Dairy and Products Annual

An Expert's View about Food , Beverages and Tobacco in India

Posted on: 31 Oct 2011

Economic growth and a growing population are driving dairy demand up at a greater pace than India?s dairy producers are able to expand production.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 10/11/2011 GAIN Report Number: IN1197 India Dairy and Products Annual 2011 Approved By: Thom Wright Prepared By: Ritambhara Singh Report Highlights: Indian calendar year (CY) 2011 milk production is estimated at 121.50 million tons and is forecast to increase by 4.5 percent to a record 127 million tons in 2012, based on growing consumer demand and strong milk prices. According to India?s National Dairy Development Board, demand is growing at double the growth rate of production. To address supply concerns, the Indian Government has permitted duty-free imports of up to 50,000 tons of non-fat dry milk and 15,000 tons of butter oil during the 2011 Indian fiscal year (April 2011 to March 2012). Commodities: Dairy, Milk, Fluid Dairy, Milk, Nonfat Dry Dairy, Butter Production: Economic growth and a growing population are driving dairy demand up at a greater pace than India?s dairy producers are able to expand production. According to India?s National Dairy Development Board (NDDB), demand is growing at approximately 6 to 8 percent, nearly double the growth rate of production. Given India?s general preference for vegetarian and dairy-based protein sources, demand from India?s emerging middle class is pushing up dairy prices, leading to new interest in dairy production as a commercial activity. As a result, India?s dairy production continues to expand to record levels. India?s dairy sector is made up of millions of farmers, the vast majority of whom milk fewer than five animals. Indian dairy production is frequently described as following a ?low input, low output? model, implying that farmers typically maintain extremely low costs of production, but also maintain some of the herd yields of any country in the world. Animal feeding is heavily dependent on agricultural byproducts. Commercially prepared feed, while available, is not extensively used. (Note that while some input-intensive, high-productivity dairies are functioning in India, these dairies are not widespread throughout the country and make up a small portion of total dairy production.) In response to growing demand, Post forecasts CY2012 fluid milk production at a record 127 million tons, approximately 4.5 percent more than CY 2011 which is consistent with national estimates. This estimate may fluctuate slightly in response to fodder availability and overall monsoon conditions in 2012. CY 2011 production of milk is estimated at 121.50 million tons, around 4 percent up over CY 2010. CY 2010 fluid milk production is kept unchanged at 117 million tons reflecting strong monsoon and related good fodder availability. Production of non-fat dry milk (NFDM) is largely a function of flush season fluid milk availability and lean season demand. As that India continues to take measures to increase the quantity of milk powders available to Indian consumers, NFDM production is expected to grow in correlation with increased fluid milk output. (In 2011, India prohibited NFDM exports as well increased the quota on duty-free milk powder imports from 30,000 metric tons to 50,000 metric tons- see TRADE section). Additionally, industry reports that prevailing strong milk prices are encouraging NFDM production for later release during the lean season. Given these conditions, CY 2012 production of NFDM is forecast to increase to a record 450,000 metric tons. The CY 2011 production estimate for NFDM has been kept unchanged at 410,000 metric tons. Post has revised NFDM production estimates for CY 2010 up marginally by 5,000 metric tons to 380,000 metric tons, reflecting good fluid milk production on account of a favorable 2010 monsoon. Post forecasts 2012 production of combined butter and ghee (clarified butter) to increase by 4 percent over 2011 to 4.50 million metric tons, following India?s rising production trend. Post has revised the 2011 production estimates of butter down 5000 metric tons to 4.32 million metric tons in response to the 6000 metric ton carry over from 2010. CY 2010 production of butter has been revised marginally upwards by 7,000 metric tons to 4.16 million metric tons reflecting good milk production on account of a favorable 2010 monsoon. India: Growing milk supply deficit concerns ?Annual milk production in India has grown more than six times since independence. The average annual growth rate in the production of milk in recent years has been close to 4 percent. Even though the level of per capita availability at 263 gram/ day for India in 2009-10 is much lower than that in developed countries, it is well above the developing country average. The Eleventh Five Year Plan envisages an overall growth of 6-7 per cent per annum for the sector. As per an assessment made by the Planning Commission, the domestic demand for milk by 2021-22 is expected to be 172.20 million tons. As projected under the proposed National Dairy Plan, the production of milk in the country is required to increase to 180 million tons by 2021-22 to meet the demand. However, the country has not been able to keep pace with the domestic demand for milk.? (Source: Chapter 8: Agriculture and food Management, Economic Survey, 2010-11 Government of India, Ministry of Finance, Department of Economic Affairs.) PRODUCTION POLICY Indian dairy policy is currently focused on increasing milk output. The NDDB has created a ?National Dairy Plan,? (NDP) with the overall objective of meeting India?s growing demand for dairy products and putting India on the path to sustainability in milk production. Although the NDP is not yet finalized, it is envisaged to span over a 15-year period with an estimated outlay of more than 3 billion U.S. dollars in various phases. The plan aims to increase milk production to 180 million tons by 2020, bringing about a second White Revolution in India. (The White Revolution was the program which oversaw the creation of India?s milk marketing system and helped India to become one of the world?s largest dairy producers). The plan further envisages this transformation to occur through activities including improved artificial insemination (AI) and breeding services, improved cattle feed manufacturing, and expanding/strengthening milk processing infrastructure. The plan also proposes to enhance the share of milk from organized sector in total marketable surplus. The Government of India (GOI) is exploring World Bank assistance to bring down the cost to the government. In addition to the National Dairy Plan, the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries (DAHD), Ministry of Agriculture, implemented four schemes in the dairy sector during 11th plan period (2007-2012). These are: 1. Intensive Dairy Development Program (IDDP): This program is being implemented by the State Dairy Federations/District Milk Union and has the following six objectives: o Development of milk cattle. o Increase milk production by providing technical inputs services. o Procurement, processing and marketing of milk in a cost effective manner. o Ensure remunerative prices to milk producers. o Generate additional employment opportunities. o Improve the social, nutritional and economic status of residents of comparatively more disadvantaged areas. The GOI has approved continuance of this program for the financial year 2011-12 (April-March). Details are available at: Administrative approval for continuance of Centrally Sponsored Scheme (IDDP) 2011-12 2. Strengthening infrastructure for quality & clean milk production : This program is being implemented through the State Government by District Cooperative Milk Unions/State Level Milk Federations. The objectives of the program are: Creation of necessary infrastructure for production of quality milk at the farmer?s level up to the points of consumption. Improvement of milking procedures at the farmer level. Training and Strengthening of infrastructure to create mass awareness about importance of clean milk production 3. Assistance to Cooperatives: The program is being implemented by the concerned District Co- operative Milk Unions/State Dairy Federations. The objective of the program is to revitalize underperforming dairy co-operative unions at the district level and co-operative federations at the State level. 4. Dairy Entrepreneurship Development Scheme: This program is being implemented through the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD), starting in September 2010 and has the following objectives: o Setting up modern dairy farms for the production of clean milk. o Encouraging heifer calf rearing for conservation and development of good breeding stock. o Creating structural changes in the unorganized sector so that initial processing of milk can be taken up at the village level. o Upgrading of technology to handle milk on a commercial scale. The GOI has approved continuance of this program for the financial year 2011-12 (April-March). Details are available at: Administrative approval for continuance of Centrally Sponsored Scheme (IDDP) 2011-12 While breeding stock development continues to take place through the Ministry of Agriculture?s research programs, the GOI has also taken steps to allow the importation of high quality genetics. Currently, India allows imports of bovine semen and embryos (subject to strict quality norms). Additionally, the GOI launched the ?National Project for Cattle and Buffalo Breeding? (NPCBB) in October 2000. This program has targeted improving Indian indigenous breeds on a priority basis over a ten-year period with an allocation of USD 255 million. The project envisages genetic improvements of indigenous cattle and buffaloes, development and conservation of important indigenous breeds and the building of a sustainable breeding policy, with a focus on increasing milk production. According to DAHD, the project has many achievements, including the significant increase of in-milk animals and the number of crossbred cattle over the last decade. Following the success of NPCBB, the GOI has decided to continue this program through the 11th Five Year Plan period (2007 -2012). In India, animal feeding typically relies on agricultural byproducts rather than grain-based feeds or specialized fodder. While some use of capital-intensive feeds does occur, regular use is limited to a few producers. Additionally, only 4 percent of total cropping area in India is under forage cultivation, resulting in an acute need for improved access to succulent feed. The GOI is addressing this issue through its Accelerated Fodder Development Program (AFDP), announced in Indian Financial Year 2011-12 (April-March). The program aims to increase fodder production through intensive promotion technologies, benefiting about 25,000 villages in India. AFDP envisages creating a supply of quality seeds, promoting the production of fodder crops, extending fodder cultivation to currently fallow and unutilized lands, and promoting post-harvest technologies for fodder preservation. The GOI launched the National Mission for Protein Supplements in Indian Financial Year 2011-12 with an allocation of more than USD 65 million. This mission will take up activities to promote animal based protein production through livestock development, dairy farming, piggeries, goat rearing and fisheries in selected blocks of the country. The private sector is also playing a role by providing extension activities oriented at ensuring a stable supply of high-quality milk for procurement. Through the private sector, Indian dairy farmers are receiving artificial insemination services, veterinary care and other livestock management training. As genetic improvements become more available, it is expected that Indian producers will continue to use higher yielding foreign cattle/local breed hybrid crosses, often provided through their milk procurement company?s own extension services. For more information see India Livestock and Products Annual Report 2011; GAIN IN 1184. REGULATION OF MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS IN INDIA The new Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) is charged with regulating food safety in India. Under the mandate of the Food Safety and Standards act of 2006, the FSSAI has consolidated various food laws, including the Milk and Milk Products Regulation (MMPR) 2009, into one umbrella regulation known as the Food Safety and Standards Regulation, 2011. The Food Safety and Standards Rules and Regulation 2011 was enforced nationwide on August 5, 2011. Among various food products, the regulation also regulates the production, distribution, and supply of milk products; establishes sanitary requirements for dairies, machinery, and premises; and sets quality control standards for milk and milk products. Although minimal changes are expected to India?s existing food safety laws, the Food Safety and Standards Regulation proposed a new definition for cheeses which would prohibit the use of animal-derived rennet. These regulations apply equally to domestic and imported food. For details please refer to IN1174 on India Enforces the New Food Safety Law. The ?Food Safety and Standards Regulations? require that a food business operator (including food processors, manufacturers, exporters, or importers), shall hold a license to carry out his business in India. No person shall commence or carry out any food business except under a license issued by the FSSAI. At the same time, the operator shall register his business with the appropriate registration authority. Per the provisions of MMPR, 2009, a dairy unit handling up to 200 thousand liters per day (TLPD) of milk or 10,000 metric tons of milk solids per annum, where the entire activity of procurement, processing and marketing lies within a state or union territory, the registration authority shall be an officer of the concerned state government or union territory. Dairy units handling more than 200 TLPD of milk or 10,000 metric tons of milk solids per annum shall be registered by the Central Registering Authority. Under the new food safety law, food business operators are expected to assume their responsibility for safety in production, import, distribution, and sale of food. On February 14, 2011, the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Department of Health, issued a draft notification amending standards of the Prevention of Food Adulteration Rules, 1955. The amended standards deal with the addition of nutritional ingredients in various foods, including dairy products, as well as amending standards for infant foods and other products. The notification GSR No. 92(E) dated 14.02.2011, is available on the FSSAI?s website and can be accessed at: GSR No. 92(E) dated 14.02.2011. While the FSSAI sets standards for the safety of domestically produced and imported milk and milk products into India, the Ministry of Agriculture?s DAHD is responsible for issuing sanitary permits for the import of milk and milk products into India. The department has also created the sanitary import protocol for the import of bovine semen in India and is actively working to strengthen the Indian dairy sector. In 2011, India revised the guidelines for the import/export of bovine germplasm. The new revised guidelines are available on DAHD?s website and can be accessed at: Guidelines for export /import of bovine germplasm (Revised 2011). (Please refer GAIN report IN1122 for more information). Consumption: According to NDDB, total dairy production is estimated to be growing at 4 percent annually while demand for milk is growing at approximately twice the growth rate of production. The major factors driving growth in milk consumption are increased demand due to population growth, growing household incomes, increased demand for value-added milk products, and the preference for fluid milk as a principal protein source across all age groups in India. Given India?s strong demand for dairy products, India consumes nearly all the dairy and dairy products it can produce. Indian consumption of nonfat dry milk is forecast to surpass Indian production in 2012, reflecting the small but growing deficit in dairy production and the need for increased supplies. 2012 fluid milk consumption is set to match 2012 fluid milk production. Butter consumption exceeded domestic production in 2010 and is forecast to do so again in 2011 and 2012. PROCESSING The Indian processed dairy sector is expanding. Industry estimates suggest around 15-percent growth in the processed dairy segment in next five years. Sources indicate that growth in the processed dairy sector is being driven by an expanding middle class which is demanding a greater diversity of choices. Growth is further being enabled by the expansion of modern retail facilities, especially in tier 1 cities. Products such as yogurts, ice creams, dairy drinks, and western-style cheeses, as well as dairy products with enhanced nutritional properties are growing in popularity. Given this scenario, the processed dairy sector is likely poised for growth, although this will rely greatly on the stability of dairy supply as well as the expansion of necessary infrastructure and the cold chain system. Trade: Export: Post has revised CY 2011 estimates for export of NFDM to zero based on India?s prohibition of milk powder exports. Specifically, on February 18, 2011, the GOI prohibited the export of milk powders (including skimmed milk powder, whole milk powder, dairy whitener and dairy-based infant formula, casein and casein products) in order to help control rising Indian dairy prices, which have risen by about 20 percent in the retail market and by 12 per cent at the wholesale level over the last year. The move to ban exports came ahead of the summer season, which generally witnesses a dip in milk production. According to industry sources, it is believed that milk prices will continue to rise over the short to medium term due to sustained demand and increasing production costs resulting in a possible extension of the export ban for a second year in 2012. Post therefore forecasts ?nil? exports of NFDM in CY 2011 and 2012. Exports of NFDM for CY 2010 have been revised upwards to 18,000 metric tons, reflecting strong export demand, coupled with good production. Prior to banning milk powder exports in 2011, India exported various categories of dairy products including milk powders, baby foods, butter and other fats, casein, milk and cream, cheese, and whey products. Milk powder exports constituted more than 40 percent of the total dairy exports in volume terms during CY 2010, followed by casein and its derivatives (21 percent), butter and other fats (19 percent), and other processed dairy products. India exported around 50 percent of its total dairy product shipments to Bangladesh, Nepal, the United States, U.A.E, and Singapore during CY 2010. Given strong domestic demand and prices, India typically only exports a small percentage of its total dairy production. Some occasional NFDM or butter exports will occur if favorable prices and demand in neighboring markets occur. Due to strong domestic demand, CY 2011 butter exports are revised downwards to 6,000 metric tons. Total CY 2012 exports of butter are forecast at 5,000 metric tons, reflecting expected strong domestic and demand. CY 2010 butter exports are revised upwards to 11,000 metric tons based on updated GOI export statistics which reflect high production and demand in the international market in 2010. Imports: Due to strong domestic demand and concern over seasonal shortages, the GOI has allowed NDDB duty-free imports of NFDM up to 50,000 tons and 15,000 tons of butter and butter oil at zero duty during 2011-12 (April-March). While only 30,000 metric tons of NFDM was allowed duty-free in 2010, the quota was expanded in spring 2011 to 50,000 metric tons. Thus, post has revised CY 2011 NFDM imports to 45,000 metric tons. As that there is no indication at this point that NFDM duties will again be expanded to 50,000 metric tons in 2012, post forecasts 2012 NFDM imports at 30,000 metric tons. CY 2010 NFDM imports have been revised down by 5,000 metric tons to 20,000 metric tons, based on revised GOI export statistics. India typically imports butter oil. Production, supply and demand estimates (PSD) are shown in butter, adjusted to its butter oil equivalent. CY 2012 butter imports are forecast at 20,000 metric tons assuming that the tariff rate quota (TRQ) will remain at zero duty for 15,000 metric tons. CY 2011 butter imports are revised upwards to 20,000 metric tons against a previous estimate of 5,000 metric tons, as the government rolled over last year?s (April 2010-March 2011) zero duty TRQ of 15,000 metric tons of butter, butter oil and anhydrous milk fat to the current year (April 2011-March 2012). CY 2010 imports increased to 25,000 metric tons following the government?s liberalization of ?duty free? imports of butter oil in March 2010. Duty free imports in 2010 were allowed due to concerns about a deficient monsoon and expected significant production drops which never materialized in 2010. India may need to resort to imports if it fails to address milk supply deficit concerns ?Considering that the requirement of milk in 2021-22 is expected to be 180 million tons and the current level of milk production is 112 million tons, the milk production must increase at around 5.5 percent per annum in the next 12 years. If it fails to do so, India may need to resort to imports from the world market. A large consumer like India entering the international market would have the potential to cause international prices to spurt. Hence it is prudent that we depend on the domestic market and develop the milk sector with the right attention and focus and the required investment. Recent hikes in prices of milk and milk products have been a matter of concern. The gap between domestic demand for milk and production of milk has put upward pressure on milk prices in the country. A strong supply response with focus on production and productivity can only keep the prices stable.? (Source: Chapter 8: Agriculture and food Management, Economic Survey- 2010-11, Government of India, Ministry of Finance, Department of Economic Affairs.) Policy: Trade Policy: India allows imports of milk and milk products without any quantitative limitations, although tariff rate quotas apply and import permit is required. NFDM imported above the tariff rate quota attracts a basic duty of 60 percent while above quota imports of butter oil are charged a basic duty of 40 percent. Table 1, at the end of this report, gives an account of the tariff structure of various dairy products. Historically, India has only imported limited quantities of milk powder and butter because domestic production has been able to meet general requirements. As incomes and population grow, (and consequently consumption), India may require additional supplies and imports of butter and NFDM, absent significant domestic production growth. India consistently exports milk powders, (particularly casein), although these exports constitute a small percentage of India?s total production. Although India allows milk and milk product imports, in most cases, both import permits and sanitary certificates are required. For the import of livestock products (including milk and milk products), an applicant has to apply at least 30 days in advance with form A/B (Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying). Exports of U.S. dairy products to India are effectively prohibited under India?s current dairy sanitary import protocol. Imported dairy products, like domestic dairy products, must adhere to all relevant food safety laws and quality standards. These include the quality standards set by the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) as well as the food safety standards covered in the Food Safety and Standards Regulation, 2011. (For details please refer to IN1174 on India Enforces the New Food Safety Law). On January 3, 2011, the Ministry of Commerce and Industry released an extension to its earlier notification to prohibit the import of dairy products (including milk and milk products) from China with effect from December 24, 2010 for one year and until further orders. The import ban was based on the recommendation of the Food Safety and Standards Authority and was taken as a precautionary measure after melamine adulteration was found in Chinese milk powder imports. (Related notification number 16 (RE ? 2010)/2009-2014 was issued by the Directorate General of Foreign Trade, and can be accessed at DGFT) Table 1-India: Tariff Structure for Various Dairy Products TOTAL DUTY WITH 3 PERCENT SPL EDUCATION IMPORT HS CODE ITEM DESCRIPTION BASIC CVD CVD CESS POLICY 04011000 - Milk and cream, not concentrated nor containing 30 0 0 30.900 Free SanP 04013000 added sugar or other sweetening matter 04021010 Milk and cream, concentrated or containing added 60 0 4 68.272 Free SanP sugar or other sweetening matter 04021020 - Milk and cream, concentrated or containing added 60 0 4 68.272 Free SanP 04021090 sugar or other sweetening matter 04022100 Milk and cream, not containing added sugar or 60 0 4 68.272 Free SanP other sweetening matter 040229 Other: whole milk, milk for babies, other 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP 04029110 Condensed milk 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP 04029190 Other 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP 040299 Other: whole milk, condensed milk 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP 0403 Buttermilk, curdled milk and cream, yogurt, 30 0 0 30.900 Free SanP kephir & other fermented or acidified milk & cream, whether or not concentrated or containing added sugar or other sweetening matter or flavored or containing added fruits, nuts or coco 0404 Whey, whether or not concentrated or containing 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP added sugar or other sweetening matter; products consisting of natural milk constituents, whether or not containing added sugar or other sweetening matter, not elsewhere specified or include Butter and other fats and oils derived from milk; Free SanP 0405 dairy spreads 40 0 4 46.848 Fresh (unripened or uncured) cheese, including Free SanP 04061000 whey cheese & curd 30 0 0 30.900 04062000 Grated or powdered cheese of all kinds 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP 04063000 Processed cheese not grated or powdered 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP 04064000 Blue-veined cheese and other cheese containing 30 0 4 36.136 Free SanP veins produced by Pencillium roqueforti 04069000 Other cheese 40 0 4 46.848 Free SanP Lactose and lactose syrup containing by weight 25 10.30 4 45.752 Free 99 percent or more lactose, expressed as 170211 anhydrous lactose, calculated on the dry matter Ice cream and other edible ice, whether or not 30 0 4 36.136 Free 21050000 containing cocoa Casein, Caseinates and other casein derivatives; 20 10.30 4 38.664 Free 3501 casein glues Basic- Basic import duty applicable on assessable value (CIF value plus 1 percent landing charges). CVD- Countervailing duty (applicable on assessable value plus total basic duty). SPL CVD- Special countervailing duty is 4 percent applicable on assessable value plus total basic duty and total CVD. Education Cess- A 3 percent import duty levied to finance India?s education system. San P- Sanitary Permit Effective March 2010, a TRQ was established for NFDM, under which imports of up to 30,000 metric tons are allowed at a nil basic tariff, and quantities above that level at a basic tariff of 60 percent. This TRQ was expanded to 50,000 metric tons for the April-March 2011/12 year. Effective March 2010, a TRQ was established for butter, butter oil, and anhydrous milk fat, under which imports of up to 15,000 metric tons are allowed at a nil basic tariff, and quantities above that level at a basic tariff of 40 percent. The Education Cess of 3 percent on customs valuation is exempted with effect from July 9, 2004, on HS 0402 10, 0402 2100, 0405 1000 & 0405 90. The Education Cess of 3 percent is exempted with effect from July 9, 2004, on dairy-spreads with a milk fat content of at least 75 percent but less than 80 percent by weight, falling under tariff HS 0405 20 00. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Table 2: Commodity, Dairy, Milk, Fluid, PSD 2010 2011 2012 Dairy, Milk, Fluid Market Year Begin: Market Year Begin: Market Year Begin: India Jan 2010 Apr 2011 Jan 2012 USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Cows In Milk 43,600 43,600 44,900 44,900 46,200 (1000 HEAD) Cows Milk Production 50,300 50,300 52,500 52,500 55,000 (1000 MT) Other Milk Production 66,700 66,700 69,000 69,000 72,000 (1000 MT) Total Production 117,000 117,000 121,500 121,500 127,000 (1000 MT) Other Imports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Imports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Supply 117,000 117,000 121,500 121,500 127,000 (1000 MT) Other Exports 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Exports 5 5 5 5 0 (1000 MT) Fluid Use Dom. Consum. 49,140 49,140 53,240 53,240 53,900 (1000 MT) Factory Use Consum. 67,855 67,855 68,255 68,255 73,100 (1000 MT) Feed Use Dom. Consum. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Dom. Consumption 116,995 116,995 121,495 121,495 127,000 (1000 MT) Total Distribution 117,000 117,000 121,500 121,500 127,000 (1000 MT) CY Imp. from U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) CY. Exp. to U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) TS=TD 0 0 0 Table 3: Commodity, Dairy, Milk, Nonfat Dry, PSD 2010 2011 2012 Dairy, Milk, Nonfat Dry, Market Year Begin: Market Year Begin: Market Year Begin: India Apr 2010 Apr 2011 Apr 2012 USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Beginning Stocks 8 8 30 0 0 (1000 MT) Production 375 380 410 410 450 (1000 MT) Other Imports 25 20 0 45 30 (1000 MT) Total Imports 25 20 0 45 30 (1000 MT) Total Supply 408 408 440 455 480 (1000 MT) Other Exports 10 18 15 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Exports 10 18 15 0 0 (1000 MT) Human Dom. Consumption 368 390 415 455 480 (1000 MT) Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Dom. Consumption 368 390 415 455 480 (1000 MT) Total Use 378 408 430 455 480 (1000 MT) Ending Stocks 30 0 10 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Distribution 408 408 440 455 480 (1000 MT) CY Imp. from U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) CY. Exp. to U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) TS=TD 0 0 0 Table 4: Commodity, Dairy, Butter, PSD 2010 2011 2012 Dairy, Butter Market Year Begin: Market Year Begin: Market Year Begin: India Apr 2010 Apr 2011 Apr 2012 USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 6 0 (1000 MT) Production 4,155 4,162 4,325 4,320 4,500 (1000 MT) Other Imports 19 25 5 20 20 (1000 MT) Total Imports 19 25 5 20 20 (1000 MT) Total Supply 4,174 4,187 4,330 4,346 4,520 (1000 MT) Other Exports 4 11 10 6 5 (1000 MT) Total Exports 4 11 10 6 5 (1000 MT) Domestic Consumption 4,170 4,170 4,320 4,340 4,515 (1000 MT) Total Use 4,174 4,181 4,330 4,346 4,520 (1000 MT) Ending Stocks 0 6 0 0 0 (1000 MT) Total Distribution 4,174 4,187 4,330 4,346 4,520 (1000 MT) CY Imp. from U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) CY. Exp. to U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 (1000 MT) TS=TD 0 0 0
Posted: 31 October 2011

See more from Food , Beverages and Tobacco in India

Expert Views    
Seafood Industry - India   By Crosstree techno-visors
Cold Chain for Agri-Produce   By Crosstree techno-visors
Retail Foods 2012   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Hot Tips    
Coffee Production in India   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Livestock Sector in India   By Foreign Agricultural Service