Tree Nuts Annual

An Expert's View about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in Mexico

Posted on: 12 Oct 2011

Pecans are the most significant tree nut crop in Mexico, but other tree nuts fulfill niche markets and are considered a way for producers to diversify income streams.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 9/15/2011 GAIN Report Number: MX1069 Mexico Tree Nuts Annual Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Approved By: Dan Berman Prepared By: Adam Branson and Alice Gibbons Report Highlights: Pecans remain the most significant economic tree nut in Mexico. Marketing Year (MY) 2011/12 (August/July) pecan production is forecast higher as developing plantations should increase the volume of production as trees mature and as the country enters a high-year in the alternate bearing cycle. MY2010/11 pecan production is estimated at 76,627 metric tons (MT). Information on pistachio and macadamia production is included in this report along with marketing information for almonds and walnuts. Commodities: Pecans, Inshell Basis Macadamia, Inshell Basis Pistachios, Inshell Basis Almonds, Shelled Basis Walnuts, Inshell Basis Production: Production The Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fishery, and Food (SAGARPA) Service of Food and Fishery Information (SIAP) publishes information on pecan (nuez), pistachio (pistache), and macadamia (macadamia) tree-nut production only. Pecans are the most significant tree nut crop in Mexico, but other tree nuts fulfill niche markets and are considered a way for producers to diversify income streams. Many of the principal tree-nut production areas are in restricted travel areas and Post personnel have been unable to conduct field observations. Pecans Pecan production in Mexico alternates between high and low production years. MY2010/11 (August/July) is a low year for the nation with production estimated at 76,627 MT. New trees are coming into production and industry source report there have been continued improvements to tree- care inputs: better fertilizer applications, timely pruning, etc. that will continue to strengthen production in future years along with area expansion that is being developed and planned for new groves in key production areas like Chihuahua. However, plant diseases and pests continue to be a problem and hamper production in some areas. MY2011/12 production is forecast higher at 105,000 MT due to the above factors and the return to the high year of the production cycle. Pecans are harvested in Mexico from August through December with the majority of harvest occurring in November. The total area planted to pecan trees is estimated at 88,000 hectares (Ha) for MY2010/11 and the estimate of harvested area is just below 70,000 Ha. The greatest factor for the difference in area is that a significant amount of planting (e.g., 14,000 Ha in Chihuahua) that is still in the early stages of tree growth. The majority of pecan plantations are located in Chihuahua (60 percent), Coahuila (17 percent), and Sonora (10 percent). Sources indicate that about 1,880 Hectares (Ha) of new pecan plantings were added in Chihuahua in 2011. Weather and climate change will determine the success of these plantings as the area has been abnormally hot and dry. Sources report that only farmers who have water wells on their property are planting new trees. Government officials, nevertheless, believe some producers are planting more trees than there is water available. Many farmers report successfully improving their yields and nut quality through changes in cultivation practices and increased input utilization. Traders advise that some organic pecan production exists, but are not able to say whether this trend is increasing nor what volume of production receives MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 2 organic certification. This market differentiation, however, could gain in importance if organically produced pecans receive favorable demand. SAGARPA has tried to establish several agricultural product systems with the objective of integrating marketing channels so that producers achieve better production, lower costs, and higher incomes. Particular objectives of the Pecan Product System are to encourage the integrated development of pecan production regions and to compensate for the purchase of specialized machinery for harvesting as well as for infrastructure improvements. The system allows producers a bigger share of the production and distribution cycle and should lower the costs of production and make production more profitable and attractive. Table 1. Mexico: Pecan Production Area (Ha) and Volume (MT) MY2009/10 - MY2011/12 MY2007/08 MY2008/09 MY2009/10 MY2010/11 MY2011/12 In-Shell Basis Official Official Official Estimate Forecast Area Planted (Ha) 77,582 80,048 84,509 88,055 90,000 Area Harvested (Ha) 57,509 64,903 65,478 69,549 70,000 Production (MT) 79,162 79,770 115,350 76,627 105,000 Yield (MT/Ha) 1.38 1.23 1.76 1.10 1.50 Production Value (1000 Pesos) 2,241,543 2,960,632 3,963,385 4,116,578 NA Source: SAGARPA SIAP Macadamia Production for MY2010/11 is estimated at 2,122 MT. Macadamia is considered an exotic fruit and a non-traditional product that was established in coffee producing areas with the purpose of generating additional income for producers. In the late 1960?s, the Mexican Institute for Coffee launched a diversification program and distributed macadamia trees among growers. In 1971, the Institute imported about 1,000 trees from California that were then distributed in Michoacan, Veracruz, and Chiapas. Macadamia trees developed very fast in Chiapas as 90 percent of the state?s forestry was suitable and possessed adequate climate and altitude for the trees. Organic macadamia is produced in the state of Veracruz. MY2011/12 production is forecast unchanged. Macadamia trees flower in winter and early spring and are harvested during the summer and following winter. Table 2. Mexico: Macadamia Production Area (Ha) and Volume (MT) MY2007/08 - MY2011/12 In-Shell MY2007/08 MY2008/09 MY2009/10 MY2010/11 MY2011/12 Basis Official Official Official Estimate Forecast Area Planted (Ha) 1,518 1,406 1,412 1,292 1,250 Area Harvested (Ha) 1,358 1,295 1,292 1,139 1,140 Production (MT) 2,491 1,379 1,870 2,122 2,122 Yield (MT/Ha) 1.83 1.07 1.45 1.86 1.86 MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 3 Production Value (1000 Pesos) 31,797 20,253 22,059 38,222 NA Source: SAGARPA SIAP Pistachio MY2011/12 production is forecast at 80 MT, but production will depend on weather and climate conditions. MY2010/11 pistachio production is estimated at 71 MT and is at its highest historical level as harvested area continues increasing as new trees enter into production. Two municipalities in Chihuahua account for nearly 100 percent of production, but several other states with planted area are not harvesting, yet. Yields in these two key municipalities have averaged between 500 kilograms to 800 kilograms per hectare over the past two years. Table 2. Mexico: Pistachio Production Area (Ha) and Volume (MT) MY2007/08 - MY2011/12 MY2007/08 MY2008/09 MY2009/10 MY2010/11 MY2011/12 In-Shell Basis Official Official Official Estimate Forecast Area Planted (Ha) 220 140 223 223 223 Area Harvested (Ha) 36 33 122 143 160 Production (MT) 10 21 66 71 80 Yield (MT/Ha) 0.28 0.62 0.54 0.49 0.50 Production Value (1000 Pesos) 373 1,093 4,147 5,951 NA Source: SAGARPA SIAP Walnuts and Almonds There is no official information on Mexican walnut or almond production. Consumption: Pecans Domestic pecan consumption is price sensitive. When prices are low, domestic consumption increases and when prices are high, it decreases. For MY2010/11, consumption was estimated slightly lower than MY2009/10 due to expected higher prices. However, this ultimately depends on the volume of nuts exported. The pecan sector continues looking for new market niches in the confectionary and baking industries. However, domestic confectionery makers, bakeries, and food processors are expected to remain the largest consumers of Mexican pecans. Domestic-origin pecans are sold in wholesale markets. Pecans entering commercial domestic channels are principally from Morelos, Jalisco, Puebla, and the Mexico City Federal District (D.F). According to information from Mexico?s wholesale markets, Wichita cultivar pecans from Durango, Nuevo Leon, and Sonora enter commercial channels throughout the country. Additionally, paper-thin shelled pecans entering domestic channels originate from Colima, Jalisco, Durango, and Sonora. Macadamia MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 4 Macadamia whole nuts are consumed domestically and are marketed as seasoned snacks with salt, hot pepper, sugar, and/or chocolate covering and flavoring. Macadamia pieces are used in ice cream, pastries, and cookies. Pistachios, Walnuts, and Almonds Nearly all consumption of pistachios, walnuts, and almonds is of imported nuts. See the marketing section of this report for additional information. Trade: NOTE: Import and export figures for pecans are based on official Mexican trade data. This information frequently differs from official U.S. trade data. The Mexican Harmonized Tariff System (HTS) number for in-shell pecans is 0802.31.01 and for shelled pecans is 0802.32.01. (Conversion factor: 1 MT shelled pecans = 2 MT in-shell pecans). The United States was the top supplier of tree nuts to Mexico in MY2009/10 and MY2010/11. The United States remains an attractive supplier due to its geographical proximity to processors as well as for its efficient distribution channels for processing and re-export trade to the U.S. and other markets. In-shell and shelled pecan imports and exports occur throughout the year. The greatest import volume of in-shell pecans occurs in March and April whereas the greatest export volumes of in-shell pecans occurs in November and December. The greatest shelled import volume of pecans occurs in the first half of the marketing year. The greatest shelled export volumes in MY2009/10 were in November and May. Table 4. Mexico: In-Shell and Shelled Pecan Trade by Volume (MT) for MY2010/11** In-Shell Pecan Exports To: Volume Pecan In-Shell Imports From: Volume U.S. 16,076 U.S. 10,314 Hong Kong 1,783 Others 0 Others 455 Total 18,314 Total 10,314 Shelled Pecan Exports To: Volume* Shelled Pecan Imports From: Volume* U.S. 35,914 U.S. 3,184 Hong Kong 0 Hong Kong 0 Others 18 Others 0 Total 35,932 Total 3,184 *Volume Converted to In-Shell Basis ** Data through May 2011 MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 5 Table 5. Mexico: In-Shell and Shelled Pecan Trade by Volume (MT) for MY2009/10 In-Shell Pecan Exports To: Volume Pecan In-Shell Imports From: Volume U.S. 33,716 U.S. 15,250 Hong Kong 6,254 Others 0 Others 632 Total 40,603 Total 15,250 Shelled Pecan Exports To: Volume* Shelled Pecan Imports From: Volume* U.S. 75,164 U.S. 5,626 Hong Kong 0 Hong Kong 0 Others 124 Others 0 Total 75,288 Total 5,626 *Volume Converted to In-Shell Basis Table 6. Mexico: In-Shell and Shelled Pecan Trade by Value for MY2010/11** In-Shell Pecan Exports To: Value Pecan In-Shell Imports From: Value U.S. 71,259,798 U.S. 43,932,271 Hong Kong 5,989,205 Others 0 Others 2,165,474 Total 79,414,477 Total 43,932,271 Shelled Pecan Exports To: Value Shelled Pecan Imports From: Value U.S. 138,565,459 U.S. 9,644,222 Hong Kong 0 Hong Kong 0 Others 113,099 Others 3,274 Total 138,678,558 Total 9,647,496 ** Data through May 2011 Table 7. Mexico: In-Shell and Shelled Pecan Trade by Value for MY2009/10 In-Shell Pecan Exports To: Value Pecan In-Shell Imports From: Value U.S. 85,006,012 U.S. 43,200,762 Hong Kong 21,053,223 Others 0 Others 2,125,224 Total 108,184,459 Total 43,200,762 Shelled Pecan Exports To: Value Shelled Pecan Imports From: Value U.S. 109,605,817 U.S. 8,936,851 Hong Kong 0 Hong Kong 0 Others 612,973 Others 0 Total 110,218,790 Total 8,936,851 Macadamia There is no significant import volume or value of Macadamia nut into Mexico for the past two marketing years; however, Guatemala has recently begun exporting small volumes to Mexico. MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 6 Mexico?s export volume and value of Macadamia nut remains small, as well. Through the first 10 months of MY2010/11, Colombia has been the greatest supplier of Macadamias followed by the United States. Pistachios There is no significant export volume of pistachios. Trade volumes from MY2009/10 to MY2010/11 have decreased considerably even though average prices (based on trade data) are lower than a year ago. The data in the tables below is for HTS 08025011. Table 8. Mexico: Pistachio Imports by Volume (MT) and Value ($) for MY2010/11** Pistachio Imports From: Volume Value United States 665 3,961,093 Iran 312 1,223,180 Total 977 5,184,273 ** MY through May 2011 Table 9. Mexico: Pistachio Imports by Volume (MT) and Value ($) for MY2009/10 Pistachio Imports From: Volume Value United States 2,395 15,484,539 Iran 174 487,000 Total 2,569 15,971,539 SOURCE: http://www.economia- snci.gob.mx:8080/siaviWeb/fraccionAction.do?tigie=08025001&paper=cm1imp Almonds The United States is the principal supplier of in-shell and shelled almonds to Mexico. Official Mexican trade data shows that very few almonds are exported. Additionally, in-shell almond volumes are minimal. Shelled almond imports occur throughout the year and are relatively stable. The greatest volume of imports typically occurs in November and December. Policy: Import tariffs implemented by the Mexican Secretariat of Economy (SE) resulting from the trucking dispute remain in effect for a variety of tree nuts from the United States. However, on July 7, 2011, SE reduced the tariff from 20 percent to the current rate of 10 percent on pistachios, almonds, and other prepared nuts. The tariffs should fall to zero when the entire trucking agreement between the United States and Mexico is implemented fully. Despite the tariffs, U.S. pistachios hold the majority market share in Mexico. The GOM published its quality standards for fresh-shelled pecans on June 2, 2011, on the SE website. The voluntary measures (Norma Mexicana NMX-FF-093-SCFI) provide for sampling and classifying of pecans by size, residues, and other hygienic metrics. Prices: An August 31, 2011, report citing information from the Pecan Product System reveals that new crop, in- shell, fresh pecans with 25 percent humidity were selling for a minimum price of 20 to 30 pesos per kilogram (kg). The SE National Service of Market Information (SNIIM) provides wholesale market MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 7 prices for pecans (first-grade, paper-shell, and Wichita cultivar) and pistachios. The wholesale market price series covers whole, shelled, cracked, as well as halved pecans. The three most active wholesale markets covering Wichita cultivar pecans are in Hermosillo, Sonora; San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon; and, Durango, Durango. At the beginning of MY2010/11, Wichita pecans were sold at the Hermosillo market for 55 pesos/kg before peaking at 80 pesos/kg in early March and falling back to 55 pesos/kg by early July. Shelled Wichita pecans were sold at a significant premium in Sonora since late February of MY2010/11 and remain around 190 pesos/kg. Paper-thin shell pecans are marketed in a number of other wholesale markets around the country, including; Colima, Colima; Durango, Durango; and, Morelia, Michoacan. Prices in Colima have averaged about 70 pesos/kg throughout the marketing year whereas prices in Durango have been lower and closer to 60 pesos/kg for the first part of the marketing year before reaching and remaining at 70 pesos/kg since the winter holidays. Wholesale market prices for paper-thin shell pecans in Sonora started out the marketing year at 70 pesos/kg and rose slowly throughout the year and are now around 95 pesos/kg. Prices for Jalisco-origin pistachios remain stable at the Nayarit wholesale market and have been around 150 pesos/kg throughout MY2010/11. Table 10. Mexico: Monthly Exchange Rate Averages for 2008-2011 Pesos per U.S. $1.00 2008 2009 2010 2011 January 10.91 13.15 12.80 12.13 February 10.77 14.55 12.95 12.06 March 10.74 14.71 12.59 12.00 April 10.52 13.41 12.23 11.73 May 10.44 13.19 12.71 11.64 June 10.33 13.47 12.72 11.80 July 10.24 13.36 12.65 11.67 August 10.10 13.00 13.15 12.22 September 10.61 13.41 12.84 October 12.56 13.24 12.44 November 12.31 13.12 12.33 December 13.40 12.85 12.39 Annual Avg. 11.14 12.33 12.65 11.86 Source: Mexican Federal Register Note: Monthly rates are averages of daily exchange rates from the Banco de Mexico. Marketing: Pecans Pecans are one of the most popular tree nuts consumed in Mexico. Pecans are perceived as a nutritional food, especially for their antioxidant content and are recommended by the medical community for supporting a healthy heart. Pecans are especially popular in the market because they are one of the easiest tree nuts to shell and are an accessible source of nutrition. Macadamia Macadamia is an exotic and largely unknown tree nut and consumption may benefit from greater advertising and marketing. Consumers with higher purchasing power are seen as the best customers of MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 8 Macadamia nuts. Macadamia is considered a seasonal product and is marketed locally. There are few brands distributing Macadamia nuts in supermarkets. Pistachios Due to the relatively high price of pistachios, they remain a niche product that predominantly reaches higher income consumers. The retail sector is responsible for over 70 percent of pistachio sales. The Christmas season is the highest consumption period for these tree nuts. Pistachios are most commonly consumed as a roasted snack but they are also very popular in the food processing industry, primarily in ice cream production. Food Processors with the highest demand for pistachios in Mexico are Santa Clara, Helados Bing, Helados Holanda, and Dolphy for ice cream, and Mr. Pistachio and Verde Valle for snacks. The outlook for future growth of the pistachio market in Mexico remains optimistic given the health benefits of pistachios, like other nuts, and the trend toward healthier lifestyles in Mexico. Pistachios are perceived in Mexico as the ?skinny nut? given their relatively low fat content compared to other nuts; they have 52 percent while hazelnuts have 61 percent and pecans are 72 percent fat. Half the fat in pistachios comes from ?heart-healthy? monounsaturated fat. Also, pistachios are one of the only snack nuts commonly sold in-shell which helps moderate consumption and helps prevent overeating. Walnuts Walnuts compete directly with other popular tree nuts such as cashews (also known as nuez de la India in Mexico) and almonds. These other tree nuts are perceived in Mexico as having more health benefits than walnuts. Nonetheless, walnuts? long shelf life without the loss of quality adds to its perception as a high-value product. The sector with the greatest demand for walnuts is foodservice in Mexico followed by the food processing industry. Walnuts continue to be used as a ?value-added? ingredient in snack bars, cereals, and confectionary products. Some of the Mexican food processors with the highest consumption of walnuts are: Quaker Oats (cereal, cookies), Bimbo and Marinela (baked goods), Ricolino and Turin (chocolate and confectionary), and Blue Diamond (snacks). Mexican consumers have a very high perception of imported walnuts from the United States. The United States holds the entire market share of imported walnuts in Mexico. With the economic downturn in 2009 in Mexico, however, imported walnut volumes fell significantly because of their high price resulting from a disadvantageous exchange rate of the Mexican peso to the U.S. dollar. However, Mexico presents positive growth opportunities for U.S. origin walnuts given: 1) they are higher quality than domestically-produced walnuts; 2) they are perceived as a healthy nutrient source and will likely become more demanded as Mexico focuses on a healthier lifestyle; and 3) the Mexican food processing industry continues to demand higher quality walnuts from suppliers with a solid distribution network. Almonds MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 9 Almonds, along with pecans are among the most consumed tree nuts in Mexico. Increased demand for almonds in Mexico is expected as the trend of a healthier lifestyle and diet continues. Almonds are recognized as supporting heart health because they reduce ?bad? cholesterol and provide a variety of nutrients that care for the heart such as iron, potassium, magnesium, monounsaturated fat and protein. The fat and protein of almonds also makes consumer feel satisfied quicker and therefore aids in preventing overeating. Almonds are known as a rich source of energy and provide a high nutritional content when consumed in raw form. As a result, almonds are highly marketed in Mexico as the healthy snack alternative to popcorn or potato chips. In addition to snacks, almonds are used in the bakery, confectionary, and food processing industries, as well as in cosmetics and toiletries (to produce oils and creams). Mexican Importers/Distributors of Tree Nuts A number of trade facilitation resources exist for U.S. tree nut producers and exporters. These include the Mexican industry organizations listed below. In addition, U.S. suppliers interested in making contact with Mexican tree nut buyers are encouraged to contact the Agricultural Trade Office. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service, Agricultural Trade Office Liverpool No. 31 Mexico, D.F., 06000 Phone (5255) 5140-2614, 5140-2671; Fax (5255) 5535-8557 National Association of Manufacturers of Chocolates, Candy, and Similars (ASOCIACION NACIONAL DE FABRICANTES DE CHOCOLATES, DULCES Y SIMILARES, A.C.) Manuel Maria Contreras No. 133-301, Col. Cuauhtemoc Mexico, D.F., 06500 Phone (5255) 5546-1259, 5546-0974; Fax (5255) 5592-2497 National Chamber of the Baking and Confectionary Industry (CAMARA NACIONAL DE INDUSTRIA PANIFICADORA Y SIMILARES (CANAINPA)) Dr. Liceaga No. 96, Col. Doctores Mexico, D.F., 06720 Phone (5255) 5578-9277, 5578-9288; Fax (5255) 5761-8924 National Chamber of the Transformation Industry (CAMARA NACIONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA DE TRANSFORMACION (CANACINTRA)) San Antonio No. 256, Col. Ampliacion Napoles Mexico, D.F., 03849 Phone (5255) 5563-3400, 5563-3000; Fax (5255) 5598-9467 National Association of Supermarkets and Department Stores (ASOCIACION NACIONAL DE TIENDAS DE AUTOSERVICIO Y DEPARTAMENTALES, A.C.) MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 10 Av. Horacio 1855, 6th Floor, Col. Chapultepec Morales Mexico, D.F., 11570 Phone (5255) 5580-1772; Fax (5255) 5395-2610 Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Table 11. Mexico: 2010 Pecan Production by State Planted Area Harvested Area Production Yield Production Value State (Ha) (Ha) (Ton) (Ton/Ha) 1,000 Pesos Aguascalientes 177 177 342 1.93 11,758 Baja California 20 18 10 0.56 495 Chihuahua 53,029 39,421 39,765 1.01 2,680,280 Coahuila 15,323 12,911 10,248 0.79 455,251 D.F. 3 3 14 4.27 332 Durango 4,894 4,070 3,652 0.90 178,812 Guanajuato 86 86 93 1.08 2,565 Hidalgo 1,025 739 2,389 3.23 38,120 Jalisco 220 211 767 3.64 39,086 Mexico 32 32 144 4.52 2,695 Morelos 21 21 72 3.45 349 Nuevo Leon 3,904 3,807 1,679 0.44 38,828 Oaxaca 243 230 415 1.80 5,479 Queretaro 133 133 233 1.75 2,840 San Luis Potosi 122 121 466 3.85 9,980 Sonora 8,691 7,438 16,103 2.16 644,121 Tamaulipas 90 90 166 1.85 3,726 Zacatecas 43 43 70 1.62 1,861 Nationwide 88,055 69,549 76,627 1.10 4,116,578 Source: SAGARPA SIAP Table 12. Mexico. 2009 Pecan Production by State Planted Area Harvested Area Production Yield Production Value State (Ha) (Ha) (Ton) (Ton/Ha) 1,000 Pesos MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 11 Aguascalientes 154 154 264 1.71 8,562 Baja California 20 18 7 0.37 288 Chihuahua 51,389 38,830 74,226 1.91 2,769,212 Coahuila 14,361 12,719 19,433 1.53 582,183 D.F. 3 3 11 3.35 255 Durango 4,653 3,946 6,082 1.54 171,842 Guanajuato 86 86 78 0.9 2,419 Hidalgo 1,025 739 2,622 3.55 40,374 Jalisco 205 201 725 3.6 35,405 Mexico 31 30 109 3.63 2,062 Morelos 21 21 81 3.83 379 Nuevo Leon 3,890 3,890 2,489 0.64 57,125 Oaxaca 252 231 417 1.81 5,497 Puebla 43 43 108 2.5 1,119 Queretaro 147 147 279 1.9 3,212 San Luis Potosi 122 121 392 3.24 7,470 Sonora 7,968 4,200 7,888 1.88 271,380 Tamaulipas 99 60 74 1.24 2,678 Zacatecas 41 41 68 1.68 1,924 Nationwide 84,509 65,478 115,350 1.76 3,963,385 Source: SAGARPA SIAP Table 13. Mexico: 2010 Macadamia Production by Municipality Planted Harvested ction State Municipality Ar tion Yie Produ ld ea Ar Producea Va lue (Ha) (Ha) (Ton) (Ton/Ha) (1000 Pesos) BCS Paz La 1 0 0 0.00 0 MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 12 CHIA Chilon 113 113 17 0.15 339 CHIA Ocosingo 319 200 90 0.45 3,150 CHIA Tila 23 23 3 0.15 69 CHIA Tumbala 49 49 7 0.15 147 CHIA Yajalon 130 130 20 0.15 390 JAL Villa Purificacion 7 0 0 0.00 0 MEX Zumpahuacan 40 40 48 1.20 1,416 MICH Tinguindin 18 0 0 0.00 0 MICH Tuxpan 1 1 4 4.00 19 MICH Uruapan 41 34 148 4.34 2,018 MICH Ziracuaretiro 2 1 4 3.50 49 PUE Huauchinango 55 55 165 3.00 1,650 PUE Tlapacoya 278 278 834 3.00 8,340 PUE Xicotepec 60 60 180 3.00 1,800 VER Coatepec 90 90 360 4.00 11,160 Cosautlan de VER Carvajal 10 10 35 3.53 1,130 VER Teocelo 15 15 53 3.50 1,628 VER Tlalnelhuayocan 30 30 120 3.99 3,832 VER Xalapa 10 10 35 3.50 1,085 Nationwide 1,292 1,139 2,122 1.86 38,222 Source: SAGARPA SIAP Table 14. Mexico: 2009 Macadamia Production by Municipality Planted Harvested State Municipality Area Ar Production Yie Production ld ea Value (Ha) (Ha) (Ton) (Ton/Ha) (1000 Pesos) BCS Paz La 1 0 0 0.00 0 MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 13 CHIA Chilon 113 113 18 0.16 362 CHIA Ocosingo 319 210 59 0.28 2,352 CHIA Tila 23 23 4 0.17 78 CHIA Tumbala 49 49 7 0.14 137 CHIA Yajalon 130 130 21 0.16 416 JAL Villa Purificacion 7 0 0 0.00 0 MEX Zumpahuacan 40 40 80 2.00 2,444 MICH Uruapan 20 18 82 4.56 1,108 MICH Ziracuaretiro 2 1 4 4.00 58 MICH Tinguindin 18 18 36 2.00 396 MICH Tuxpan 1 1 4 4.20 19 PUE Huauchinango 55 55 110 2.00 880 PUE Tlapacoya 278 278 832 2.99 6,656 PUE Xicotepec 60 60 120 2.00 960 PUE Zihuateutla 230 230 250 1.09 2,000 VER Coatepec 15 15 48 3.20 830 Cosautlan de VER Caravajal 10 10 35 3.50 592 VER Tlalnelhuayocan 24 24 96 4.00 1,666 VER Xalapa 17 17 65 3.80 1,105 Nationwide 1,412 1,292 1,870 1.45 22,059 Source: SAGARPA SIAP Table 15. Mexico: 2010 Pistachio Production by Municipality Planted Harvested Production State Municipality Ar ion Yield ea A Productrea Va lue (Ha) (Ha) (Ton) (Ton/Ha) (1000 Pesos) BC Ensenada 2 0 0 0.00 0 MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 14 BCS Paz La 1 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Ahumada 57 57 29 0.50 2,565 CHIH Aldama 10 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Ascencion 19 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Buenaventura 3 3 2 0.50 135 CHIH Camargo 2 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Casas Grandes 1 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Chihuahua 9 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Coyame 4 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Delicias 22 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Juarez 7 7 2 0.35 196 Praxedis G. CH IH Guerrero 76 76 38 0.50 3,045 Valle de CH IH Zaragoza 10 0 0 0.43 10 Nationwide 223 143 71 0.49 5,951 Source: SAGARPA SIAP Table 16. Mexico: 2009 Pistachio Production by Municipality Planted Harvested Production Ar ld ea Ar Production Yieea Value State Municipality (Ha) (Ha) (Ton) (Ton/Ha) (1000 Pesos) BC Ensenada 2 0 0 0.00 0 BCS Paz La 1 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Coyame 5 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Ascencion 19 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Casas Grandes 1 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Janos 2 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Aldama 10 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Chihuahua 9 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Camargo 2 0 0 0.00 0 CHIH Delicias 22 22 18 0.80 686 CHIH Ahumada 57 21 13 0.60 630 CHIH Buenaventura 5 3 1 0.20 30 CHIH Valle de Zaragoza 12 0 0 0.00 0 Praxedis G. CHIH Guerrero 76 76 35 0.46 2,801 Nationwide 223 122 66 0.54 4,147 Source: SAGARPA SIAP Author Defined: FAS/Mexico Web Site: We are available at www.mexico-usda.com or visit the FAS headquarters' home page at www.fas.usda.gov for a complete selection of FAS worldwide agricultural reporting. MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 15 FAS/Mexico YouTube Channel: Catch the latest videos of FAS Mexico at work http://www.youtube.com/user/ATOMexicoCity Other Relevant Reports Submitted by FAS/Mexico: Report Num Subject Date Submitted ber MX1055 Mexico Reduces Trucking Retaliation Against Agricultural Products 07/14/2011 MX1042 Market Concentration in Selected Agricultural and Food Subsectors 05/21/2011 MX0323 2010 Food Processing Sector Report 03/21/2011 MX0082 Mexico Repeals 2 Coconut Palm NOMS in an Effort to Streamline Regs 11/09/2010 MX0063 2010 Tree Nuts Annual: Pecan and Macadamia Situation 09/14/2010 Useful Mexican Web Sites: Mexico's equivalent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (SAGARPA) can be found at www.sagarpa.gob.mx , equivalent to the U.S. Department of Commerce (SE) can be found at www.economia.gob.mx and equivalent to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (SALUD) can be found at www.salud.gob.mx. These web sites are mentioned for the readers' convenience but USDA does NOT in any way endorse, guarantee the accuracy of, or necessarily concur with, the information contained on the mentioned sites. MX1069 Pecan, Macadamia, Pistachio, Walnut and Almond Situation Page 16
Posted: 12 October 2011

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