Facilitating Red Meat Trade and Avoiding Costly Delays

A Hot Tip about Animal Husbandry and Support Services in Mexico

Posted on: 27 Dec 2012

Mexican customs brokers responsible for clearing shipments have noted that meat shipments frequently arrive at their facilities without commercial invoices.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Voluntary Public - Date: 12/12/2012 GAIN Report Number: MX2092 Mexico Post: Monterrey ATO Facilitating Red Meat Trade and Avoiding Costly Delays Report Categories: Livestock and Products Agriculture in the Economy Agriculture in the News Policy and Program Announcements Promotion Opportunities Approved By: Daniel K. Berman Prepared By: Eduardo Lozano and Adam Branson Report Highlights: In order to avoid delays that add costs to U.S. shipments containing meat and meat products at the United States and Mexican border, freight forwarders and customs agents are recommending that exporters provide complete documentation, including commercial invoices, prior to when products arrive at their establishments. Without the invoices and all other documents, freight forwarders and agents are not capable of requesting product inspection by Mexican officials. General Information: The Office of Agricultural Affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City as well as the Agricultural Trade Office at the U.S. Consulate in Monterrey have been informed by Mexican industry and have heard from government officials that costly delays are occurring and preventing timely exports of U.S. red meats to Mexico. In order to facilitate trade, U.S. exporters are encouraged to provide customs agents, freight forwarders or importers with commercial invoices and all other required documents prior to loads reaching the United States and Mexican border. Mexican meat industry members and customs brokers have reported that without complete shipment documentation; especially, commercial invoices, for imported U.S.-origin meat and meat products, delays are a certainty that will result in additional costs to importers and end-users/consumers. Mexican border officials require that customs brokers present commercial invoices as part of the document dossier that accompanies shipments to Mexico. Mexican customs brokers responsible for clearing shipments have noted that meat shipments frequently arrive at their facilities without commercial invoices. As such, these shipments cannot be presented for official Mexican government inspection. This results in shipments being held at verification and inspection facilities for longer periods of time. Freight forwarders and Mexican customs brokers are reaching out to their customers and have recommended that meat exporters send a copy of the commercial invoice, via email or fax, prior to when the product arrives at their facility. With this information, Mexican customs brokers can prepare the corresponding import permit documentation (pedimento) or, official Mexican entry form and be able to pay SENASICA inspection fees and any applicable import tariffs. Note: The above information applies to all agricultural products subject to SENASICA inspection. Moreover, a commercial invoice is required to prepare any pedimento, be it for agricultural or non- agricultural products. Author Defined: For More Information FAS/Mexico Web Site: We are available at www.mexico-usda.com or visit the FAS headquarters' home page at www.fas.usda.gov for a complete selection of FAS worldwide agricultural reporting. Other Relevant Reports Submitted by FAS/Mexico: Report Subject Date Number Submitted MX2090 Mexican Pork Sector Crosses the Great Wall of China 11/30/2012 MX2089 Tariff Reduction Upsets Domestic Industry 11/30/2012 MX2087 Poultry and Egg Prices Trade Snapshot 11/29/2012 MX2065 2012 Mexican Livestock and Products Annual 9/9/2012 MX2061 Mexico Declares itself free of CSF and Avian Salmonella 8/14/2012 MX2092 Facilitating Red Meat Trade and Avoiding Costly Delays Page 2 MX2060 New Options to Obtain SENASICA Import-Export Documents 8/14/2012 MX2059 Mexico Announces Import Quotas for U.S. Eggs 8/14/2012 MX2046 Economia Opens 221K Metric Ton Egg Quota Due to Market 7/10/2012 Speculation MX2044 Avian Influenza Hits More Farms in Jalisco 7/5/2012 MX2043 Emergency Management System Activated to Combat Avian 7/2/2012 Influenza MX2040 High Path Avian Influenza Outbreak in Jalisco 6/26/2012 MX2503 Exporting to Mexico – Managing Border Entry Issues 3/22/2012 MX2016 2012 Livestock and Products Semi-Annual 3/21/2012 MX2012 2012 Poultry and Poultry Products Semi-Annual 3/20/2012 MX2004 Mexico Publishes Preliminary Determination on U.S. CLQs 1/20/2012 MX1092 New Meat and Poultry Letterhead Certificates Required 12/6/2011 Useful Mexican Web Sites: Mexico's equivalent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (SAGARPA) can be found at www.sagarpa.gob.mx, equivalent to the U.S. Department of Commerce (SE) can be found at www.economia.gob.mx and equivalent to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (SALUD) can be found at www.salud.gob.mx. These web sites are mentioned for the readers' convenience but USDA does NOT in any way endorse, guarantee the accuracy of, or necessarily concur with, the information contained on the mentioned sites. MX2092 Facilitating Red Meat Trade and Avoiding Costly Delays Page 3
Posted: 27 December 2012

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