Dairy and Products Semi-annual

An Expert's View about Dairy Products in Mexico

Posted on: 20 May 2012

Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 5/14/2012 GAIN Report Number: MX2028 Mexico Dairy and Products Semi-annual Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Approved By: Daniel K. Berman Prepared By: Gabriel Hernandez and Adam Branson Report Highlights: Post Mexico City has lowered its marketing year (MY) 2012 forecast and MY2011 estimate for Mexican dairy production. Better genetics and management are helping improve yields over last year’s levels in spite of the record drought which is forcing consolidation and overall herd reductions. Production does not meet demand and Mexico will continue importing dairy products, principally from the United States. In 2011, Mexico became the first $1 billion market for U.S. dairy and related products. Commodities: Dairy, Milk, Fluid Production: The Post MY2012 (January to December) fluid milk production forecast was revised slightly downward to 10.967 million metric tons (MMT) from USDA’s Official forecast of 11.140 MMT as harsh conditions — an exceptional long-term drought — continue affecting the dairy sector, despite government financial support for small and medium-sized producers. Private sources indicate that the total number of milk producers has gone from 200,000 in 2008 to 160,000 today due to higher production costs. Recent analysis indicates that 70 percent of the milk production cost is linked to animal feed. An additional and important factor driving down the number of producers is the perceived low domestic milk price. The Post fluid milk production estimate for MY2011 is revised downward slightly from the USDA estimate to reflect official data from Mexico’s Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fishery and Food (SAGARPA). As previously reported, this decrease is due to increased production costs and adverse weather conditions. Milk production costs increased due to high feed and energy prices. Also, the lack of moisture across almost all of Mexico through MY2011 caused a reduction in forage supplies thereby constraining production among small and medium-sized producers. The Post fluid milk production estimate for MY2010 remains unchanged from the USDA/Official estimate. Starting in late MY2011 and during the first quarter of MY2012, small and medium-sized producers have been sending milking cows, which are at the end of their productive cycle, to slaughter as opposed to rendering facilities. Highly productive cows are being sold to larger vertically integrated farms; most of these farms are associated with large processing companies. Although small and medium-sized producers are exiting the industry or reducing herd sizes, more productive milk cows at large, vertically integrated farms will support MY2012 production at levels similar to MY2011 production. The sustained milk production level is due to better herd genetics and improved production practices. There is no change to the number of milk cows for MY2010 from USDA’s estimate. The Post MY2011 estimate of milk cows was revised slightly lower from the USDA estimate due to the increased cost of animal feed and slower than anticipated economic recovery which pushed producers to decrease herd size. The number of milk cows for MY2012 is forecast lower than the USDA forecast, as well. Table 1. Mexico: Total fluid milk production by State, calendar year 2006-2011 and January-March 2012, in thousand liters. 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011* 2012** AGUASCALIENTES 383,658 375,401 370,399 367,171 369,253 372,252 369,000 MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 2 BAJA CALIFORNIA 166,868 207,915 193,422 179,795 174,027 181,190 163,886 BAJA CALIFORNIA 44,634 43,150 46,451 46,104 44,323 41,144 42,193 SUR CAMPECHE 34,241 35,517 35,029 36,271 36,146 36,364 37,815 COAHUILA 1,247,356 1,286,281 1,363,762 1,282,618 1,243,058 1,275,065 1,284,985 COLIMA 39,039 36,146 36,525 32,349 34,883 36,059 34,095 CHIAPAS 327,138 353,085 372,249 366,393 385,455 402,583 396,876 CHIHUAHUA 808,641 817,919 926,222 923,053 934,928 930,020 913,963 DISTRITO FEDERAL 13,138 10,058 12,322 13,652 13,643 13,784 13,802 DURANGO 1,014,535 1,019,227 1,036,581 959,716 1,001,137 999,729 1,042,008 GUANAJUATO 673,007 674,660 684,202 761,759 775,108 793,926 771,000 GUERRERO 81,868 82,001 81,552 84,157 86,892 83,764 86,422 HIDALGO 445,465 460,773 452,977 439,361 419,273 398,540 404,350 JALISCO 1,697,486 1,793,579 1,855,362 1,900,343 1,960,999 1,994,577 2,010,358 MEXICO 476,231 478,211 464,573 464,704 478,261 481,936 483,379 MICHOACAN 328,404 328,185 329,079 331,909 331,038 334,934 341,134 MORELOS 18,551 21,105 18,809 20,901 21,784 20,890 20,850 NAYARIT 64,506 64,536 61,974 60,130 60,742 59,601 60,130 NUEVO LEON 39,473 41,432 39,909 40,586 40,397 37,790 38,751 OAXACA 140,720 142,795 145,213 146,406 147,080 147,933 154,324 PUEBLA 367,963 384,707 384,285 395,211 403,100 405,338 409,003 QUERETARO 198,488 200,835 195,791 192,435 192,422 195,147 229,761 QUINTANA ROO 5,250 5,642 5,623 5,829 5,921 5,562 6,246 SAN LUIS POTOSI 147,591 140,630 141,828 132,285 130,899 128,772 128,246 SINALOA 82,067 88,633 93,779 95,943 102,081 107,909 107,296 SONORA 142,052 137,780 134,921 126,496 129,355 112,055 130,510 TABASCO 115,617 110,603 110,694 111,533 111,416 105,362 106,970 TAMAULIPAS 31,520 29,224 30,209 32,326 30,242 29,666 28,513 TLAXCALA 99,158 110,258 110,924 120,356 115,223 106,574 106,801 VERACRUZ 681,809 692,754 697,288 708,230 722,465 726,409 719,482 YUCATAN 6,769 5,557 5,608 4,366 3,441 3,146 3,026 ZACATECAS 165,309 167,383 163,293 166,655 171,703 174,618 168,111 NAC 982 10,498,994 10,549,038 10,676,693 10,742,633 10,813,286 IONAL 10,088,551 10,345, Lagunera Area /1 2,122,092 2,205,498 2,255,272 2,090,707 2,092,807 2,117,562 2,197,301 Source: SIAP-SAGARPA: The Agro-food and Fishery Information Service, Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fishery and Food (SAGARPA) *SAGARPA's definitive figures for 2011 **SAGARPA'S preliminary figures for 2012 Consumption: The Post MY2012, total fluid milk consumption forecast (domestic and factory use) was revised downward to 10.996 MMT in comparison to the USDA forecast of 11.169 MMT. The Post MY2011 total fluid milk consumption was revised downward slightly from the USDA estimate due to official data. There is no change to the MY2010 consumption estimate. MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 3 It is important to note the trade-offs between fluid domestic consumption and factory use. Fluid domestic consumption decreased noticeably from USDA forecasts and estimates as consumers are switching to other prepared and processed dairy products such as yogurts and other preparations that offer attractive prices, a full range of flavors, and a longer shelf life. Private sources estimate that financial constraints among the low to middle income population sectors and the slowdown in population growth have contributed to the drop in fluid milk consumption. Industry sources report that per capita dairy product (milk, cheese, yogurt, etc.) consumption is estimated at 140 kilograms (63.5 pounds). Also, the same sources report that Mexico shows a per capita consumption of 139.5 liters per year of fluid milk or 385 milliliters per day which is far below the WHO recommendations of at least 500 milliliters per day. Consumption levels are correlated with the continued recovery of consumer purchasing power as well as changing demographics (e.g., aging of the population). The trend is for the increased consumption of added value dairy products such as yoghurts, cheeses as well as of ultra high temperature (UHT) milk. Dairy products such as lactose free, light, low-fat and flavored milk, formulas, etc., are gaining domestic market share and demanding more fluid milk for processing and production. Prices: On October 9, 2011, LICONSA [1] announced a 0.60 pesos (U.S. $0.04) per liter increase to the price paid to producers in order to benefit small and medium-sized producers for a final price of 5.60 pesos (USD $0.42) per liter. On the consumer price side, LICONSA announced that the price of milk distributed to low-income households was increased 0.50 pesos (U.S. $0.03) per liter for a final price of 4.50 (USD $0.33). LICONSA’s price paid to dairy producers is used as a domestic reference price as many small and medium producers supply milk to LICONSA. During President Calderon’s administration LICONSA has purchased more than 3.0 billion liters of milk from Mexican milk producers. This figure represents 70 percent of the amount sold to the low income level population. The remaining 30 percent is imported to be reconstituted or used in the production of added-value products. [1] Liconsa, S. A. de C.V. is “a state-owned company devoted to the industrialization and distribution of high-quality milk at a reasonable price, whose main purpose is supporting the nutritional resources of disadvantaged families to contribute to human capital development.” Trade: Mexico remains a milk production deficit nation and will continue to be an attractive market for U.S. dairy and dairy product exporters. As such, the United States will continue to be the primary supplier of fluid milk to Mexico. The Post fluid milk import forecast for MY2012 remains unchanged from the USDA forecast at 39,000 MT. The Post MY2011 fluid milk import estimate is revised downward from the USDA/Official MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 4 estimate due to higher prices resulting from currency exchange rates and the increase in consumption of other processed dairy products. The Post MY2010 fluid milk import estimate remains unchanged from the USDA estimate. The Post MY2012 fluid milk export forecast remains unchanged from the USDA forecast at 10,000 MT. This is due to the relatively attractive price of Mexican fluid milk and the perceived cumbersome registration process for new companies to be certified as eligible to export. Figures for MY2011 and MY2010 remain unchanged and reflect official data. Stocks: No stocks are held due to the lack of refrigeration storage space among producers and end-users. As such, end-users utilize just-in-time delivery for those products which enter value-added processes. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Dairy, Milk, Fluid 2010 2011 2012 Mexico Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 2011 2012 1000 MT USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Cows In Milk (heads) 6,480 6,480 6,500 6,400 6,500 6,400 Cows Milk Production 11,033 11,033 10,878 10,743 10,975 10,813 Other Milk Production 168 168 165 162 165 154 Total Production 11,201 11,201 11,043 10,905 11,140 10,967 Other Imports 41 41 39 38 39 39 Total Imports 41 41 39 38 39 39 Total Supply 11,242 11,242 11,082 10,943 11,179 11,006 Other Exports 9 9 10 10 10 10 Total Exports 9 9 10 10 10 10 Fluid Use Dom. Consum. 5,167 5,167 4,672 4,000 4,669 4,050 Factory Use Consum. 6,066 6,066 6,400 6,933 6,500 6,946 Feed Use Dom. Consum. 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dom. Consumption 11,233 11,233 11,072 10,933 11,169 10,996 Total Distribution 11,242 11,242 11,082 10,943 11,179 11,006 Commodities: Dairy, Cheese Production: The Post MY2012 total cheese production forecast remains unchanged from the USDA forecast even though there is a slight decrease in fluid milk production. The Post MY2011 estimate was revised upward slightly to 270,000 MT from the USDA estimate to reflect available recent private data. The MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 5 production increase reflects the trend of consumers switching to other dairy products prepared by the processing industry such as cheeses and the increased availability of imported and domestic raw materials for cheese production. The Post estimate for MY2010 cheese production remains unchanged at 264,000 MT. Consumption: The Post MY2012 total cheese consumption forecast shows marginal increases over the USDA forecast due to greater demand from low and lower-middle income consumers of fresh cheese. Additionally, the consumption of aged cheese among high-middle and high-income consumers is expected to be greater than the USDA estimate for MY2011. This reflects the most recent industry data that indicates a change in consumption patterns in favor of prepared breakfast and lunch foods that contain some cheese component. The Post MY2010 consumption estimate is unchanged from the USDA estimate. Trade: As previously reported, on October 21, 2011, Mexico lifted retaliatory duties applied to four HTS codes for cheese (see 2010 GAIN report MX1076 Mexico Eliminates Trucking Retaliation Tariffs). Although the retaliatory tariff duties made cheeses from the four HTS codes more expensive, middle and high- income consumers continued demanding them during MY2011. Private sources from the dairy sector indicate that during 2011, 620,000 MT of dairy products entered Mexico. Sources estimate that 14 percent of this volume included specialty cheeses. The Post MY2012 import forecast remains unchanged from the USDA forecast. The year over year increase is spurred by Mexico’s economic recovery. The Post MY2011 import estimate is a slight increase from USDA’s estimate. The Post import estimate for MY2010 remains unchanged from the USDA/Official estimate. Not a significant exporter, the Post MY2012 cheese export forecast is revised lower than the USDA forecast. The Post MY2011 export estimate also was revised lower than the USDA estimate due to low dairy product prices in the international market which did not draw significant demand response from Mexico. The MY2011 estimate reflects official data, as well. The Post export estimate for MY2010 remains unchanged from the USDA estimate. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Dairy, Cheese Me 2010 2011 2012 xico Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 2011 2012 1000 MT USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 Production 264 264 267 270 270 270 Other Imports 80 80 75 78 85 85 Total Imports 80 80 75 78 85 85 Total Supply 344 344 342 348 355 355 MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 6 Other Exports 6 6 7 4 7 5 Total Exports 6 6 7 4 7 5 Human Dom. Consumption 338 338 335 344 348 350 Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dom. Consumption 338 338 335 344 348 350 Total Use 344 344 342 348 355 355 Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 344 344 342 348 355 355 Commodities: Dairy, Butter Production: The Post MY2012 butter production forecast is maintained at 185,000 MT. This forecast is unchanged from the USDA forecast due to slightly lower fluid milk production. The Post MY2011 estimate for butter production remains unchanged since, historically, the production stems from the availability of fluid milk as well as improved processor profits resulting from higher international butterfat prices. Production for MY2010 remains unchanged from the USDA estimate. Consumption: The Post MY2012 butter and butterfat consumption forecast is a 2.3 percent increase from the USDA forecast as use by the bakery and confectionary sectors is expected to be stronger than previously anticipated. During MY2011, the baking, confectionary and food processing industries depended on domestic production, but the new demand will likely be met with imports. The Post estimate for MY2010 remains unchanged from the USDA estimate. Trade: The Post MY2012 import forecast is raised to 35,000 MT from the USDA forecast of 30,000 MT due to a combination of limited domestic production and sustained demand from the bakery and confectionary sectors. The Post MY2011 estimate is revised downward the USDA estimate to reflect official data and is explained by the reduced butterfat import needs of the baking and confectionary sector as these sectors substituted for domestic raw materials. The Post MY2010 import estimate remains unchanged from the USDA estimate. New Zealand will continue to be the principal supplier of butterfat to Mexico for MY2012. The United States, however, is forecast to maintain market share. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Dairy, Butter Me 2010 2011 2012 xico Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 2011 2012 1000 MT USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 7 Production 182 182 187 187 185 185 Other Imports 49 49 38 36 30 35 Total Imports 49 49 38 36 30 35 Total Supply 231 231 225 223 215 220 Other Exports 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Exports 0 0 0 0 0 0 Domestic Consumption 231 231 225 223 215 220 Total Use 231 231 225 223 215 220 Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 231 231 225 223 215 220 Commodities: Dairy, Milk, Nonfat Dry Production: The Post MY2012 production forecast for Non-fat Dry Milk (NFDM) is unchanged from the USDA forecast due to lower fluid milk production. The Post production estimate for MY2011 and MY2010 were kept unchanged, as well. As previously reported, NFDM is more expensive than whole milk powder (WMP) and is produced, in more substantial volumes, only when there is seasonal overproduction of fluid milk. Sources have reported that Mexico’s milk powder production may be able to marginally increase once a new plant in the state of Jalisco is fully operational and capable of managing seasonal surpluses that occur during rainy seasons. (See Dry Whole Milk Powder Production section, below, for additional information). Consumption: The Post NFDM MY2012 consumption forecast of 203,000 MT is higher than the USDA forecast of 183,000 MT due to the sustained demand from the industry for production of added-value products. In light of the reduced availability of fluid milk, imports will help meet the sustained demand. The Post consumption estimate for MY2011 is revised upwards to 207,000 MT from the USDA estimate of 193,000 MT as consumer’s preferences for added-value products is growing. The Post consumption estimate for MY2010 is unchanged from the USDA estimate. Sources report that the principal consumers of NFDM are dairy processors who reconstitute the material and sell it as pasteurized or Ultra-high-temperature (UHT) milk. Some, as well, sell NFDM to the confectionary industry. Trade: The Post MY2012 import forecast for NFDM has been revised upward from the USDA forecast as domestic production is not sufficient to meet domestic demand. The Post import estimate for MY2011 was revised upward to reflect official data. The MY2010 estimate is unchanged from the USDA estimate. MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 8 As previously reported, during December 2010, the Secretariat of Economy (SE) announced TRQs for milk powder (and dairy blends) for 2011. (See 2010 GAIN reports MX0095 & MX0096). It is expected that 70 percent of NFDM imports will be rehydrated into fluid milk, UHT milk, and other added-value products such as chesses, yogurts, and ice cream formulations. The remaining 30 percent is used by the bakery sector. Sources report that these industries prefer NFDM as it is easier to use in the preparation of a number of products. Stocks: LICONSA used to be the largest owner of milk powder stocks. Due to industry pressure, however, LICONSA switched to purchasing domestic fluid milk and has reduced its consumption of NFDM and its need to maintain stocks. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Dairy, Milk, Nonfat Dry Me 2010 2011 2012 xico Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 2011 2012 1000 MT USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 Production 13 13 13 13 13 13 Other Imports 155 155 180 194 170 190 Total Imports 155 155 180 194 170 190 Total Supply 168 168 193 207 183 203 Other Exports 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Exports 0 0 0 0 0 0 Human Dom. Consumption 168 168 193 207 183 203 Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dom. Consumption 168 168 193 207 183 203 Total Use 168 168 193 207 183 203 Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 168 168 193 207 183 203 Commodities: Dairy, Dry Whole Milk Powder Production: The Post MY2012 dry whole milk powder (WMP) production forecast is unchanged from the USDA forecast and remains the same as the MY2011 estimate. This is due to reduced fluid milk availability. The Post estimate for MY2011 and MY2010 total dry WMP production figures are unchanged from the USDA estimates. As previously reported, LICONSA continues purchasing domestic fluid milk, thus, MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 9 lowering demand for dry WMP production. As previously stated, the production of WMP depends on the availability of fluid milk, especially, the seasonal surplus of fluid milk. Consumption: Dry WMP consumption for MY2012 is unchanged from the USDA forecast as consumer purchasing power recovery is allowing middle and high-income consumers to buy processed and added-values dairy products instead of products with WPM. The Post MY2011 estimate was revised upward slightly from the USDA estimate as middle and high-income consumers had not started to migrate to other products as anticipated. Low-income consumers are the traditional market covered by LICONSA and rehydrated milk made from WMP. The Post MY2010 consumption estimate remains unchanged from USDA estimate. Trade: The Post MY2012 import estimate remains unchanged from the USDA forecast of 25,000 MT. Although LICONSA has been switching to buying and supplying fluid milk, the demand for dairy products from low-income consumers led to slightly higher imports for dry WMP and resulted in a slight increase in the Post MY2011 estimate from the USDA estimate. MY2010 figures remain unchanged. Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics: Dairy, Dry Whole Milk Powder Me 2010 2011 2012 xico Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan Market Year Begin: Jan 2011 2012 1000 MT 2010 USDA New USDA New USDA New Official Post Official Post Official Post Beginning Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 Production 173 173 168 168 168 168 Other Imports 15 15 27 30 25 25 Total Imports 15 15 27 30 25 25 Total Supply 188 188 195 198 193 193 Other Exports 7 7 7 8 7 7 Total Exports 7 7 7 8 7 7 Human Dom. Consumption 181 181 188 190 186 186 Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dom. Consumption 181 181 188 190 186 186 Total Use 188 188 195 198 193 193 Ending Stocks 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Distribution 188 188 195 198 193 193 Commodities: Dairy, Milk, Fluid Dairy, Cheese Dairy, Butter Dairy, Milk, Nonfat Dry MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 10 Dairy, Dry Whole Milk Powder Policy: General Tariffs Currently, all U.S. dairy product exports enter Mexico duty-free. NOM-155-SCFI-2012 & NOM-183-SCFI-2012 On May 3, 2012 the Secretariat of Economy (SE) published in Mexico’s Federal Register (Diario Oficial) the Mexican Official Norms NOM-155-SCFI “Milk-Denomination, physical-chemical specifications, commercial information and testing methods” and NOM-183-SCFI-2012 “Dairy formula and combined dairy formula-Denomination, physical-chemical specifications, commercial information and testing methods”. These NOMs replace NOM-155-SCFI-2003, and encompass milk, dairy formulas, and combined dairy formulas in an effort to eliminate possible consumer confusion. The National Chamber of Milk Industries (CANILEC) has expressed dissatisfaction with this revised regulation as they perceive this modification is unnecessary and over-regulates the industry and will affect self-service stores that produce and sell their own brands. This, in turn, could affect the entire industry and increase production costs. Marketing: It is worth noting that Mexico became the first U.S. $1 billion market for U.S. dairy and related product exports in 2011. Total U.S. dairy product exports were approximately $1.2 billion. NFDM, cheese, and whey accounted for the bulk of the export values and amounted to approximately $600 million, $200 million, and $130 million, respectively. Through the first 3 months of 2012, year over year export values are considerably higher than last year and suggest promising opportunities for U.S. dairy products throughout the year. The United States exported $313 million of dairy products in the first 3 months of 2012 compared to $240 million for the first 3 months of 2011. The Mexican dairy industry is beginning to invest in publicity and promotion for added-value dairy products. These products, according to industry sources, require lower levels of raw material for their preparation and are more affordable. As such, industry members believe marginal promotion efforts could spur consumption of these products. In 2010, the total dairy products (UHT and pasteurized fluid milk, cheese, yoghurt, cream, chilled dairy snacks, and condensed/evaporated milk) market size was estimated at U.S. $9.65 billion. The industry is considered highly fragmented with a large number of small-scale artisan producers that distribute products locally or regionally. Fluid milk and added-value product processing is dominated by two brands; Lala and Alpura. The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) is active in promoting the U.S. dairy industry in Mexico. In addition, the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) Agricultural Trade Offices (ATOs) promote U.S. dairy exports, as well. The ATOs and USDEC develop promotion and sales opportunities for U.S. dairy products in the Mexican market. USDEC, as well, organizes buying missions for potential Mexican importers/distributors to visit U.S. suppliers. Author Defined: MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 11 For More Information FAS/Mexico Web Site: We are available at www.mexico-usda.com or visit the FAS headquarters' home page at www.fas.usda.gov for a complete selection of FAS worldwide agricultural reporting. For further information, direct marketing questions to: U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) Circuito Médicos No. 55 Interior 302 Ciudad Satélite, Naucalpan, Estado de México, 53100 México http://www.usdec.org Agricultural Trade Office, Mexico City Liverpool 31, Col. Juarez C.P. 06600 México, D.F. Phone: (011-52-55) 5140-2600 atomexico@fas.usda.gov http://www.mexico-usda.com Agricultural Trade Office, Monterrey Blvd. Diaz Ordaz No. 140, Torre 2, Piso 7 Col. Santa Maria C.P. 64650 Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (011-52-81) 8333-5289 atomonterrey@fas.usda.gov http://www.mexico-usda.com FAS/Mexico YouTube Channel: Catch the latest videos of FAS Mexico at work http://www.youtube.com/user/ATOMexicoCity Other Relevant Reports Submitted by FAS/Mexico: Report Number Subject Date Submitted MX2016 Livestock and Products Semi-Annual 3/21/2012 MX1106 Dairy Blends TRQ Announced 12/30/2011 MX1105 Milk Powder TRQ Announced 12/30/2011 MX1092 New Meat and Poultry Letterhead Certificates Required 12/6/2011 MX1083 Dairy and Products Annual 11/14/2011 MX1076 Mexico Eliminates Retaliatory Tariffs 10/21/2011 MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 12 Useful Mexican Web Sites: Mexico's equivalent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (SAGARPA) can be found at www.sagarpa.gob.mx, equivalent to the U.S. Department of Commerce (SE) can be found at www.economia.gob.mx and equivalent to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (SALUD) can be found at www.salud.gob.mx. These web sites are mentioned for the readers' convenience but USDA does NOT in any way endorse, guarantee the accuracy of, or necessarily concur with, the information contained on the mentioned sites. MX2028 Mexico Represents Nearly 25 Percent of U.S. Dairy Exports in 2011 Page 13
Posted: 20 May 2012

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