government has reportedly resumed payments for large- 30. 00% sized operations, under a scheme entitled the ?large-scale standardized swine farm subsidy?. While subsidy amounts have not yet been announced, the minimum farm size to be eligible for the2 pay3me.nt i0s 3%22. 50 at least an annual slaughter of 5,000 head. This is up from 500 head for a similar subsidy that was 14. 81% introduced in 2009, entitled the ?standardized swine raising farm subsidy?. Payments were suspended 20. 00% in 2010 due to hog oversupply. In 2009, farms with 5,000 head or more were eligible for a one-time payme2nt o2f RM.B8000,000 ($126,000). Farms that received the payment in 2009 will not be eligible in 2011. In addition to minimum herd size, farms must meet certain conditions to be eligible, including a requirement that they are either new or improved. 10. 00% 21. 50 22. 1Tot7al and 22. 97 23. 09 23. 39 23. 97 per capita pork consumption in 2012 on the rise 21. 00 0. 00% With the expected increase in domestic pork production and higher pork imports, China?s Jan Feb Mar Apr May Sour ce: The Mi ni st r y of Agr i cul t ur e total pork consumption in 2012 is forecast to increase nearly four percent to 51.5 MMT from estimated 49.7 MMT in the previous year. Per capita consumption will reach 38 kilograms, up from 37 kilograms in 2011. China?s 2011 pork consumption is forecast three percent downward, due to sharply higher domestic pork prices caused by a smaller slaughter, which will drive part of Chinese consumption to switch to cheaper poultry meat or red variety meats in 2011. Swine and pork imports forecast higher in 2012 With only moderate growth in domestic pork production and high domestic pork prices, China?s pork imports will continue higher through 2012. Pork imports in 2012 are forecast to increase eight percent to 480,000 MT. Pork offal imports in 2012 are forecast to increase 15 percent to over 700,000 MT. A significant change in China?s imports in 2011 is that direct shipments are on the rise, while Hong Kong re-exports to China are decreasing. For direct shipments alone, China?s market size for imported pork in 2011 is about $351 million with U.S. exports accounting for 42 percent of the total market. Imports of pork offal in 2011 could exceed $1.2 billion. The United States currently accounts for 58 percent of China?s total pork offal imports. Offal will continue to dominate China?s total pork product imports for the foreseeable future. China?s live swine imports in 2012 are forecast at 12,000 head, a 20 percent increase from estimated imports in 2011. Imports in 2011 are forecast to nearly double to 10,000 head. Nearly all these imports are breeding swine. Sales are rising due to a strong need for improved genetics, high pork market prices, and China?s aforementioned decision in July 2011 to resume sow subsidies of 100 yuan ($1.56) for each productive sow. China lifted its H1N1 ban on U.S. live swine in April 2011 and U.S. sales are gradually picking up as U.S. exporters resume outreach to Chinese buyers. However, Chinese buyers report a shift in preference to swine from the EU and U.S. exporters will need to expand marketing efforts to restore U.S. dominance of the Chinese live swine import market prior to the 2009 H1N1 ban. In the first half of 2011, the United Kingdom and France accounted for 80 percent of China?s total swine imports. Pork exports in 2012 are forecast to rise eight percent, while live swine exports should remain flat With domestic pork production climbing, China?s pork exports in 2012 are forecast at 280,000 MT (CWE), an eight percent increase from estimated 260,000 MT (CWE) in the previous year, fueled by strong demand in China?s traditional export markets in Asia. Most gains will come from Malaysia and the Philippines, where Chinese export prices are competitive. Exports in 2011 are forecast lower than the previous estimate due to smaller domestic slaughter and pork production impacted by animal diseases. China?s live swine exports to Hong Kong and Macau for local fresh meat consumption in 2012 are forecast to be roughly unchanged at 1.65 million head. These two destinations account for all of China?s live hog exports and export growth continues to be dampened by limited slaughter capacity and flat demand in these markets. Statistic Tables Cattle PS&D Table Animal Numbers, Cattle China 2010 2011 2012 Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: 2010 2011 Jan 2012 USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Total Cattle Beg. Stks 105,430 105,430 104,814 104,814 103,921 (1000 HEAD) Dairy Cows Beg. Stocks 12,603 12,603 12,960 12,600 12,800 (1000 HEAD) Beef Cows Beg. Stocks 47,000 47,000 46,480 46,480 46,200 (1000 HEAD) Production (Calf Crop) 41,500 41,500 40,900 40,900 40,600 (1000 HEAD) Intra-EU Imports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Other Imports 85 85 100 72 75 (1000 HEAD) Total Imports 85 85 100 72 75 (1000 HEAD) Total Supply 147,015 147,015 145,814 145,786 144,596 (1000 HEAD) Intra EU Exports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Other Exports 36 36 30 30 29 (1000 HEAD) Total Exports 36 36 30 30 29 (1000 HEAD) Cow Slaughter 41,170 41,170 40,440 40,850 40,556 (1000 HEAD) Calf Slaughter 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Other Slaughter 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Total Slaughter 41,170 41,170 40,440 40,850 40,556 (1000 HEAD) Loss 995 995 985 985 800 (1000 HEAD) Ending Inventories 104,814 104,814 104,359 103,921 103,211 (1000 HEAD) Total Distribution 147,015 147,015 145,814 145,786 144,596 (1000 HEAD) CY Imp. from U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) CY. Exp. to U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Balance 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Inventory Balance -616 -616 -455 -893 -710 (1000 HEAD) Inventory Change 0 0 -1 -1 -1 (PERCENT) Cow Change -1 -1 0 0 0 (PERCENT) Production Change -3 -3 -1 -1 -1 (PERCENT) Production to Cows 70 70 69 69 69 (PERCENT) Trade Balance -49 -49 -70 -42 -46 (1000 HEAD) Slaughter to Inventory 39 39 39 39 39 (PERCENT) TS=TD 0 0 0 (Data included in this report is not official USDA data. Official USDA data is available at http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonlineonline) Beef PS&D Table Meat, Beef and Veal China 2010 2011 2012 Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begin arket Year Begin: Jan : Jan 2011 M 2012 USDA USDA Of New USDA Post New Post Offici New Post ficial Official al Slaughter (Reference) 41,170 41,170 40,440 40,850 40,557 (1000 HEAD) Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Production 5,600 5,600 5,500 5,550 5,520 (1000 MT CWE) Intra-EU Imports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Other Imports 40 40 55 42 45 (1000 MT CWE) Total Imports 40 40 55 42 45 (1000 MT CWE) Total Supply 5,640 5,640 5,555 5,592 5,565 (1000 MT CWE) Intra EU Exports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Other Exports 51 51 60 55 58 (1000 MT CWE) Total Exports 51 51 60 55 58 (1000 MT CWE) Human Dom. 5,589 5,589 5,495 5,537 5,507 (1000 MT Consumption CWE) Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Total Dom. Consumption 5,589 5,589 5,495 5,537 5,507 (1000 MT CWE) Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Total Distribution 5,640 5,640 5,555 5,592 5,565 (1000 MT CWE) CY Imp. from U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) CY. Exp. to U.S. 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Balance 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Inventory Balance 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Weights 136 136 136 136 136 (1000 MT CWE) Production Change -3 -3 -2 -1 -1 (PERCENT) Import Change 74 74 38 5 7 (PERCENT) Export Change 34 34 18 8 5 (PERCENT) Trade Balance 11 11 5 13 13 (1000 MT CWE) Consumption Change -3 -3 -2 -1 -1 (PERCENT) Population 1,347,563,49 1,341,550,00 1,356,818,73 1,348,391,90 1,355,133,86 (PEOPLE) 8 0 7 5 5 Per Capita Consumption 4 4.20 4 4.10 4.10 (KG) TS=TD 0 0 0 (Data included in this report is not official USDA data. Official USDA data is available at http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonlineonline) Swine PS&D Table Animal Numbers, Swine China 2010 2011 2012 Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: 2010 2011 Jan 2012 USDA Of New USDA Post New Pos USDA t ficial Official Of New Pos t ficial Total Beginning Stocks 469,960 469,960 477,200 477,115 459,150 (1000 HEAD) Sow Beginning Stocks 49,100 49,100 48,500 47,500 47,300 (1000 HEAD) Production (Pig Crop) 677,800 677,800 689,000 641,250 657,470 (1000 HEAD) Intra-EU Imports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Other Imports 6 6 10 10 12 (1000 HEAD) Total Imports 6 6 10 10 12 (1000 HEAD) Total Supply 1,147,766 1,147,766 1,166,210 1,118,375 1,116,632 (1000 HEAD) Intra EU Exports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Other Exports 1,636 1,721 1,595 1,650 1,650 (1000 HEAD) Total Exports 1,636 1,721 1,595 1,650 1,650 (1000 HEAD) Sow Slaughter 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Other Slaughter 667,000 667,000 686,275 656,575 676,312 (1000 HEAD) Total Slaughter 667,000 667,000 686,275 656,575 676,312 (1000 HEAD) Loss 1,930 1,930 881 1,000 800 (1000 HEAD) Ending Inventories 477,200 477,115 477,459 459,150 437,870 (1000 HEAD) Total Distribution 1,147,766 1,147,766 1,166,210 1,118,375 1,116,632 (1000 HEAD) CY Imp. from U.S. 3 3 3 3 7 (1000 HEAD) CY. Exp. to U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Balance 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 HEAD) Inventory Balance 7240 7155 259 -17965 -21280 (1000 HEAD) Inventory Change 2 2 2 2 -4 (PERCENT) Sow Change 1 1 -1 -3 0 (PERCENT) Production Change 3 3 2 -5 3 (PERCENT) Production to Sows 14 13.8 14 13.5 13.9 (PERCENT) Trade Balance 1630 1715 1585 1640 1638 (1000 HEAD) Slaughter to Inventory 142 142 144 138 147 (PERCENT) TS=TD 0 0 0 (Data included in this report is not official USDA data. Official USDA data is available at http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonlineonline) Pork PS&D Table Meat, Swine China 2010 2011 2012 Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begi Market Year Begin: Jan n : Jan 2011 2012 USDA USDA Of New Post ew DA Pos USt ficial Of Nficial Of New Post ficial Slaughter (Reference) 667,000 667,000 686,275 652,587 656,57 676,312 (1000 8 HEAD) Beginning Stocks 120 120 170 170 200 (1000 MT CWE) Production 51,070 51,070 52,500 49,500 51,280 (1000 MT CWE) Intra-EU Imports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Other Imports 355 415 410 445 480 (1000 MT CWE) Total Imports 355 415 410 445 480 (1000 MT CWE) Total Supply 51,545 51,605 53,080 50,115 51,960 (1000 MT CWE) Intra EU Exports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Other Exports 278 278 330 260 280 (1000 MT CWE) Total Exports 278 278 330 260 280 (1000 MT CWE) Human Dom. 51,097 51,165 52,580 49,655 51,510 (1000 MT Consumption CWE) Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Total Dom. Consumption 51,097 51,157 52,580 49,655 51,510 (1000 MT CWE) Ending Stocks 170 170 170 200 170 (1000 MT CWE) Total Distribution 51,545 51,605 53,080 50,115 51,960 (1000 MT CWE) CY Imp. from U.S. 565 565 0 179 180 (1000 MT CWE) CY. Exp. to U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Balance 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT CWE) Inventory Balance 50 50 0 30 -30 (1000 MT CWE) Weights 77 77 76 76 76 (1000 MT CWE) Production Change 4 4 3 -3 4 (PERCENT) Import Change 31 31 15 7 8 (PERCENT) Export Change 20 20 19 -6 8 (PERCENT) Trade Balance -77 -137 -80 -185 -200 (1000 MT CWE) Consumption Change 5 5 3 -3 4 (PERCENT) Population 1,347,563,4 1,347,563,4 1,356,818,7 1,347,563,4 1,347,563,4 (PEOPLE) 98 98 37 98 98 Per Capita Consumption 38 38 39 37 38 (KG) TS=TD 0 0 0 (Data included in this report is not official USDA data. Official USDA data is available at http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonlineonline) Cattle and Beef Trade Matrices China Live Cattle Imports by Reporting Countries Export Statistics 2009-2011 (Year-To-Date; Number of Head) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Origin 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 47,081 82,810 32,396 30,635 -5.44 Australia 32,789 57,418 21765 19,256 -11.53 New Zealand 10,028 16,998 6,683 6,579 -1.56 Uruguay 4,131 8,248 3,948 4,800 21.58 Other 133 146 0 0 0.00 HS Codes: 010210, and 010290 Source: Global Trade Atlas Note: As of 2009, China changed its live cattle imports and exports from number of head to metric tons. This table uses reporting countries' export statistics in number of head. Uruguayan exports to China are estimated due to incomplete data. China Direct Beef and Veal Imports, 2009-2011 (Year-To-Date; Metric Tons) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Origin 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 14,275 23,756 5,739 6,565 14.39 Uruguay 5,163 7,633 2,775 3,031 9.23 Australia 5,558 5,757 1,480 2,385 61.15 New Zealand 2,505 2,442 1,155 795 -31.17 Brazil 933 7,853 281 351 24.91 United States 0 0 0 0 0.00 Canada 0 0 0 0 0.00 Other 116 71 48 3 -93.75 HS Code: 020110, 020120, 020130, 020210, 020220, 020230, 021020, and 160250 Source: Global Trade Atlas Hong Kong Beef and Veal Re-Exports to China, 2009-2011 (Year-To-Date; Metric Tons) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Origin 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 2,181 4,670 555 237 -57.30 United States 139 243 91 47 -48.35 Canada 26 61 26 24 -7.69 Brazil 1,457 3,823 195 11 -94.36 Uruguay 51 190 55 0 -100.00 Australia 100 0 100 0 -100.00 New Zealand 0 31 0 0 0.00 Argentina 326 77 55 0 -100.00 Other 82 245 33 155 369.70 HS Code: 020110, 020120, 020130, 020210, 020220, 020230, 021020, and 160250 Source: Global Trade Atlas China Live Cattle Exports, 2009-2011 (Year-To-Date; Number of Head) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Destination 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 31,610 31,202 12,326 12,810 3.93 Hong Kong 28,657 27,949 11,346 11,792 3.93 Macau 2,720 2,618 980 1,018 3.88 Mongolia 229 615 0 0 0.00 Korea North 4 20 0 0 0.00 Other 0 0 0 0 0.00 HS Code: 010210, 010290 Source: Global Trade Atlas Note: As of 2009, China changed its live cattle imports and exports from number of head to metric tons. This table uses importing countries' statistics in number of head. Macau's imports are estimated due to incomplete data. China Beef and Veal Exports, 2009-2011 (Year-to-Date; Metric Tons) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Destination 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 27,183 36,186 13,010 15,774 21.25 Hong Kong 11,392 12,458 5,007 5,450 8.85 Japan 4,846 6,245 1,686 2,700 60.14 Jordan 2,019 3,491 907 1,406 55.02 Kuwait 3,192 3,579 1,543 1,491 -3.37 Israel 417 2,172 663 1,137 71.49 Kyrgyzstan 2,042 4,249 1,433 1,222 -14.72 Lebanon 191 1,112 396 427 7.83 Brunei 267 252 130 211 62.31 Malaysia 995 1,041 596 472 -20.81 Macau 223 261 94 138 46.81 Korea North 85 263 90 117 30.00 Angola 330 228 95 112 17.89 Libya 0 25 25 0 -100.00 United Arab Emirates 72 2 0 25 0.00 Korea South 196 0 0 0 0.00 Other 916 808 345 866 151.01 HS Code: 020110, 020120, 020130, 020210, 020220, 020230, 021020 and 160250 Source: Global Trade Atlas Swine and Pork Matrices China Swine Imports by Reporting Countries' Export Statistics, 2009-2011 (Year-T0-Date, Number of Head) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Origin 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 5,750 6,492 864 2,005 132.06 United Kingdom 0 0 0 1,395 0.00 Canada 0 666 0 610 0.00 United States 4,249 2,501 101 0 -100 Denmark 156 1,755 479 0 -100 France 1,345 1,117 284 0 -100 Other 0 0 0 0 0.00 HS Code: 010310, 010391, and 010392Source: Global Trade Atlas Source: Global Trade Atlas Note: As of 2009, China changed its swine trade numbers from number of head to metric tons. This table uses reporting countries' exports statistics in number of head. The numbers of EU countries are estimated due to incomplete data. China Direct Pork Imports, 2009-2011 (Year-To-Date; Metric Tons) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Origin 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 135,227 200,109 71,382 100,049 40.16 United States 22,168 29,180 0 48,603 0.00 Denmark 46,246 72,632 40,735 17,302 -57.53 Canada 28,225 38,992 14,512 14,228 -1.96 Spain 25,056 28,279 12,521 9,061 -27.63 France 12,954 11,183 3,255 6,830 109.83 Germany 5 17,792 0 2,399 0.00 Ireland 0 1,444 0 877 0.00 Other 573 607 359 749 108.64 HS Code: 020311, 020312, 020319, 020321, 020322, 020329, 021011 021012, 021019, 160241, 160242, and 160249 , Source: Global Trade Atlas Hong Kong Pork Re-Exports to China, 2009-2011 (Year-To-Date; Metric Tons) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Origin 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 72,757 118,879 44,574 37,875 -15.03 Germany 13,730 28,729 10,232 8,440 -17.51 Spain 9,285 15,774 6,324 5,119 -19.05 United States 11,474 14,312 5265 5,066 -3.78 Poland 2,351 5,801 1596 3,331 108.71 Netherlands 3,586 7,222 2551 3,286 28.81 Italy 3,096 6,958 2,869 2,385 -16.87 Brazil 5,046 3,723 1,348 1,764 30.86 France 3,078 4,201 1,263 1,372 8.63 United Kingdom 3,035 3,846 1,328 1,348 1.51 Canada 9,827 9,877 4,207 1,071 -74.54 Belgium 818 1,893 568 756 33.10 Denmark 2106 6,248 3883 727 -81.28 Hungary 459 2,512 684 588 -14.04 Portugal 124 751 143 570 298.60 Ireland 902 804 1045 305 -70.81 Sweden 165 521 191 231 20.94 Austria 274 663 22 24 9.09 Other 3,401 5,044 1,055 1,492 41.42 HS Code: 020311, 020312, 020319, 020321, 020322, 020329, 021011 021012, 021019, 160241, 160242, and 160249 , Source: Global Trade Atlas China Swine Exports, 2009-2011 (Year-To-Date; Number of Head) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Destination 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 1,693,300 1,721,292 708,113 655,163 -7.48 Hong Kong 1,601,987 1,636,001 669,674 617,147 -7.84 Macau 91,313 85,236 38,439 38,016 -1.10 Other 0 60 0 0 0.00 HS Code: 010310, 010391, 010392 Source: Global Trade Atlas Note: As of 2009, China changed its swine imports and exports from number of head to metric tons. This table uses importing countries' statistics in number of head. Macau's imports are estimated due to incomplete data. China Pork Exports, 2009-2011 (Yeat-To-Date, Metric Tons) Jan-Dec Jan-Dec Jan-May Jan-May Quantity Quantity Quantity Comparison % Change Destination 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011/10 World 178,509 213,563 78,419 80,754 2.98 Hong Kong 97,533 113,135 45,019 44,386 -1.41 Japan 40,060 43,413 14,315 16,034 12.01 Philippines 6,421 10,860 3,156 4,796 51.96 Malaysia 5,576 8,748 2,526 4,270 69.04 Macau 4,984 5,990 2,334 2,612 11.91 Singapore 7,397 6,216 2,170 2,272 4.70 Kyrgyzstan 8,734 12,391 3,657 2,168 -40.72 Albania 1,671 2,642 1,100 1,122 2.00 Indonesia 1,559 1,253 494 283 -42.71 Angola 278 194 365 188 -48.49 Lebanon 69 241 49 154 214.29 Korea South 351 142 55 110 100.00 Korea North 25 92 26 3 -88.46 Ukraine 475 2,000 1,000 0 -100.00 Vietnam 98 18 4 0 -100.00 Russia 71 0 0 0 0.00 Other 3,682 8,228 2,149 2,356 9.63 HS Code: 020311, 020312, 020319, 020321, 020322, 020329, 021011 021012, 1021019, 60241, 160242, and 160249 Source: Global Trade Atlas Monthly swine and productive sow inventory table China Monthly Swine and Productive Sow Inventories 2009-2011 (1,000 Head) 2009 Total Swine Productive Sows % Sow Ratio January 456,160 50,100 10.98 February 445,940 49,870 11.18 March 448,610 49,420 11.02 April 454,890 49,220 10.82 May 453,250 48,800 10.77 June 447,200 48,300 10.80 July 450,060 48,060 10.68 August 458,160 48,160 10.51 September 465,160 48,400 10.41 October 469,210 48,750 10.39 November 465,900 48,700 10.45 December 469,834 49,100 10.45 2010 January 455,000 48,700 10.70 February 443,300 48,900 11.03 March 441,300 48,400 10.97 April 436,000 47,600 10.92 May 433,700 47,000 10.84 June 436,700 46,800 10.72 July 440,000 46,300 10.52 August 441,800 45,800 10.37 September 454,500 47,000 10.34 October 454,400 46,900 10.32 November 454,700 46,600 10.25 December 464,400 47,500 10.23 2011 January 445,100 47,400 10.65 February 444,100 47,300 10.65 March 447,500 47,100 10.53 April 449,200 46,950 10.45 May 452,800 47,100 10.40 June 456,400 47,200 10.21 July August September October November December Source: The Ministry of Agriculture Livestock price tables China National Retail Beef Prices on Average, 2007-2011 (Year-To-Date) (RMB/KG, $1=RMB6.39) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 % Change 2011/10 January 19.64 29.11 33.90 34.08 35.72 4.81 February 20.35 31.40 33.72 34.54 36.41 5.41 March 20.14 31.42 33.13 33.86 35.78 5.67 April 20.07 31.55 32.81 33.45 35.59 6.40 May 20.28 31.73 32.60 33.24 35.63 7.19 June 21.21 31.82 32.53 33.16 36.19 9.14 July 22.02 31.92 32.46 33.30 36.91 10.84 August 23.13 32.02 32.70 33.55 September 23.69 32.39 32.96 33.89 October 24.36 32.74 33.15 34.17 November 25.27 32.98 33.35 34.65 December 26.65 33.25 33.73 35.07 Source: The Ministry of Agriculture China Retail Pork Prices On Average, 2007-2011 (Year-To-Date) (RMB/KG, $1=RMB6.39) MONTH 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 % Change 2011/10 January 14.91 25.53 21.25 19.31 22.17 14.81 February 14.97 26.08 20.62 18.67 22.97 23.03 March 14.50 25.56 19.30 17.32 23.09 33.31 April 14.39 25.68 17.60 16.21 23.39 44.29 May 15.86 24.71 15.68 16.09 23.97 48.97 June 17.74 24.10 15.46 16.04 26.71 66.52 July 20.77 23.58 16.27 17.54 29.30 67.05 August 22.95 23.18 17.94 19.30 September 22.10 22.59 18.97 20.11 October 21.15 20.86 18.71 20.42 November 22.35 19.46 18.47 21.33 December 24.05 20.34 19.11 21.94 Source: The Ministry of Agriculture China Retail Hog Prices On Average, 2007-2011 (Year-To-Date) (RMB/KG, $1=RMB6.39) MONTH 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 % Change 2011/10 January 9.55 16.50 13.41 12.05 13.88 15.19 February 9.20 16.70 12.70 11.14 14.35 28.82 March 8.91 16.83 11.63 10.06 14.78 46.92 April 9.02 16.87 10.35 9.53 15.05 57.92 May 10.20 15.77 9.24 9.62 15.53 61.43 June 11.37 15.35 9.33 9.64 17.54 81.95 July 13.12 14.82 10.13 11.14 18.75 68.31 August 14.27 14.47 11.38 12.19 September 13.60 13.86 11.85 12.55 October 13.21 12.50 11.47 12.78 November 14.13 11.90 11.40 13.55 December 15.46 12.91 12.09 13.79 Source: The Ministry of Agriculture China Retail Piglet Prices On Average, 2007-2011 (Year-To-Date) (RMB/KG, $1=RMB6.39) MONTH 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 % Change 2011/10 January 12.12 29.66 20.06 17.41 18.65 7.12 February 12.26 30.62 20.11 16.60 19.46 17.23 March 12.68 35.29 19.75 15.61 22.81 46.12 April 13.31 38.23 18.27 14.74 24.99 69.54 May 15.09 36.11 15.41 14.77 26.71 80.84 June 17.17 34.55 15.08 14.39 31.11 116.19 July 20.11 33.01 15.88 15.77 34.69 119.97 August 24.09 30.94 17.74 17.61 September 23.70 28.55 18.78 18.24 October 22.62 23.44 18.14 18.21 November 23.84 20.02 17.39 18.55 December 26.21 19.42 17.55 18.64 Source: The Ministry of Agriculture (End of the report)
Posted: 18 October 2011

See more from Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in China

Expert Views    
2012 South China Tree nut   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Strawberries (End of Year Report)   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Oilseeds and Products Update   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Poultry and Products Annual   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Hot Tips    
Crop Seeds of Cole Vegetables in China   By Foreign Agricultural Service