Pet Food Market

An Expert's View about Animal Food in Kenya

Last updated: 4 Sep 2011

Kenya has a small but growing pet food market. Kenya's pet food imports grew at an annual average rate of 27 percent in the last five calendar years (CY 2006-2010), attributed to increased pet ownership and demand for quality food.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Voluntary Public - Date: 8/8/2011 GAIN Report Number: Kenya Post: Nairobi Kenyan Pet Food Market Report Categories: Product Brief Approved By: Souleymane Diaby Prepared By: Souleymane Diaby and Carol N. Kamau Report Highlights: Kenya has a small but growing pet food market. Kenya's pet food imports grew at an annual average rate of 27 percent in the last five calendar years (CY 2006-2010), attributed to increased pet ownership and demand for quality food. Consolidators offer the best market entry strategy. General Information: Market Overview Kenya imports about $960,000 of pet food per year; however, imports nearly tripled since 2006. Kenyan importers will likely increase imports for the next few years due to growth in the number of pets and a greater demand for specific types of pet foods and pet care products. According to Euromonitor International data, the pet population including cats, dogs, doves, pigeons, and rabbits, in Kenya grew by an average of three percent per year, reaching over 8 million in CY 2010. FAS/Nairobi forecasts the pet population at nearly 9 million in CY 2012. In 2010, South Africa supplied 56 percent of the total imports, followed by the European Union with 43 percent market share. Although U.S. exports to Kenya remain negligible, two U.S. brands (Skinner and Mars) are making inroads in this market, supplied by a South African-based company. Sources: Euromonitor International for ownership; GTA for imports; and FAS/Nairobi for estimate and forecast. Import Procedures for Pet Food 1. Importer obtains Form F from the Ministry of Livestock Development - See Form F 2. The Department of Veterinary Services issues a no objection permit following approval from the Ministry of Livestock Department (Form F fully signed). The no objection permit is issued at a cost of US$11 (Kenya Shillings [Kshs. 1,000] referred to as an approval fee. 3. Advance payment of $56 (Kshs. 5,000) as part of the import declaration fee (IDF) of 2.25 percent of the cost, insurance, and freight value of the consignment, is paid to the Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA). 4. IDF sent to the supplier. Supplier ascertains product meets Kenyan standards including a health certificate (issued by a government regulatory agency of an ISO 17025 certified laboratory), and a product quality analysis report (aflatoxin, microbiological levels, and melamine tests). Import Tariffs MFN Tariffs: 10 percent Value Added Tax: 16 percent No certificate of conformity required Market Opportunities The price precludes U.S. exports in volume. However, consolidators may be able to pull together small quantities of U.S. pet food for export to Kenya as part of a larger shipment. For more information to target the Kenyan market, please contact the following: Foreign Agricultural Service Office U.S. Embassy, Nairobi Tel: (254-20) 363 6340 Email: Agnairobi@fas.usda.gov
Posted: 31 August 2011, last updated 4 September 2011