Exporter Guide 2012

An Expert's View about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in the Netherlands

Posted on: 27 Dec 2012

The exporter guide provides practical tips to U.S. exporters on how to conduct business in the Benelux countries.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 12/13/2012 GAIN Report Number: NL2038 Netherlands Exporter Guide Exporting to the Netherlands and Belgium Approved By: Mary Ellen Smith Prepared By: Marcel Pinckaers Report Highlights: The exporter guide provides practical tips to U.S. exporters on how to conduct business in the Benelux countries. The report also identifies the three market sectors (food retail, food service and food processing) and describes the best market entry approach and best high-value product prospects. The exporter guide finally focuses exclusively on consumer-oriented and fishery products. Section 1. Market Overview Marcoeconomic Situation and Trends The Netherlands: Because of the country’s strategic location on the North Sea and the Rhine, the Port of Rotterdam is among the most important sea ports in the world. Amsterdam Schiphol Airport occupies a similar position in Europe. Their geographic location and function as international hubs in Europe are seen as a major advantage. The ports of Rotterdam and Amsterdam have outstanding infrastructure and logistics services. The Dutch are business people. The population is highly educated, internationally oriented and largely multilingual. In September 2012, the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) forecasted that Dutch GDP will drop by 0.5 percent in 2012, in comparison to growth of 1.0 percent in 2011. In 2013 the economy is expected grow by 0.75 percent. The export of goods, an essential element of the Dutch economy, recovered rapidly from the recession with a growth of 13.5 percent in 2010 after a dramatic drop of 9.3 percent in 2009. However, recovery speed slowed down to 4.3 percent in 2011, and is expected to be stagnate in 2012 and in 2013 (both years 4.25 percent). The unemployment slightly decreased from 4.5 percent in 2010 to 4.4 percent in 2011, but is expected to increase to 5.25 percent in 2012 and 5.75 percent in 2013. The annual inflation rate increased from 0.9 percent in 2010 to 2.5 percent in 2011 and is expected to remain at 2.25 percent in 2012 and decrease to 1.75 percent in 2013. Purchasing power has been impacted by the recent economic downfall and government’s austerity measures; the negative growth continued from -0.5 percent in 2010 to -0.9 percent in 2011 and -1.75 percent in 2012. In 2013 the purchasing power is expected to slightly improve to -0.75 percent. Figure 1: Key Data Dutch Economy 2009 2010 2011 *2012 *2013 Economic Growth % -3.7 1.6 1.0 -0.5 0.75 Inflation (HIPC) % 1.0 0.9 2.5 2.5 1.75 Unemployment % 3.7 4.5 4.4 5.25 5.75 GDP (billion) €573 €589 €602 €609 €619 Source: Central Bureau of Statistics/Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis/Eurostat * ECON/FAS forecast Belgium: The Belgian economy recovers slowly from a broad-based contraction in the spring of 2012. The National Bank of Belgium (NBB) estimates GDP growth in 2012 at -0.1 percent and at +0.7 percent in 2013. The GOB agreed on a 2013 budget deficit of 2.15 percent of GDP, and seems to be well on track to have no budget deficit by 2015. A gradual pick-up is projected as world trade gathers pace and the dissipation of the euro area crisis boosts confidence. The unemployment rate will rise through 2013, but stabilize by 2014. Figure 2: Key Data Belgian Economy 2009 2010 2011 *2012 *2013 Economic Growth % -1.5 2.0 1.9 -0.1 0.7 Inflation (CPI) % -0.1 2.2 2.1 2.7 1.8 Unemployment % 7.9 8.4 8.3 7.4 7.7 GDP (billion) €321 €327 €334 €321 €327 Source: www.nbb.be * ECON/FAS forecast Benelux Importers Key in US Exports to the EU-27 Total US exports of agricultural, fish and forestry products increased by 18 percent in 2011 to USD 149 billion. With almost USD 12 billion, exports to the EU-27 increased by 8 percent in 2011. Based on the first 8 months, US exports to the EU-27 for 2012 are expected to decrease by 12 percent. The main focus of this report is on consumer-oriented and fish products. The EU continues to be an important market as 9 percent of all US exported Consumer-Oriented products end up in this market. The importance of the EU for US seafood exports is even greater as almost a quarter was sold on the EU market in 2011. More detailed data are available at http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats/BicoReport.aspx?type=country. Figure 3: US Exports Of Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Products, by Destination (in million USD) 2011 World EU-27 Benelux % of EU Bulk products 56,962 2,337 404 17% Intermediate products 25,359 2,756 833 30% Consumer Oriented products 54,054 4,648 1,343 29% Forest products 7,767 867 104 12% Fish and Seafood products 5,246 1,248 261 21% Total 149,387 10,860 2,945 27% Source: www.fas.usda.gov (BICO reports) After a decline in 2009, US exports of agricultural, fish and forestry products to the EU-27 are up for two years in a row (+ 8 percent in 2011). Although tree nuts, fish products and soybeans continue to be the largest product groups, fruit & vegetable juices, pulses, dairy products and (processed and fresh) fruit are gaining market share. More details on these figures can be downloaded on http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats/BicoReport.aspx?type=country The Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) is within the EU-27 an excellent market for US products, as it is responsible for over a quarter of all EU-27 imports of US agricultural, fish and forestry products (figure 3). Key Developments and the Impact on Consumer Buying Habits The Benelux has over 27 million inhabitants and is the most densely populated region in the EU, with 412 people per square kilometer. More than two-thirds of its slowly growing population lives in a 130 mile corridor stretching from Amsterdam to Brussels. The majority of households are dual income and the popularity of prepared food is growing. The double income (no kids) households are willing to pay additional money for convenience, variety, and health in food. As a result they are purchasing more meal components and ready-to-eat products, but this group is also experimenting more with ethnic cuisines and other concepts. Another development that drives changing consumer buying habits is the on-going trend towards smaller households. There are some 12 million households with an average size of 2.3 people. Single and two person households are growing and households of 4 or more persons declining. Not only does this trend demand smaller portions, industry contacts also claim that these consumers tend to buy more expensive, value-added products or meal components. The Benelux population is graying as the 0-20 age group is declining and the 65+ age group is growing rapidly. It is worth noting that the 65+ age group has a relatively high purchasing power since, in general, they live in paid-off houses and benefit from a pension. Figure 4: Key Demographic Figures For The Benelux 2008 2009 2010 2011 Population, in millions 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.1 Number of Households, in millions 12 12.1 12.4 12.5 Household Size 2.3 2.3 2.25 2.25 Source: CBS, Statbel Figure 5: Dutch Population By Age Group, In Percentage Year 0 – 19 20 – 39 40 – 64 65 – 79 80+ Total Population 1963 38.1 26.4 26.1 7.9 1.5 11,889,962 1973 35.0 29.0 25.6 8.6 1.8 13,387,623 1983 29.7 32.6 26.0 9.4 2.4 14,339,551 1993 24.6 32.9 29.5 10.0 3.0 15,239,182 2003 24.5 28.6 33.2 10.4 3.4 16,192,572 2011 23.5 25.0 35.9 11.6 4.0 16,655,799 Source: CBS Figure 6: Advantages And Challenges US Products Face In The Benelux Advantages Challenges Affluent and open-minded consumers Saturated markets Highly developed infrastructure Transatlantic transportation is Trade history and mentality costly and takes time Strong interest in experimenting with new and Competition from local/regional innovative products and/or concepts supply Favorable image of American products Tariffs and Non-Tariff trade barriers Highly consolidated retail industry Source: FAS/The Hague Figure 7: Consumer Trends Consumers’ needs and preferences: Health: natural ingredients, lower calories, low or no sugar, healthy meals Convenience: fresh pre-packed food components, take-away, fresh ready-to-eat meals Price: discount, special offers, will only accept higher prices when can be justified Food Safety: more information, more guarantees Stores: There is a need for the more traditional store that offers a wide assortment of products, fresh, specialty and luxury products, personalized service, etc. while on the other hand there is a need for discounters, stores that focus on price. Source: FAS/The Hague More Demand For Sustainable Food Products During the last decade, especially Dutch retailers have increasingly sourced food products which are either produced sustainably or obtained in a sustainable manner. The Dutch government recently published a report, Monitor Duurzaam Voedsel 2011, which gives an overview of consumer spending on sustainable food in the Netherlands. Sustainable food is one of the most important growth markets in food retail and foodservice markets. The turnover of sustainable food rose in 2011 by 30.5 percent while total spending on food in the same year only grew by 3.1 percent. As a result, the market share of sustainable food increased from 3.5 percent in 2010 to 4.5 percent last year. More information on the market for sustainable products can be found in GAIN NL 2014 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Retail%20Foods_The%20Hague_Netherland s_6-25-2012.pdf. The report ‘Using sustainability to market US foods in Europe’ provides information and analysis for US exporters of food and agricultural products on the topic of sustainability. More information can be found in GAIN AU12008 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Using%20%e2%80%98Sustainability%e2% 80%99%20to%20Market%20U.S.%20Foods%20In%20Europe_Vienna_EU-27_11-2-2012.pdf. The Market For Organic Food Continues To Grow The recently signed Partnership on Organics between the EU and U.S. offers export opportunities for U.S. organic products. The report ‘The EU-US organic equivalence cooperation’ provides information on the organic market in the EU and opportunities for U.S. products in light of the new arrangement. More information can be found in GAIN NL 2006 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/The%20EU- U.S.%20Organic%20Equivalence%20Cooperation_The%20Hague_Netherlands%20EU-27_2-15- 2012.pdf. Awareness of Health and Well-Being Consumers are becoming more aware of and concerned about the effects food has on their health and well-being. There has been a trend to a more healthful lifestyle in Western European countries. The following U.S. industries have all benefitted from this trend: nuts (pistachios, almonds, walnuts, etc.), fruits (cranberries, pomegranates, berries, etc.), seafood (salmon, halibut, etc.) and to some extent beans and lentils. Section 2. Exporter Business Tips Local Business Customs Following are some characteristics of doing business in the Netherlands, Belgium or Luxembourg: Most business people speak English and have a high level of education (Masters or Bachelors degree). Generally speaking, they are straightforward and business-minded. They want to be well informed about the product/service and their business partner before doing business. At the same time, they do not want to waste anybody’s time and can be quick decision makers. Due to the increasing power of retailers and to changing consumers’ demands, food processors and traders are increasingly looking for long-term partnerships rather than a one-off business transaction. Food Standards & Regulations and General Import & Inspection Procedures A detailed report on the Dutch import regulation standards and also on general import and inspection procedures can be found in GAIN Reports NL2005 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Food%20and%20Agricultural%20Import%2 0Regulations%20and%20Standards%20-%20Narrative_The%20Hague_Netherlands_2-15-2012.pdf. A detailed report on the Belgian import regulation standards and also on general import and inspection procedures can be found in GAIN Reports BE2002 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Food%20and%20Agricultural%20Import%2 0Regulations%20and%20Standards%20-%20Narrative_The%20Hague_Belgium-Luxembourg_2-15- 2012.pdf. Manufacturers (that are not eligible to export to the European Union) that want to send their products for e.g. exhibiting at a trade show or for research purposes can request an import waiver. However this practice is uncommon as the product cannot be consumed and must be destroyed under supervision. For the Netherlands, you can contact the Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA) for obtaining the right documents and specific requirements: NVWA Division PRIMEX Department TVE Import Postbus 3000 3330 DC Zwijndrecht Phone : +31 78 6112100 Fax: +31 78 6112141 E-mail: import@vwa.nl Internet : www.vwa.nl For Belgium, you can contact the Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FAVV) for obtaining the right documents and specific requirements: FAVV AC-Kruidtuin Food Safety Center Kruidtuinlaan 55 – 5th floor B-1000 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32 2 211 8622 Fax: +32 2 211 8640 Email: import.export@favv.be Internet: www.favv.be Section 3. Market Sector Structure And Trends The Food Retail Market The latest information available on the food retail market can be found in GAIN Report NL2014 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Retail%20Foods_The%20Hague_Netherland s_6-25-2012.pdf. The Foodservice Market The latest information available on the foodservice market can be found in GAIN Report NL2021 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Food%20Service%20- %20Hotel%20Restaurant%20Institutional_The%20Hague_Netherlands_6-27-2012.pdf. The Food Processing Market The latest information available on the food processing market can be found in GAIN Report NL2022 or http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Food%20Processing%20Ingredients_The%2 0Hague_Netherlands_6-28-2012.pdf. Private Label Products The market share for private label products continues to go up in most European markets. The largest market shares are to be found in the Western European countries, led by Spain (49 percent), the U.K. (47 percent) and Portugal (43 percent). Belgium and the Netherlands had a market share of 40 percent and 36 percent, respectively. Market shares in the Nordic region and most of the Central and Eastern European countries are between 25 percent and 30 percent. The market share of private label is high in retail markets that are highly consolidated and innovative. Several retailers in the Benelux market have developed two private labels; one focusing on price whereas the other is aiming at adding value. Consumers are discovering the good value for money that private label brands are offering; they can be a good alternative for A- branded products. Private label seems to fare well not only in years of recession but also in more prosperous times. The profitability of private label products has fueled retailers’ interest to offer more private label products (e.g. gluten-free, healthy, and organic) and move into other areas of private label (e.g. bakery and cosmetics). The on-going expansion of local and international discounters continues to boost the growing market for private label products as well. There are great possibilities for U.S. suppliers of tree nuts, peanuts, pulses, rice, fruit (juices), seafood, and other food ingredients. Section 4. Best High-value Products Prospects Figure 8: Netherlands, The Best High-Value Products Prospects, USD 1,000 Comm Imports from US, odity / Imports, Market Attractiveness 2011 (U.S. m Key Constraints Over arket code 2011 Market Development for USA share) Food 812,064 134,590 (17%) competition from the Benelux has a big preparations / Germany and Belgium export-focused food 210690 processing industry Bovine Cuts 637,125 93,398 (15%) Competition from Demand for good quality Boneless / Australia, Uruguay, beef and willingness to 020130 Argentina and Ireland pay a premium price Sawdust and 248,969 76,570 (31%) Competition from Demand for bio-fuels wood waste / Canada and Portugal 440130 Almonds / 100,990 73,919 (73%) US represents three Strong demand from food 080212 quarter of total imports, manufacturers, competition comes from confectionary and snack Spain industry Pistachios / 90,853 62,539 (69%) competition from Iran Strong demand from food 080250 manufacturers, confectionary and snack industry Foliage / 233,614 55,681 (24%) depending on the Benelux countries 060491 developments in the cut dominate global trade in flower industry, cut flowers and therefore competition from Costa the trade in foliage within Rica, Israel and the EU Guatemala Vegetable seeds 329,081 49,830 (15%) Competition from Highly sophisticated, / 120991 France, China and Chile specialized and internationally operating horticultural industry Grapefruit / 184,603 37,603 (20%) Competition from South Demand for healthy 080540 Africa, China and Spain products and good quality fresh fruit Fruit and other 229,265 34,151 (15%) competition from India, Demand for healthy edible parts of Costa Rica and Ecuador products and good quality plants / 200899 fresh produce Non alcoholic 281,276 26,525 (9%) Competition from Demand for innovative beverages / Germany, Belgium, the drinks 220290 UK and France Walnuts / 40,398 14,143 (35%) Competition from India Demand for healthy 080232 and Chile products and ingredients, U.S. continues to be a steady and large supplier of walnuts Sweet potatoes / 28,048 12,345 (44%) Competition from South Demand for new, healthy 071420 Africa, Israel and China and quality products Wine / 2204 1,161,633 10,715 (1%) competition from France, per capita consumption of Germany and other New wine continues to grow in World Wine countries the Benelux countries, demand for new world wines grows Sockeye 8,514 7,734 (91%) There is no real Demand for healthy and Salmon / competition sustainable products, 030311 demand for seafood is up, Alaska seafood has great image Cane molasses / 46,837 6,439 (14%) Competition from India Sophisticated food 170310 processing industry Berries / 36,791 2,442 (7%) Competition from Demand for healthy 081020 Mexico, Spain and products and good quality Poland fresh fruit Scallops / 5,081 1,714 (34%) Competition from Growing awareness and 030721 Denmark demand in the high-end HRI industry Frozen Orange 115,345 1,656 (1%) Competition from most Demand for good quality juice / 200911 of Latin American frozen juice by flavoring countries and South and beverage industry and Africa traders Source: World Trade Atlas Figure 9: Belgium, The Best High-Value Products Prospects, USD 1,000 Comm Imports from US, Key Constraints odity / Imports ractiveness for 2011 (U.S. market Over M Market Attarket code 2011 USA share) Development Orange juice 239,175 44,371 (19%) Competition from Demand for healthy products, / 200912 most of Latin demand for fruit (products) is American countries good, US is a good supplier of citrus products Scallops / 78,923 37,243 (47%) Competition from Growing awareness and demand 030729 Denmark in the high-end HRI industry Butter / 487,241 16,246 (3%) Competition from Sophisticated food processing 040510 Netherlands, Ireland, industry France and Germany Nuts & 69,133 11,510 (17%) Competition from Strong demand from food Seeds / Turkey, Italy and manufacturers, confectionary 200819 Spain and snack industry Mixes & 113,408 4,675 (4%) Competition from Demand for specialty and value Doughs / France, Netherlands added processed food products 190120 and Germany Walnuts / 13,015 4,188 (32%) Competition from Demand for healthy products 080232 France, Italy and India and ingredients, U.S. continues to be a steady and large supplier of walnuts Source: World Trade Atlas Section 5. Key Contacts and Further Information U.S. Embassy FAS/The Hague Marcel Pinckaers Lange Voorhout 102, 2514 EJ The Hague, The Netherlands Phone: +31-70-310-2305 Fax: +31-70-365-7681 E-mail: marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov Website: www.usembassy.nl/fas.html or www.fas.usda.gov To obtain the appropriate commodity code for your product, you can contact the Dutch customs at +31 45 574 3031 or visit the following website http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/dds/en/tarhome.htm. This website also provides tariff classification and rates. It is also possible to obtain a written binding ruling called a Binding Tariff Information (BTI). This will provide assurances that you have the correct tariff classification for your product. More information on how to apply for BTI is available online at: http://www.douane.nl/zakelijk/invoer/en/invoer-05.html More information on EU import duties can be found on http://useu.usmission.gov/agri/import.html. Marketing An overview of leading trade shows can be found in Appendix 2. U.S. Cooperators An overview of U.S. cooperators can be found at http://www.usaedc.org/about.cfm#members (click on “Click Here for a list of USAEDC Members”). Be aware that not all US cooperators have programs for the European market. Appendix 1. Leading Wholesalers/Distributors in the Benelux Deli XL Hanos / ISPC Mr. D. Slootweg Mr. H. van Looijengoed P.O. Box 440 P.O. Box 10378 Frankeneng 18 Stadhoudersmolenweg 37 6710 BK, Ede, the Netherlands 7301 GJ, Apeldoorn, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)318-678911 P: +31-(0)55-5294444 F: +31-(0)318-622347 F: +31-(0)55-5224621 E: dick.slootweg@ahold.nl E: hvanlooijengoed@hanos.nl W: www.delixl.nl W: www.hanos.nl JAVA De Kruidenier Foodservices Nederland Wingepark 10 Sluisjesdijk 111 B-3110 Rotselaar, Belgium 3087 AE Rotterdam, the Netherlands P: +32-(0)16 589 620 P: +31-(0)10-4950790 F: +32-(0)16 589 611 F: +31-(0)10-4956696 W: www.jave-coffee.be E: info@kruidenier.nl W: www.kruidenier.nl De Kweker Makro (Metro Cash & Carry) Mr. Jan Boer Mr. M. (Maarten) Van Hamburg P.O. Box 59345 Mr. B. Eijssink Jan van Gaalenstraat 4 Diermervijver, Gebouw Vijverpoort, Dalsteindreef 101-139 1040 KH, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 1112 XC Diemen, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)20-6063606 P: +31-(0)20-3980200 F: +31-(0)20-6063600 F: +31-(0)20-3980201 E: info@kweker.nl I: bas.eijssink@metro-mcc.nl W: www.kweker.nl W: www.makro.nl Sligro - VEN VHC – MAXXAM Mr. R. van Herpen P.O. Box 90 Mr. J. te Voert 3340 AB Hedrik-Ido-Ambacht, the Netherlands P.O. Box 47 P: +31-(0)78-6833400 Corridor 11 F: +31-(0)78-6833830 5460 AA, Veghel, the Netherlands I: info@vhc.nl P: +31-(0)413-343500 W: www.vhc.nl F: +31-(0)413-341520 W: www.maxxam.nl E: info@sligro.nl E: jtevoert@sligro.nl W: www.sligro.nl Source: FAS/The Hague Appendix 2. Trade Shows Trade Shows Frequently Visited by Benelux Food Buyers Show When Show Details & Organizers HORECAVA, Amsterdam, January 07 – tel: + 31-(0)20-5753032 The Netherlands 10, 2013 fax: + 31-(0)20-5753093 National hotel and restaurant show www.horecava.nl Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 International Confectionary Fair (ISM), January 27 – www.ism-cologne.com Cologne, Germany 30, 2013 European confectionary show Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov Fruit logistica, Berlin, Germany February 6 – www.fruitlogistica.com European fresh fruit and vegetable show 8, 2013 *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov BioFach, Nuremberg, Germany February 13 - www.biofach.de European organic show 16, 2013 *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov International Trade Fair Wine and Spirits, March 24 – www.prowein.com Dusseldorf (ProWein), Germany 26, 2013 European wine and spirits show Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov European Seafood Exhibition (ESE), April 23 – 25, tel: +1-207-8425504 Brussels, Belgium 2013 fax: +1-207-8425505 World’s largest seafood show www.euroseafood.com *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov Trade Shows Frequently Visited by Benelux Food Buyers Show When Show Details & Organizers +31 70 3102 305 World of Private Label (PLMA) May 28 – 29, tel: +31-(0)20-5753032 Amsterdam, The Netherlands 2013 fax: +31-(0)20-5753093 Europe’s largest private label show www.plmainternational.com Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 Anuga, Cologne, Germany October 05 - tel: +49 221 821 99 2240 Europe’s largest food & beverages show 09, 2013 fax: +49 221 821 99 3410 in 2013 www.anuga.com *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov Horeca Expo, Gent, Belgium November 17 tel: +32-(0)9-2419211 Regional hotel, restaurant and catering - 21, 2013 fax: +32-(0)9-2419475 show email: horeca@flandersexpo.be Contact: Marcel Pinckaers www.horecaexpo.be marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 Food Ingredients Europe, Frankfurt, November 19 http://fieurope.ingredientsnetwork.com/ Germany – 21, 2013 *USDA Endorsed Show* Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov Tavola, Kortrijk, Belgium March 16 – www.tavola-xpo.be Regional food retail show 18, 2014 Contact: Marcel Pinckaers marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov +31 70 3102 305 Interzoo, Nuremberg, Germany May 29 – www.interzoo.com Petfood show June 01, 2014 *USDA Endorsed Show* Trade Show Office Contact: Andrea Fennesz Berka +43 1313 39 2364 Trade Shows Frequently Visited by Benelux Food Buyers Show When Show Details & Organizers andrea.fennesz-berka@fas.usda.gov Source: FAS/The Hague Appendix 3. An Overview Of The Leading Benelux Importers Of Specialty Foods Supplying Both Foodservice And Food Retail (in alphabetic order) American Food Service Bickery Food Group Mr. G. Chin-A-Kwie Mr. J. Manassen Gageldijk 1 P.O. Box 433 3602 AG Maarssen, the Netherlands 1200 AK, Hilversum, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)30-2613604 P: +31-(0)35-6560244 F: +31-(0)30-2613624 F: +31-(0)35-6563824 E: g.chin@americanfood.nl E: joost.manassen@bickery.nl W: www.americanfood.nl W: www.bickery.nl Engel Foreign Food GranFood Mr. W. Westerveld Mr. O. Brokke Ondernemingsweg 264 P.O. Box 19045 1422 DZ, Uithoorn, the Netherlands Saturnusstraat 43 P: +31-(0)297-533833 2500 CA, The Hague, the Netherlands F: +31-(0)297-531665 P: +31-(0)70-3815007 E: w.westerveld@effbv.nl F: +31-(0)70-3850259 W: www.engelforeignfood.com E: obrokke@granfood.nl W: www.granfood.nl Maer Foods Pietercil Barends Mr. H. Rijpma Mr. D. van Bueren P.O. Box 79 Bleiswijkseweg 51 7590 AB, Denekamp, the Netherlands 2280 AB, Zoetemeer, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)541-358010 P: +31-(0)79-3441148 F: +31-(0)541-358011 F: +31-(0)79-3424549 E: hillebrand.rijpma@maerfoods.eu E: danny.van.Bueren@pietercil.com W: www.maerfoods.eu W: www.pietercil.com Pietercil Delby’s Two Food Mr. P. Deschaepmeester Mrs. L. van Eijden-Vellekoop Vitseroelstraat 74 Steenhoffstraat 5 B-1740 Ternat, Belgium 3764 BH Soest, the Netherlands tel.: +32 2583 81 00 P: +31-(0)35-6090990 fax: +32 2582 29 63 F: +31-(0)35-6090988 E:philippe.de.schaepmeester@pietercil.com E: info@2food.nl W: www.pietercil.com W: www.2food.nl Wessanen Wonderfood Mr. R. Miedema Mr. M. Lazraq P.O. Box 2554 Avenue de L’Artisanat, 6 Beneluxlaan 9 4420 Braine-l’Alleud, Belgium 3500 GN, Utrecht, the Netherlands P: +32-(0)2-332-1320 P: +31-(0)30-2988738 F: +32-(0)2-403-0740 F: +31-(0)30-2988703 E: majid@wonderfood.eu E: richard.miedema@wessanen.com W: www.wonderfood.eu W: www.wessanen.com Zenobia Mr. P. Cosse Rue du Grand Cortil 17 B-1300 Wavre, Belgium P: +32-(0)10-222394 F: +32-(0)10-222394 E: info@zenobia.be W: www.zenobia.be Source: FAS/The Hague Table A. Key Trade & Demographic Information For The Netherlands & Belgium 2011 Figures The Netherlands: Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Imports From All Countries (USD 64,244 / 3 Million) / U.S. Market Share (%) Consumer Oriented Food Imports From All Countries (USD 30,126 / 3 Million) / U.S. Market Share (%) Fish and Seafood Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / 3,129 / 3 U.S. Market Share (%) Population (Million) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 16.7 / almost 1 Number of Major Metropolitan Areas Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (USD) 46,627 Unemployment Rate (%) 4.4 Source: World Trade Atlas Belgium: Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. 44,044 / 2 Market Share (%) Consumer Oriented Food Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. 22,232 / 2 Market Share (%) Fish and Seafood Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. Market 2,256 / 2 Share (%) Total Population (Millions) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 10.7 / 0.5 Number of Major Metropolitan Areas Brussels and Antwerp Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (USD) 40,748 Unemployment Rate (%) 7.4 Source: World Trade Atlas Exchange Rate Year USD EURO 2001 1 1.12 2002 1 1.06 2003 1 0.88 2004 1 0.81 2005 1 0.80 2006 1 0.80 2007 1 0.73 2008 1 0.68 2009 1 0.72 2010 1 0.75 2011 1 0.76 Table B. Consumer-Oriented & Fish Products Imports Imports from the World Imports from the US. US Market Share Netherlands Imports 2009 2010 2011 2009 2010 2011 2009 2010 2011 USD Million USD Million % CONSUMER- ORIENTED AGR 3 ICULTURAL 25,689 26,462 30,126 704 735 843 3 3 TOTAL Food preparations / 210690 660 677 812 117 113 135 18 17 17 Meat of bovine animals / 020130 657 564 637 49 57 93 7 10 15 Almonds / 080212 84 92 101 53 66 74 63 72 73 Pistachios / 080250 115 106 91 86 71 63 75 67 69 Foliage / 060491 231 224 234 43 44 56 19 20 24 Grapefruit / 080540 163 188 185 24 37 38 15 20 21 Fruit & edible plants / 200899 199 211 229 29 34 34 15 16 15 Nuts / 080290 51 68 70 16 23 33 31 34 47 Nonalcoholic beverages / 220290 330 337 281 19 31 27 6 9 10 Juice / 200980 243 250 261 22 24 26 9 10 10 Orange juice / 200919 352 412 482 2 12 25 1 3 5 Enzymes / 350790 212 206 258 14 15 14 7 7 5 Walnuts / 080232 20 28 40 8 12 14 40 43 35 Sweet potatoes / 071420 16 19 28 4 8 12 25 42 43 Tomato paste / 200290 65 61 98 1 0 12 2 0 12 Grapefruit juice / 200929 39 39 50 11 7 10 28 18 20 Wine / 220421 1,006 982 976 19 8 9 2 1 1 Other Consumer- Oriented Products 21,246 21,998 25,293 187 173 168 1 1 1 FISH & SEAFOOD 646 2,654 3,129 92 88 99 3 3 3 PRODUCTS 2, Fish fillets / 030429 522 462 606 35 34 33 7 7 5 Cod / 030352 76 75 97 14 18 22 18 24 23 Scallops / 030729 31 35 36 12 7 10 39 20 28 Salmon / 160411 16 15 14 9 6 8 56 40 57 Frozen sockeye salmon / 030311 6 8 9 5 7 8 83 88 89 Other Fishery Products 1,995 2,059 2,367 17 16 18 1 1 1 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 44,991 47,576 57,748 1,423 1,815 1,998 3 4 3 TOTAL AGRICULTURAL, FISH & FORESTRY 50,510 53,237 64,244 1,592 1,994 2,225 3 4 3 TOTAL Source: World Trade Atlas Imports from the Imports from the US Market World US. Share Belgium Imports 200 201 201 2009 2010 2011 2009 2010 2011 9 0 1 USD Million USD Million % CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGRICULTURAL 19,82 19,43 22,23 TOTAL 274 287 415 1 1 2 4 1 2 Pistachios / 080250 104 73 88 67 41 54 64 56 61 Orange juice, Brix value >20 / 200919 517 358 467 8 13 46 2 4 10 Orange juice, Brix value <20 / 200912 210 221 239 9 23 44 4 10 18 Almonds / 080212 55 60 72 27 32 42 49 53 58 Food preparations / 210690 454 458 588 16 20 35 4 4 6 Foliage / 060491 67 62 60 26 28 21 39 45 35 Pet food / 230910 525 457 484 20 18 21 4 4 4 Butter / 040510 286 378 487 0 6 16 0 2 3 Nuts / 200819 66 81 100 1 9 12 2 11 12 Bread, pastry, cakes / 190590 580 552 662 2 9 12 0 2 2 Grapefruit / 080540 51 27 26 15 6 9 29 22 35 Enzymes / 350790 147 147 159 8 8 9 5 5 6 Wine / 220421 838 762 840 3 5 7 0 1 1 Meat of horses / 020500 109 96 106 0 1 7 0 1 7 Cocoa preparations / 180690 214 214 231 2 2 5 1 1 2 Mixes and doughs / 190120 111 96 113 3 4 5 3 4 4 15,49 15,38 17,51 Other Consumer-Oriented Products 0 9 0 67 62 70 0 0 0 FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS 1,907 1,945 2,256 32 39 55 2 2 2 Scallops, frozen / 030729 37 51 79 15 23 37 41 45 47 Fish fillets / 030429 212 233 281 2 2 4 1 1 1 Scallops, fresh / 030721 12 11 12 4 3 3 33 27 25 Sockeye salmon / 030311 0 1 3 0 1 3 3 97 91 Pacific salmon / 030319 3 4 3 2 3 2 67 75 67 Other Fishery Products 1,643 1,645 1,878 9 7 6 1 0 0 32,04 31,82 38,49 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 513 544 732 2 2 2 TOTAL 4 2 4 AGRICULTURAL, FISH & FORESTRY 36,71 36,65 44,04 TOTAL 604 629 854 2 2 2 1 0 4 Source: World Trade Atlas Table C. Top 15 Suppliers Of Consumer Foods And Edible Fishery Products CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGRICULTURAL TOTAL FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS Report: Netherlands Imports Report: Netherlands Imports USD 1,000 2009 2010 2011 USD 1,000 2009 2010 2011 Germany 5,103,300 4,998,991 5,648,565 Iceland 372,106 351,233 411,927 Belgium 3,796,620 3,904,268 4,498,960 Germany 326,098 314,726 398,821 Brazil 1,796,040 1,808,351 2,150,081 Belgium 209,080 163,622 211,024 France 1,726,205 1,760,150 1,866,697 China 171,684 157,361 185,726 Spain 1,355,936 1,493,167 1,563,069 Norway 137,286 143,235 154,988 United Kingdom 860,181 925,512 1,153,495 United Kingdom 105,097 120,618 151,653 Italy 752,963 877,468 956,499 Vietnam 119,362 129,349 148,929 South Africa 830,156 988,403 936,545 Morocco 139,528 151,913 147,808 United States 703,633 734,682 843,497 Russia 71,306 72,416 134,844 Poland 699,466 693,501 826,132 Denmark 106,235 112,712 123,580 Other 8,065,186 8,277,991 9,682,615 United States 91,759 87,923 98,854 World 25,689,686 26,462,484 30,126,155 Other 796,547 849,285 961,042 World 2,646,088 2,654,393 3,129,196 Source: World Trade Atlas CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGRICULTURAL TOTAL FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS Report: Belgium Imports Report: Belgium Imports USD 1,000 2009 2010 2011 USD 1,000 2009 2010 2011 Netherlands 4,575,725 4,610,777 5,386,900 Netherlands 499,489 472,114 546,257 France 4,713,482 4,573,462 5,247,457 France 207,163 196,389 224,393 Germany 2,419,009 2,338,712 2,721,191 Bangladesh 88,511 106,768 124,069 Spain 910,473 933,251 970,963 Germany 117,612 114,677 113,350 Italy 815,911 810,144 894,582 India 65,160 67,049 109,267 United Kingdom 474,835 505,720 650,168 Denmark 85,991 89,475 107,998 Colombia 637,987 643,260 648,825 China 69,024 85,181 97,173 Brazil 689,267 547,374 558,918 Vietnam 95,478 87,370 87,272 Costa Rica 493,514 429,800 439,669 United Kingdom 68,377 74,599 83,340 United States 273,887 287,181 415,307 Iceland 83,097 79,462 79,955 Ecuador 345,065 348,699 379,995 Ecuador 39,372 33,796 72,577 Other 3,474,570 3,402,202 3,917,688 United States 32,220 38,788 55,411 World 19,823,725 19,430,582 22,231,663 Other 455,120 499,709 555,416 World 1,906,614 1,945,377 2,256,478 Source: World Trade Atlas
Posted: 27 December 2012

See more from Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in the Netherlands

Expert Views    
Potatoes and Potato Products Annual 2012   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Organic Food Opportunities   By UK Trade & Investment
How to export Seafood to the EU   By U.S. Commercial Service
Tree Nuts Annual 2011   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Danish Presidency Priorities for the Agriculture Sector   By Foreign Agricultural Service