Israeli Citrus Sector 2012

An Expert's View about Citrus Fruits in Israel

Posted on: 1 Jan 2013

Post forecasts Israel’s MY 2012/2013 citrus production at roughly 600 thousand metric tons, up 3 percent compared to MY 2011/2012.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 12/26/2012 Israel Citrus Annual Israeli Citrus Sector Approved By: Jonathan P. Gressel Agricultural Minister Counselor U.S. Embassy, Cairo Prepared By: Gilad Shachar and Mariano J. Beillard Report Highlights: Post forecasts Israel’s MY 2012/2013 citrus production at roughly 600 thousand metric tons, up 3 percent compared to MY 2011/2012. The increase is driven by an upswing in production of mandarins (or tangerines) and oranges. Post forecasts an increase of 5 percent in Israeli citrus exports in MY 2012/2013. Deliveries to processing plants will remain largely unchanged. Exports to the United States, Canada, Japan, and South Korea are trending upwards, but remain a small percentage of total exports. Mandarins (47 percent) and grapefruit (44 percent) make up the bulk of Israel’s citrus exports. The Or (or Orri) mandarin variety alone accounts for 26 percent of total citrus exports. Executive Summary: Israel is a medium-sized producer and exporter of citrus fruit. Post forecasts that Israel’s citrus production in MY 2012/2013 will reach 601 thousand metric tons (TMT), up 3 percent compared to the MY 2011/2012 season. We expect that Israel will export roughly 187 TMT, or 31 percent of its harvest. We are anticipating that Israel will likely process once some 234 TMT, or 39 percent of the crop. The balance of 179 TMT will be consumed locally as fresh citrus fruit. A very good harvest in MY 2011/2012, allowed Israel’s citrus production to reach 586 TMT, a 29 percent increase compared to the previous season. About a third of the production or some 178 TMT (31 percent) were allocated to exports. While 232 TMT (39 percent) was processed; the balance of 176 TMT was consumed domestically as fresh citrus fruit. Strong competition in Israel’s traditional European markets is forcing exporters to look further afield to developing markets in the United States, Canada, Japan, South Korea, and Australia. Commodities: Grapefruit, Fresh Tangerines/Mandarins, Fresh Oranges, Fresh Lemons, Fresh Orange Juice Production: Post forecasts that MY 2012/2013 total production should reach about 601 TMT, a 3 percent increase compared to MY 2011/2012. Israeli citrus production in MY 2011/2012 reached 586 TMT, representing a 29 percent increase compared to the previous marketing year. A very good harvest in MY 2011/2012 allowed oranges and mandarins to recover MY 2010/2011’s lost ground. Production yields are now more in line with the multi-year average. In addition, an increase number of mandarin (mainly the Or varietal) trees have now entered the fruit-bearing stage. Table 1: Citrus Production by Varieties, thousand metric tons Mandarins MY er Total Oranges (easy Lemons/Limes Grape Othfruit peeler Ci 1 trus Production s) 2007/08 125 145 35 242 13 560 2008/09 155 139 29 232 12 567 2009/10 148 150 48 235 14 595 2010/11 100 125 30 190 10 455 2011/12 116 166 53 245 6 586 2012/13* 130 175 56 235 5 601 Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. *Forecast: Based on information collected. (1) Other Citrus includes red and white pomelos, kumquat, limquat, ethrog (citron). The Israeli citrus sector is striving to improve the efficiency of its operations and fruit quality. Growers are seeking lower seed content, longer shelf life, better looking fruit, and an extended marketing season. To reach these goals, growers are introducing new technologies and varieties to boost production yields while minimizing the impact on resources and the environment. Ecologically-oriented agricultural norms are increasingly taking root in the citrus industry. Producers are aiming to grow “greener,” more environmentally friendly fruit using minimal or no chemical fertilizers. The citrus industry is adhering to the European market’s quality management requirements; especially EUREP GAP 2000, ISO Standards, and crop management protocols. To cut back on the use of chemical pesticides, 65 percent of Israeli citrus groves use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs. In lieu of chemical pesticides, IPM programs utilize natural control agents such as parasitic wasps, sterilized Mediterranean fruit flies (Ceratitis capitata) or medfly, and predatory insects. Oranges – Post forecasts that orange production in MY 2012/2013 will reach 130 TMT, an increase of roughly 12 percent. We expect production levels of about 50 TMT of Shamuti, 28 TMT of Valencias, and some 35 TMT of navel oranges. Better growing conditions in MY 2011/2012 mitigated pest infestations, allowing orange production to reach 116 TMT, up by 16 TMT or 16 percent compared to the previous marketing year. Shamuti and navel oranges remain Israel’s two main commercial orange varieties despite declining cultivation in recent years. Tangerines/ Mandarins (Easy Peelers) – Post forecasts total mandarin production in MY 2012/2013 at 175 TMT, and potentially reaching 200 TMT by 2015. We expect production levels of 65 TMT for Ors, 27 TMT for Novas, 19 TMT for Michals, 16 TMT for Minneolas, and about 8.4 to 8.5 TMT for Murcotts and Oras. Israeli citrus growers have been expanding the number of mandarin plantations since 2009. This expansion in coming years will further spur easy peeler production. Israel’s leading easy peeler is the Or varietal. Although yields were very high in MY 2011/2012, the mandarin harvest suffered overall from small fruit size. Grapefruit – The star ruby sunrise varietal is the main citrus fruit variety exported by Israel. Post forecasts that in MY 2012/2013, Israel will produce 235 TMT of grapefruit, a 4 percent down compared to the previous year. The decrease is mainly as a result of white grapefruit uprooting in recent years. We expect that out of this total production, red fruit will account for 140 TMT. White grapefruit and sweeties follow with 65 and 30 TMT respectively. Lemons and Limes – MY 2012/2013’s lemon and lime production at 56 TMT, nearly 6 percent increase compared to the previous year. Lemons and limes are mostly consumed locally. Other Citrus – Competition from China-origin pomelo in foreign import markets is forcing Israeli citrus growers to scale back on white and red pomelo production for export. Post forecasts Israeli pomelo production to reach 4 TMT in MY 2012/2013. Kumquat and limquat production should reach 1 TMT in MY 2012/2013. Table 2: Citrus Type Share of Total Production, Percentage Mandarins MY ther Total Oranges (easy Lemons/Limes Grapefru Oit peeler Ci 1 trus Production s) 2007/08 22.3 25.9 6.3 43.2 2.3 100 2008/09 27.3 24.5 5.1 40.9 2.2 100 2009/10 24.9 25.2 8.1 39.0 2.8 100 2010/11 22.0 27.5 6.6 41.7 2.2 100 2011/12 19.8 28.6 9.0 41.9 0.7 100 2012/13* 21.6 29.1 9.3 39.1 0.8 100 Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. *Forecast: Post estimates. (1) Other Citrus includes red and white pomelos, kumquat, limquat, ethrog (citron). Table 3: Citrus Utilization, Destination, metric tons Period Total Exports Delivery to Processors Local Fresh Market MY Quantity % Quantity % Quantity % Total Percent 2007/08 172,059 30.7 212,097 37.9 175,844 31.4 100 2008/09 173,576 30.6 223,310 39.4 170,277 30.0 100 2009/10 179,238 30.0 182,203 30.6 234,531 39.4 100 2010/11 154,996 34.1 139,906 30.7 160,000 35.2 100 2011/12 177,974 30.4 231,602 39.5 176,424 30.1 100 2012/13 187,000 31.2 234,000 39.0 179,000 29.6 100 Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Crop Area Citrus planted areas total 19,056 hectares (ha) in 2012. Fruit-bearing trees account for roughly 16,580 ha, or 87 percent of total planted area. Starting in January 2009, Israeli citrus growers began replacing some 3,800 ha of less-profitable oranges (i.e., mainly Shamuti and Valencia varieties), white grapefruit, and pomelos with the Or (or Orri) mandarin (or tangerine) easy peeler variety. Or mandarins account for about 70 percent of the 5,400 ha planted since 2009. It is a late season, mostly seedless fruit, normally harvested from January to May in Israel. The Or is a local mandarin variety (a hybrid of Temple and Dancy varieties) developed by Israel’s Volcani Institute of Agricultural Research. The bulk of the Israeli citrus industry is located in Central (48 percent) and Southern Israel (31 percent). However, there is also significant citrus production in Northern Israel (21 percent). Table 4: Citrus Orchards by Variety, Hectares and Percentage Hectares % Grapefruit 4,150 22 Oranges 4,150 22 Mandarins (easy 8,450 44 peelers) Lemons and Limes 1,920 10 Pomelos and Others 386 2 Total 19,056 100% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Table 5: Citrus Orchards by Area, Hectares and Percentage Hectares % Northern Israel 4,002 21 Central Israel 9,147 48 Southern Israel 5,907 31 Total 19,056 100% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Consumption: Post estimates local consumption of fresh citrus fruit in MY 2012/2013 at about 179 TMT, up by 2 percent from the previous marketing year. About 25 TMT, or 14 percent of total consumption is absorbed by the Palestinian Authority (PA). We estimate per capita consumption of citrus in Israel at about 20 kilograms per annum. Per capita consumption in the PA administered West Bank is calculated at 9.5 kilograms. The Central Intelligence Agency estimates (July 2012) Israel’s population at roughly 7.7 million and the West Bank’s population at 2.6 million. The Israeli Citrus Processing Industry Two groups control Israel’s citrus processing industry. There are only three citrus processing plants in Israel. Citrus producers’ deliveries to processing plants in MY 2011/2012 registered a total of nearly 232 TMT, a 66 percent increase compared to the previous marketing year. About two-thirds of citrus deliveries were grapefruit. Table 6: Delivery to the Processing Plants, metric tons 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 Tons % Tons % Tons % Tons % Oranges 53,500 24 45,772 25 18 38,092 16 Grapefruit 141,674 63 107,076 59 63 153,008 66 Mandarins 25,408 11 26,840 15 23,037 16 37,723 16 Lemons 2,728 1 2,515 1 2,368 2 2,631 1 Total 223,310 100 182,203 100 139,906 100 231,454 100 Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Post finds that citrus processing prices commanded a premium in MY 2011/2012 despite higher supply volumes. Prices paid on average where: Red grapefruit - $120/tons White grapefruit - $180/ton Oranges - $170/ton Mandarins - $80/ton With the ongoing decline in orange production in Israel, processing plants are turning to overseas sources (mainly Brazil) for oranges for processing. Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice Israeli processors produce concentrates, juice, bases, puree, and slices. About 70 percent of these products are exported to the European Union (EU), the rest is consumed domestically. Annual per capita consumption of juices and nectars is roughly 4-5 liters. This amount is increasing due to the decrease in consumption of carbonated soft drinks. With local orange production contracting in recent years, FCOJ imports have increased significantly. In calendar year 2011, orange juice imports reached $48 million, up 138 percent compared to the previous year. Roughly 30,000 metric tons of FCOJ were imported in 2011. The combination of pest infestation, along with inclement weather in 2010 adversely affected Israel’s orange crop, driving up FCOJ imports in 2011. Better growing conditions in MY 2011/2012 and MY 2012/2013 are leading to orange production increases that will limit the need of imports for processing in 2013. Post estimates that in 2013 imports of orange juice will fall to about 24,500 metric tons, dropping by 1,500 metric tons or 6 percent compared to the previous calendar year. Trade: Post forecasts Israel’s exports of citrus in MY 2012/2013 to reach about 187 TMT, up by About 5 percent compared to the previous marketing year. Export growth is being driven by Or mandarins’ good receptivity in the European market. However, profitability hinges on fruit size as evidenced by the 22 percent drop in per ton profit in MY 2011/2012 due to smaller fruit size (e.g., sizes 3 and 4) predominating. Total citrus exports in MY 2011/12 increased by nearly 15 percent compared to the previous marketing year. Post finds that mandarins (47 percent) and grapefruit (44 percent) in MY 2011/2012 make up the bulk of Israel’s citrus exports. The Or mandarin variety alone accounts for 26 percent of total citrus exports. Oranges (Shamuti and navel) on the other hand continue to see their export market share drop. These have dropped to 7.3 percent within the citrus export mix in MY 2011/2012; down from 12 percent in MY 2009/2010. Table 7: Fresh Citrus Exports by Varieties, metric tons 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2011/12 % Chg. vs. 2010/2011 Oranges 30,396 26,997 21,753 12,464 13,007 -4.3% Grapefruit 81,110 85,180 84,418 82,731 77,817 -5.9% Mandarins 50,112 54,695 67,984 56,269 83,252 48.0% Lemon and Lime 4,024 1,988 1,877 501 834 66.5%s Other Citrus 6,417 4,716 3,206 3,031 3,064 1.1% Grand Total 172,059 173,576 179,238 154,996 177,974 14.8% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Chart 1: Major Citrus Varieties, MY 2011/12, Percentage of Total Exports Others 10% Red Grapefruit 32% White Grapefruit 3% Sweetie 9% Or 26% Shamuti 6% Minneolas 5% Nova 9% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. In just 10 years, Israeli citrus marketing has changed dramatically. Previously exclusively controlled by the Citrus Marketing Board of Israel, citrus marketing is now managed by a group of 50 authorized private citrus exporters. Within this grouping, Mehadrin is the country’s largest grower and exporter of quality citrus. Export Market Destinations Europe – European markets import almost 90 percent of Israel’s citrus exports. Specifically Western Europe absorbs 68 percent of Israeli citrus exports, while Russia and the Ukraine combined take in 21 percent. However, we have noticed that in MY 2011/2012 the North American market, as well as the Far East markets of Japan, South Korea, and Singapore along with Australia are demanding greater volumes of Israeli citrus. We anticipate this upward trend to continue in MY 2012/2013. Far East - Exports to Japan of grapefruit (sweetie) in MY 2011/2012 decreased by nearly 12 percent from the previous marketing year, dropping from 3.6 MT to 3.2 MT. Post nonetheless anticipates that grapefruit (sweetie) exports will recover in MY 2012/2013, increasing by about 15 percent compared to the previous year. Similarly we find that red pomelo exports will climb by 100 percent in MY 2012/2013 due to the possibility of shipping earlier than normal. Or mandarin exports to Japan are expected to reach 200 MT in MY 2012/2013. South Korea is expected to import about 2 TMT of Israeli citrus fruit in MY 2012/2013, up by 80 percent compared to the previous marketing year. South Korea is once more authorizing imports of all Israeli citrus fruits in MY 2012/2013. Exports to China in MY 2012/2013 in contrast are expected to reach only 500 MT, down 80 percent compared to the previous marketing year. China since MY 2011/2012 has been raising sanitary and phyto-sanitary (SPS) barriers against Israeli citrus fruits. Table 8: Israeli Fresh Citrus Export to Japan, number of cases 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 Sweetie 269,160 249,000 220,112 Red Pomelo 4,064 5,208 1,092 White Grapefruit 8,840 11,552 0 Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Table 9: Citrus Exports, Far East plus Australia, metric tons, MY 2011/2012 Japan 3,194 China 2,543 South Korea 1,132 Singapore 414 Australia 966 Total 8,249 Percent of Total Exports 8,249/ 177,974=4.6% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. U.S. and Canada – Post anticipates that exports of Israeli citrus to the North American market in MY 2012/2013 will reach 11,000 tons, up 50 percent compared to the previous marketing year. Mandarins will remain the primary export. Previously in MY 2011/2012, citrus exports to North America had gone up by 180 percent compared to MY 2010/2011. Israeli exporters are actively targeting the North American market. Table 10: Citrus Exports, North America, metric tons 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2011/12 % Chg. vs. 2010/2011 United States 2,024 1,352 2,578 91% Canada 967 1,366 4,953 263% Total 2,991 2,718 7,531 177% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Oranges – Post anticipates exports of oranges to reach 13.5 TMT in MY 2012/2013, an increase of 4 percent compared to the previous marketing year. We find that higher than normal supplies of oranges will allow Israeli exporters to offer these at more competitive prices in MY 2012/2013. Israel’s Shamuti orange exports in MY 2011/2012 were down due to increasing competition from rival orange exporting countries. Table 11: Oranges Varieties Exports, metric tons 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2011/12 % Chg. vs. 2010/2011 Navels 1,843 1,895 663 482 -27% Shamuti 17,449 17,302 8,696 10,733 23% Valencia 7,705 2,461 3,051 1,717 -44% Total 26,997 21,658 12,410 12,932 4% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Tangerines/Mandarins (Easy Peelers) – Post forecasts total mandarin exports in MY 2012/2013 to reach about 93 TMT, a 12 percent increase compared to the previous marketing year. Ramped up local production is stepping up to meet growing foreign import demand. Already in MY 2011/2012 Or mandarins reached a record high of 46 TMT, up 50 percent compared to the previous marketing year. We anticipate that in MY 2012/2013 the Or mandarin variety will by itself reach 50 TMT, up 8 percent compared to the previous marketing year. Sources indicate that Or mandarin exports will likely reach 92 TMT in MY 2014/2015, up by 190 percent when compared to MY 2010/2011. The bulk of Or mandarins exports occur between January and March. Table 12: Mandarins (easy-peelers) Varieties Exports, metric tons 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 11/12 % Chg. vs. 2011/12 20 2010/2011 Minneola 6,901 11,667 6,964 9,077 30% Nova 17,829 18,628 11,684 16,267 39% Or 17,956 25,973 30,986 46,388 49% Others 12,009 11,716 6,438 11,520 49% Total 54,695 67,984 56,072 83,252 48% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Grapefruit – Post forecasts Israeli grapefruit production in MY 2012/2013 at roughly 70 TMT, 10 percent down from the previous marketing year. Israel’s grapefruit production in MY 2012/2013 started strong, but is now evidencing signs of a gradual slowdown. Growing competition from Spain and Turkey, based on proximity and lower shipping costs, routinely undercut Israeli export prices. Israel’s competitive advantage is based on an earlier start to the harvest season. This allows Israel to fill the production gap between the end of the South African season and availability of fruit from Florida (United States), Spain, and Turkey. Israeli grapefruit exporters actively target consumers in Italy, France, Germany, the Ukraine, and Russia. Exports of red grapefruit in MY 2011/2012 increased by 5 percent compared to the previous marketing year. Post estimates that red grapefruit makes up 75 percent of total exports. Exports of white grapefruit reached 6.6 TMT in MY 2010/2011, declining by 38 percent compared to the previous marketing year. The drop is attributable to decreased Japanese demand for the sweetie grapefruit variety. Table 13: Grapefruit Varieties Exports, metric tons 2008/09 Chg. vs. 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2011/12 % 2010/2011 White 11,480 10,764 6,627 4,520 -32% Grapefruit Red Grapefruit 60,338 61,215 64,025 58,135 -9% Sweetie 13,362 12,439 12,051 15,162 26% Total 85,180 84,418 82,703 77,817 -6% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Other Citrus – Israel’s exports of white pomelos in MY 2011/2012 at 1.3 TMT were up 19 percent compared to the previous marketing year. However, its exports of red pomelos at 1.1 TMT were down about 17 percent. Post estimates that due to China’s strong presence in the market, Israeli citrus growers will further scale back pomelo production. We anticipate a drop of about 20 percent in the next few years given pomelo’s declining commercial profitability. Table 14: Grapefruit Varieties Exports, metric tons 2009/10 2010/11 2 % Chg. vs. 2011/12 2011/1 2010/2011 Red Pomelo 1,315 1,340 1,118 -17% White Pomelo 944 1,084 1,291 19% Limquat and 539 398 439 10% Kumquat Lemons 1,877 501 834 66% Lime 408 209 216 3% Total 5,083 3,532 3,898 10% Source: The Plants Production and Marketing Board, Citrus Division, Israel. Policy: Post is unaware of any significant policy issues impacting local production. Israel’s exports are also largely free of adverse policy considerations. Exports of U.S. citrus to Israel are not currently permissible. A Pest Risk Assessment (PRA) has not been conducted for U.S. citrus. Until a PRA is performed, U.S. citrus is not allowed to enter Israel. Indications are that even should Israel’s Plant and Protection Service conduct a PRA for U.S. citrus, high shipping costs will hinder U.S. citrus exports to Israel. Table 15: Tariff-rate Quotas, U.S. Fresh Citrus, Orange and Grapefruit Juices, U.S.-Israel Agreement on Trade in Agricultural Products Description Total Quota (metric tons) Duty Oranges* 1,689 0% Lemons* 506 0% Grapefruit* 1,689 0% Other Citrus 689 0% (non-easy peelers)* 1, Frozen Orange Juice (packages over 100 154 0% kg 4,) Frozen Grapefruit Juice 0% (packages over 100 kg 1,016 ) * Requires a Pest Risk Assessment (PRA). Without a PRA the product cannot enter Israel. ** Within the quota it is duty-free. Kilograms = kg. The U.S.-Israel Agreement on Trade in Agricultural Products (ATAP) grants U.S.-origin frozen orange juice (FCOJ) exporters a duty free tariff-rate quota (TRQ) of 4,154 metric ton, as well as a 1,016 metric ton frozen grapefruit juice TRQ. Marketing: In Israel fruit and vegetable consumption exceeds daily recommended amounts. Israelis, much like their European counterparts, are moving away from traditional citrus fruits such as oranges and grapefruit and switching to easier peeling, more compact sweeter mandarins. Industry sources confirm that this trend is widely expected to continue at the least through the medium-term. Surveys highlight that for consumers, citrus’ freshness and its flavor along with appearance and juiciness are its greatest appeal. Consumers also welcome seedless citrus varieties’ practicalities. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Oranges, Fresh Israel 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 Market Year Begin: Oct 2012 USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Area Planted 4,350 4,300 4,400 4,200 4,150 Area Harvested 3,900 3,900 3,950 3,870 3,950 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total No. Of Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Production 100 100 131 116 130 Imports 0 0 0 0 0 Total Supply 100 100 131 116 130 Exports 13 12 12 13 15 Fresh Dom. Consumption 62 63 71 65 67 For Processing 25 25 48 38 48 Total Distribution 100 100 131 116 130 HECTARES, 1000 TREES, 1000 MT Tangerines/Mandarins, Fresh Israel 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 Market Year Begin: Oct 2012 USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Area Planted 6,100 7,700 6,500 8,450 8,700 Area Harvested 4,600 5,600 4,800 6,050 6,388 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total No. Of Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Production 125 125 169 166 175 Imports 0 0 0 0 0 Total Supply 125 125 169 166 175 Exports 54 56 72 83 90 Fresh Dom. Consumption 49 46 50 45 47 For Processing 22 23 47 38 38 Total Distribution 125 125 169 166 175 HECTARES, 1000 TREES, 1000 MT Grapefruit, Fresh Israel 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 Market Year Begin: Oct 2012 USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Area Planted 4,700 4,300 4,660 4,200 4,150 Area Harvested 4,180 3,900 4,140 3,950 4,000 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total No. Of Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Production 190 190 205 245 235 Imports 0 0 0 0 0 Total Supply 190 190 205 245 235 Exports 83 83 85 78 76 Fresh Dom. Consumption 19 19 21 14 14 For Processing 88 88 99 153 145 Total Distribution 190 190 205 245 235 HECTARES, 1000 TREES, 1000 MT Lemons/Limes, Fresh Israel 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 Market Year Begin: Oct 2012 USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Area Planted 1,830 1,880 1,845 1,920 1,920 Area Harvested 1,570 1,750 1,580 1,850 1,860 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Total No. Of Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Production 30 30 61 53 56 Imports 0 0 0 0 0 Total Supply 30 30 61 53 56 Exports 1 1 3 1 2 Fresh Dom. Consumption 27 27 55 49 51 For Processing 2 2 3 3 3 Total Distribution 30 30 61 53 56 HECTARES, 1000 TREES, 1000 MT Orange Juice Israel 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 Market Year Begin: Oct 2012 USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Deliv. To Processors 25,000 25,000 46,000 38,000 48,000 Beginning Stocks 500 500 800 800 500 Production 2,300 2,300 4,200 3,500 4,430 Imports 30,000 30,000 26,400 26,000 24,500 Total Supply 32,800 32,800 31,400 30,300 29,430 Exports 16,100 16,100 15,600 14,000 13,830 Domestic Consumption 15,900 15,900 15,400 15,800 15,500 Ending Stocks 800 800 400 500 100 Total Distribution 32,800 32,800 31,400 30,300 29,430 MT
Posted: 01 January 2013

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