Protection of Environment Pushes Trade Requirements

A Lastest News about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in Mexico

Posted on: 30 Dec 2012

An Agreement was published on December 19, 2012, in Mexico’s Federal Register between the SE and SEMARNAT to establish the classification and coding of goods whose import and export are regulated by SEMARNAT.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Voluntary Public - Date: 12/21/2012 GAIN Report Number: MX2095 Mexico Post: Mexico Protection of Environment Pushes New Trade Requirements Report Categories: Policy and Program Announcements Agriculture in the News Agricultural Situation Approved By: Erik W. Hansen Prepared By: Adriana Otero Report Highlights: An agreement was published on December 19 in Mexico’s Federal Register (Diario Oficial) between the Secretary of Economy (SE) and the Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) to establish the classification and coding of goods whose import and export are regulated by SEMARNAT. Some wild animals and plant species, plant products and byproducts, forest products, among others are included in the agreement. Among the requirements that these products have to meet are the submission of CITES certificates and complete compliance with NOM-059- SEMARNAT-2001. General Information: Disclaimer: This summary is based on a cursory review of the subject announcement and therefore should not, under any circumstances, be viewed as a definitive reading of the resolution in question, or of its implications for U.S. agricultural export trade interests. In the event of a discrepancy or discrepancies between this summary and the complete resolution or announcement as published in Spanish, the latter shall prevail. Title of Notice: Agreement establishing the classification and coding of goods whose import and export is regulated by the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources. Type of Resolution: Final Assessment. Publication Date: December 19, 2012 Products Affected: Wildlife and forest species, parts and products. Hazardous waste and hazardous materials. Agency in Charge: Secretariat of Economy (SE) and Secretariat of Environment and natural Resources (SEMARNAT). Background An Agreement was published on December 19, 2012, in Mexico’s Federal Register between the SE and SEMARNAT to establish the classification and coding of goods whose import and export are regulated by SEMARNAT. Some wild animals and plant species, plant products and byproducts, forest products, among others are included in the agreement. This new agreement amends the scope of some of tariff contained in the previous official publication providing legal security to authorities and users. Some wild animals and plant species, products and byproducts of them, forest products and sub-products, among others are included in this agreement. Among the requirements that these products have to meet are the submission of CITES certificates and complete compliance with NOM-059-SEMARNAT-2001. The agreement includes lists of hazardous waste, hazardous materials and hazardous substances as well. All the items on these lists are subject to inspection at points of entry. Importers and traders of products regulated by SEMARNAT must be registered within this agency and confirm the requirements for each particular case. Permits, certificates and authorizations issued by the competent administrative units of SEMARNAT, in the terms provided in this agreement, will include measures and requirements to be met stakeholders. SEMARNAT in coordination with the International Trade Commission, shall review annually the list of goods subject to non-tariff regulation in the terms of this agreement. SEMARNAT regulates the imports of products that could potentially cause harm to the environment. It issues import authorizations for different products through the General Directorate of Wildlife. On June 30, 2007, an agreement was published in the Mexico’s Federal Register establishing the classification and coding of goods whose import and export are regulated by SEMARNAT, which was later amended on August 27, 2010. With the advances in technology and industry and the increase of exchange of goods, changes in consumption patterns and international trade dynamics, members of the World Commerce Organization (which includes Mexico) agreed to the issuance of the "Fifth Amendment to the nomenclature of the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System". Therefore the Federal Executive Decree published in the Mexico’s Federal Register on June 29, 2012, an amendment to the Tariff Law of the General Taxes of Import and Export. For More Information: FAS/Mexico Web Site: We are available at www.mexico-usda.com or visit the FAS headquarters' home page at www.fas.usda.gov for a complete selection of FAS worldwide agricultural reporting. FAS/Mexico YouTube Channel: Catch the latest videos of FAS Mexico at work http://www.youtube.com/user/ATOMexicoCity Useful Mexican Official Web Sites: Mexico's equivalent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (SAGARPA) can be found at www.sagarpa.gob.mx , equivalent to the U.S. Department of Commerce (SE) can be found at www.economia.gob.mx and equivalent to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (SALUD) can be found at www.salud.gob.mx. The information about biotechnology and biosafety in Mexico is compiled by an Interministerial Commission (CIBIOGEM) http://www.cibiogem.gob.mx These web sites are mentioned for the readers' convenience but USDA does NOT in any way endorse, guarantee the accuracy of, or necessarily concur with, the information contained on the mentioned sites.
Posted: 30 December 2012

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