Fresh Foods and Vegetables Retain Access to Jakarta

An Expert's View about Horticulture and Support Services in Indonesia

Posted on: 11 Sep 2012

Countries with recognized food safety systems for fresh foods of plant origin (FFPO) could retain access to the Port of Jakarta for their fresh fruit and vegetable exports.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Voluntary Public - Date: 8/28/2012 GAIN Report Number: ID1225 Indonesia Post: Jakarta U.S. Fresh Foods and Vegetables Retain Access to the Port of Jakarta Report Categories: Export Accomplishments - Other Approved By: Jonn Slette Prepared By: Fahwani Y. Rangkuti Report Highlights: The countries with recognized food safety systems for fresh foods of plant origin (FFPO), which currently include Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States, could retain access to the Port of Jakarta for their fresh fruit and vegetable exports. The Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) officially confirmed the status of the aforementioned recognized countries in Regulations No. 42 and No. 43/2012, which were announced in July 2012. General Information: WHAT, WHERE, AND WHEN In late December 2011, the Government of Indonesia (GOI) announced its intention to close several ports, including the seaport of Jakarta, Tanjung Priok, to a variety of imported fruit and vegetables. The GOI further announced that the only ports eligible to accept most horticultural imports, including U.S products, were the seaports in Surabaya, Medan, Makasar and Jakarta’s Soekarno-Hatta International Airport. More than ninety percent of U.S. fresh fruit enters Indonesia through Tanjung Priok. On June 19, the scheduled date of implementation, the Ministry of Agriculture announced through a press release that countries with recognized food safety systems for fresh foods of plant origin (FFPO), which currently include Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States, could retain access to the Port of Jakarta for their fresh fruit and vegetable exports. The Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) officially confirmed the status of the aforementioned recognized countries in Regulations No. 42 and No. 43/2012, which were announced in July 2012. HOW The Ministry of Agriculture issued a series of related regulations regarding the closure of Tanjung Priok, to include Regulation Numbers 88, 89 and 90/2011 (December 2011); Regulation No. 15 and No. 16/2012 (March 2012); and Regulation No. 42 and No. 43/2012 (June 2012). Since the initial regulations were issued, the Office of Agricultural Affairs, Jakarta, spearheaded negotiations with the MOA, the Ministry of Trade and the Coordinating Ministry for Economic Affairs to resolve the matter. These efforts also included strong support by USDA, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, and the Department of State. Because of strong, interagency diplomatic advocacy, U.S. stakeholders were able to maintain access for U.S. horticultural products through Tanjung Priok. During the final months of 2009 the GOI recognized the U.S. food safety system for FFPO under a separate and regulatory requirement. Because, Regulations No. 88 and No. 89 initially cited food safety and quarantine risks at the GOI’s primary concerns with regard to limiting port access for horticultural imports, the United States argued that because Indonesia had some plant quarantine protocols in place, and the aforementioned recognition of the U.S. food safety system for FFPO, Indonesian’s justification for limiting port access were not science-based vis-à-vis U.S. FFPO imports. WHY In 2011, U.S. fresh fruit exports to Indonesia were roughly $110 million. As mentioned, the vast majority of imported U.S. FFPO products enter Indonesian through Tanjung Priok, as the Jakarta area market is the largest for most imported consumer goods, including horticultural products.
Posted: 11 September 2012

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