The Food Processing and Trading Market in the Netherlands

A Hot Tip about Food , Beverages and Tobacco in the Netherlands

Posted on: 22 Dec 2009

This report provides an overview for US companies interested in exporting to the Benelux countries (Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg). Figures of the first 4 months of 2009 show that the current economic situation has strengthened the importance of the Benelux as a consumer, food processing and trading market for US products.

Required Report - public distribution Date: 7/28/2009 GAIN Report Number: NL9015 Netherlands EXPORTER GUIDE ANNUAL BENELUX COUNTRIES Approved By: Stephen Huete Prepared By: Marcel Pinckaers Report Highlights: This report provides an overview for US companies interested in exporting to the Benelux countries (Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg). Figures of the first 4 months of 2009 show that the current economic situation has strengthened the importance of the Benelux as a consumer, food processing and trading market for US products. Post: The Hague Author Defined: Section 1. Market Overview Marcoeconomic Situation and Trends The Netherlands: Because of the country?s strategic location on the North Sea and the Rhine, trade and distribution are in the Dutch genes. The Port of Rotterdam is among the most important sea ports in the world. Amsterdam Schiphol Airport occupies a similar position in Europe. Their geographic location and function as international hubs in Europe are seen as a major advantage. The ports of Rotterdam and Amsterdam have outstanding infrastructure and logistics services. The Dutch are business people. The population is highly educated, internationally oriented and largely multilingual. This explains why the Netherlands has proved attractive for foreign companies. In June 2009, the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) forecast that Dutch GDP will shrink by almost 5 percent in comparison to 2 percent growth in 2008. In 2010 the economy will not recover as the GDP will drop further by 0.50 percent. The export of goods, an essential element of the Dutch economy, is expected to show a dramatic drop of -16.25 percent this year and a small recovery of 0.5 percent in 2010. Unemployment will increase from 4 percent in 2008 to 5.5 percent in 2009 and 9.5 percent in 2010. At the same time inflation will remain low at 1 percent in both 2009 and 2010. Figure 1: Key Data Dutch Economy 2006 2007 2008 2009* 2010** Economic Growth % 3.25 3.5 2.1 -4.75 -0.50 Inflation (HIPC) % 1.7 1.6 2.5 1.0 1.25 Unemployment % 5.5 4.5 3.9 5.5 9.50 GDP (billion) ?535 ?567 ?595 ?571 ?574 Source: Central Bureau of Statistics/Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis * FAS/The Hague estimate ** FAS/The Hague forecast Belgium: Belgium suffered a significant recession in 2008?2009, and economic activity will likely remain weak into 2010. After slowing in recent quarters, growth turned negative in the fourth quarter of 2008, and the contraction is forecast to continue throughout 2009, with a weak recovery beginning only in 2010. Economic stimulus packages in many countries and looser monetary policy will help cushion the global downturn, but Belgian growth is still expected to fall to around - 3 percent in 2009, as the recovery in the world economy will be slowed by the aftermath of the financial crisis. Risks to the forecast are large and tilted to the downside, mainly reflecting the high uncertainties surrounding the international environment. Unemployment will rise, eventually peaking well above 8 percent during the downturn. Inflation is estimated to fall to around 1 percent in 2009. Figure 2: Key Data Belgian Economy 2006 2007 2008 2009* Economic Growth % 3.0 2.6 1.0 -3.1 Inflation (CPI) % 2.3 1.8 4.5 1.0 Unemployment % 8.3 7.5 7.0 8.5 GDP (billion) ?319 ?327 ?330 ?320 Source: www.nbb.be * FAS/The Hague estimate Benelux Importers Key in US Exports to the EU-27 Total US exports of agricultural, fish and forestry products grew in 2008 to USD 126 billion [1] . Roughly 10% of those exports were shipped to the EU-27. For the purpose of this report, the main focus is on the Consumer-Oriented agricultural and Fishery and seafood products. The EU market continues to be an important one as 10% of all US exported Consumer-Oriented products end up on this market. The importance of the EU for US seafood exports is even greater as 30% was sold on the EU market in 2008. For more information look at the following BICO reports, http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/bico/bico.asp?Entry=lout&doc=527, http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/bico/bico.asp?Entry=lout&doc=402, http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/bico/bico.asp?Entry=lout&doc=358 and below figure. Figure 3: US Exports Of Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Products, by Destination (in million USD) 2008 World EU-27 Benelux Bulk products 51,743 3,346 687 Intermediate products 21,192 2,382 535 Consumer Oriented products 42,503 4,366 1,093 Forest products 6,606 1,096 99 Fish and Seafood products 3,987 1,109 205 Total 126,033 12,299 2,619 Source: www.fas.usda.gov (BICO reports) The exports of US Consumer-Oriented products to the EU continue to grow and denote the highest export levels, USD 4.4 million in 2008. Although tree nuts still is the largest product group by far, exports of processed fruit & vegetables, wine & beer, red meats and fresh fruit are the drivers behind this trend. Fish fillets (mainly Alaska pollack) and salmon still boost the exports of fishery products. Figure 4: US Exports Of Consumer-Oriented Agricultural And Fish & Seafood Products to the EU- 27 (in 1,000 USD) US exports to the EU-27 CY CY CY CY Jan-Apr Jan-Apr 2005 2006 2007 2008 2008 2009 Consumer-Oriented Agricultural Total 3,505,047 3,606,857 3,837,377 4,366,199 1,379,783 1,194,020 Snack Foods (Excl Nuts) 85,174 83,686 103,086 117,606 35,864 34661 Breakfast Cereals & Pancake Mix 10,791 9,113 11,903 15,692 4,086 6,090 Red Meats, Fresh/Chilled/Frozen 151,040 117,786 121,969 251,927 67,755 40,844 Red Meats, Prepared/Preserved 4,746 5,772 3,429 5,702 1,892 988 Poultry Meat 173,916 121,520 131,143 130,892 24,106 57,705 Dairy Products 44,890 84,946 152,350 144,883 60,738 23,995 Eggs & Products 43,200 44,668 73,374 70,054 21,719 23,598 Fresh Fruit 154,649 151,007 179,791 199,405 71,418 58,457 Fresh Vegetables 40,663 35,134 39,248 45,871 21,477 18,100 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 262,398 320,283 371,757 529,875 157,276 139,330 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 121,012 165,290 142,379 164,616 61,821 61,828 Tree Nuts 1,546,698 1,445,846 1,428,281 1,475,145 447,704 375,744 Wine & Beer 329,244 476,025 468,118 493,284 158,797 113,643 Nursery Products & Cut Flowers 83,584 83,872 109,597 102,172 50,044 41,378 Pet Foods (Dog & Cat Food) 86,548 84,297 99,358 91,493 31,079 20,377 Other Consumer-Oriented Products 366,494 377,611 401,594 527,584 164,006 177,218 Fish & Seafood Products, Edible Total 927,694 1,043,411 1,067,416 1,108,528 374,455 259,986 Salmon, Whole Or Eviscerated 68,396 80,319 106,078 110,446 27,443 12,254 Salmon, Canned 84,372 81,859 88,856 90,597 31,740 18,233 Crab & Crabmeat 1,475 2,124 3,436 5,133 2,096 2,214 Surimi (Fish Paste) 69,961 42,583 32,098 47,163 13,984 9,407 Roe & Urchin (Fish Eggs) 19,732 19,614 34,230 54,112 14,635 4,412 Other Edible Fish & Seafood 683,758 816,912 802,718 801,077 284,557 213,466 Source: www.fas.usda.gov (BICO reports) The Benelux proves to be an excellent consumer, food processing and trading market for US products as Benelux importers are responsible for a quarter of all Consumer-Oriented products and almost a fifth of all Fishery products imported into the EU. The first 2009 figures are showing that the current economic situation has only strengthened the importance of the Benelux. The current economic situation is affecting US exports. During the first 4 months of this year, exports of Consumer-Oriented products to the EU dropped by 13.5% while exports of Seafood products dropped by almost a third. However, the drop in exports to the Benelux countries was much lower; US exports of Consumer-Oriented and Seafood products decreased by respectively 2 and 14%. As a result, the Benelux trade is gaining market share as almost a third of all Consumer-Oriented products and almost a quarter of Seafood products are currently being imported by Benelux traders. Figure 5: US Exports Of Consumer-Oriented Agricultural And Fish & Seafood Products to the Benelux (in 1,000 USD) US exports to Belgium/Netherlands/Luxembourg CY CY CY CY Jan-Apr Jan-Apr 2005 2006 2007 2008 2008 2009 Consumer-Oriented Agricultural Total 861,107 913,467 950,101 1,092,531 370,665 361,833 Snack Foods (Excl Nuts) 12,581 11,527 21,662 18,201 5,144 6,903 Breakfast Cereals & Pancake Mix 1,553 1,419 2,570 3,832 1,028 1,337 Red Meats, Fresh/Chilled/Frozen 34,084 33,442 42,583 78,013 17,973 20,329 Red Meats, Prepared/Preserved 1,289 1,456 716 1,272 414 395 Poultry Meat 651 581 1,328 4,210 974 857 Dairy Products 10,374 28,752 72,351 57,105 27,268 8,189 Eggs & Products 3,876 7,663 14,133 7,937 2,483 1,812 Fresh Fruit 42,745 27,733 33,698 45,721 21,313 14,182 Fresh Vegetables 8,781 8,154 8,492 11,208 6,129 4,580 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 57,511 71,353 75,691 104,520 28,591 28,380 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 94,362 125,055 114,829 136,393 48,930 54,987 Tree Nuts 335,412 337,678 307,213 324,847 101,688 111,702 Wine & Beer 46,272 47,479 27,798 33,934 11,910 8,082 Nursery Products & Cut Flowers 64,175 67,024 85,476 79,308 41,281 30,079 Pet Foods (Dog & Cat Food) 26,812 33,240 25,614 21,863 7,481 7,579 Other Consumer-Oriented Products 120,630 110,909 115,945 164,167 48,057 62,441 Fish & Seafood Products, Edible Total 183,161 206,531 184,166 204,510 69,480 59,761 Salmon, Whole Or Eviscerated 11,158 10,916 11,199 12,849 1,048 807 Salmon, Canned 9,124 9,924 10,397 14,987 6,956 4,198 Crab & Crabmeat 341 1,469 920 2,124 1,176 1,729 Surimi (Fish Paste) 14,995 10,735 2,964 6,506 932 4,069 Roe & Urchin (Fish Eggs) 4,752 3,300 5,675 22,912 4,940 281 Other Edible Fish & Seafood 142,790 170,187 153,011 145,133 54,426 48,677 Source: www.fas.usda.gov (BICO reports) Key Developments and the Impact on Consumer Buying Habits The Benelux has over 27.8 million inhabitants and is the most densely populated region in the EU, with 412 people per square kilometer. More than two-thirds of its slowly growing population lives in a 100 mile corridor stretching from Amsterdam to Brussels. During the past decades more and more women have entered the labor force. This has resulted in double-income households, where time has become scarce. In their spare time they want to focus on their family/friends, health/well-being and travel. It seems that daily cooking is not on that priority list unless it?s part of spending time with family/friends. The double income households are still willing to pay additional money for convenience, variety, taste, and health in food. As a result they are purchasing more meal components and ready-to- cook products, but also this group is experimenting more with ethnic cuisines. Another development that drives changing consumer buying habits is the on-going trend towards smaller households. There are some 12 million households with an average size of 2.3 people. Single and two person households are growing and households of 4 or more persons declining. Not only does this trend demand smaller portions, industry contacts also claim that consumers tend to buy more expensive, value-added products or meal components when cooking for only one or two persons. The Benelux population is graying as the 0-20 and 65+ age group is respectively declining and growing rapidly. It is worth noting that the 65+ age group has a relatively high purchasing power since, in general, they live in paid-off houses and benefit from a good pension. Figure 6: Key Demographic Figures For The Benelux 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009* Population, in millions 26.7 26.8 27.4 27.6 27.8 Number of Households, in millions 11.5 11.7 11.9 12 12.1 Household Size 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 Source: CBS, Statbel * FAS/The Hague estimate Figure 7: Dutch Population By Age Group, In Percentage Year 0 ? 19 20 ? 39 40 ? 64 65 ? 79 80+ Total Population 1963 38.1 26.4 26.1 7.9 1.5 11,889,962 1973 35.0 29.0 25.6 8.6 1.8 13,387,623 1983 29.7 32.6 26.0 9.4 2.4 14,339,551 1993 24.6 32.9 29.5 10.0 3.0 15,239,182 2003 24.5 28.6 33.2 10.4 3.4 16,192,572 2009* 23.9 25.7 35.5 11.2 3.8 16,486,587 Source: CBS, * CBS estimate Figure 8: Main Non-Dutch Population, By Ethnicity 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009* Indonesian 396,080 393,057 389,940 387,124 384,497 Turkish 358,846 364,333 368,600 372,852 378,330 Surinamese 329,430 331,890 333,504 335,679 338,678 Moroccan 315,821 323,239 329,493 335,208 341,528 Netherlands Antilles & Aruba 130,538 129,683 129,965 131,387 134,774 Source: CBS, * CBS estimate Figure 9: Advantages And Challenges US Products Face In The Benelux Advantages Challenges Affluent and open-minded consumers Saturated markets Highly developed infrastructure, trade High transportation and time costs history and mentality Competition from local companies Strong interest in buying new and Tariffs and Non-Tariff trade barriers innovative products and/or concepts Highly consolidated retail industry Favorable image of American products Current economical condition Source: FAS/The Hague Figure 10: Consumer Trends Consumers? needs and preferences: Health: natural ingredients, lower calories, low or no sugar, healthy meals Convenience: fresh pre-packed food components, take-away, fresh ready-to-eat meals Price: discount, special offers, will only accept higher prices as long as they can be justified Food Safety: more information, more guarantees Stores: there is a need for the more traditional store that offers a wide assortment of products, fresh, specialty and luxury products, personalized service, etc. while on the other hand there is a need for discounters, stores that focus on price. Source: FAS/The Hague Changing Tastes The non-Dutch population in the Netherlands (20%) has grown by 5 percent during the past 2 years, whereas the population with Dutch ethnicity grew during the same period by only 1 percent. As a result there has been strong growth in the number of stores serving ethnic niche markets and in demand for non-traditional Dutch food. The non-Belgian population in Belgium is much smaller and accounts for only 7%. More information on this subject can be found on http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp GAIN NL 7021. Organic Food Recent figures show that although consumers are increasingly buying organic products (mainly bread and dairy products), the organic industry still remains a niche industry and has only 1.8 percent market share in the Benelux. More information on the Benelux market for organic products can be found on http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp GAIN NL 6024. Awareness of Health and Well-Being Consumers are becoming more aware of and concerned about the effects food has on their health and well-being. One driver is that there has been a trend to a more healthful lifestyle in Western countries. The following US industries have all benefitted from this trend: nuts (pistachios, almonds, walnuts, etc.), fruits (cranberries, pomegranates, berries, etc.), seafood (salmon, halibut, etc.). Another driver is that consumers are more cautious about their diet due to foodborne illnesses. Consumers are looking for and finding more information on this topic; the media, including the Internet, TV and magazines, respond to this desire and feed into it. Food processors and retailers play a crucial role, as well, as they develop and market food products to create, anticipate and meet consumers? needs. Section 2. Exporter Business Tips Local Business Customs Following are some characteristics of doing business in the Netherlands, Belgium or Luxembourg: Most business people speak English and have a high level of education (Masters or Bachelors degree). Generally speaking, they are straightforward and business-minded. They want to be well informed about the product/service and their business partner before doing business. At the same time, they do not want to waste their time and can be quick decision makers. Due to the increasing power of retailers and to changing consumers? demands, food processors are increasingly looking for long-term partnerships rather than a one-off business transaction. In times of a weaker dollar, importers are especially looking for added value from the US. They are looking for healthy or unique products for their retail/foodservice customers. Food Standards & Regulations and General Import & Inspection Procedures A detailed report on import regulation standards and also on general import and inspection procedures can be found on the FAS homepage: GAIN Report Number: NL8017 and BE8006. http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp Section 3. Market Sector Structure And Trends The Food Retail Market In 2008, the turnover of the food retail industry was an estimated USD 71 billion (1 USD=0.684 ?). The consolidated full-service supermarket sector makes around 90% of total food retail sales. The remaining 10% includes food sales made at department stores, delicatessen stores and traditionally non-food stores. Supermarkets: The distribution in the Benelux supermarket industry is consolidated. Belgium and the Netherlands have respectively 3 and 2 large distributions chains. Figure 11: Supermarket Chains In Belgium, 2008 market shares Pruchase Group Market Share, % Supermarket Format Market Share, % Carrefour 28.5 - Carrefour 26.0 -Mestdagh 2.5 Colruyt 23.0 - Colruyt 18.0 -Spar 3.0 -Alvo 2.0 Delhaize 23.0 - delhaize 23.0 Aldi 12.5 - Aldi 12.5 Lidl 4.5 - Lidl 4.5 Louis Delhaize 3.5 - Louis Delhaize - -Match Bel - -Profi - Intermarche 2.0 - Intermarche 2.0 Other 3.0 - Other 3.0 Source: Store Check, FAS/TheHague calculations Figure 12: Supermarket Chains In The Netherlands, 2008 market shares Purchase Group Market Share, % Supermarket Format Market Share, % Albert Heijn 31.3 - Albert Heijn 30.0 -AH XL 1.3 Superunie 30.7 - Plus 6.1 -Jumbo 4.8 -Sligro 2.7 -Coop 2.5 -Spar 2.2 -Other 12.4 Schuitema 13.2 - C1000 13.2 Aldi 8.5 - Aldi 8.5 Super de Boer 6.8 - Super de Boer 6.8 Lidl 4.8 - Lidl 4.8 Other 4.7 - Other 4.7 Source: AC Nielsen/ FAS/TheHague calculations Besides the traditional supermarket chains as discussed above, we see firms entering the food retail market. Not only are traditionally non-food retailers like Ikea, HEMA and V&D succesfully selling food products, also up-scale department stores and delicatessen stores are selling specialty food products and drinks. Department Stores: Department stores, generally part of a larger chain, offer only profitable specialty foods. More and more the traditionally non-food upscale department stores are selling food products, although still on a small scale. They have become an excellent outlet for selling specialty foods. They mainly focus on innovative and seasonal or event-related specialty products. Some smaller independent non-food stores are following this trend as well. Other non-food retail chains (like De Tuinen and Xenos) have moved into food retailing as well, by focusing on healthy foods, or for instance Asian and Mediterranean cuisines. Figure 13: Leading Department Stores In The Benelux Company Name Website Bijenkorf www.bijenkorf.nl Hema www.hema.nl Inno www.inno.be V&D www.vd.nl Source: FAS/The Hague Figure 14: Leading Non-Food Retail Chains In The Benelux Selling Specialty Foods Company Name Website De Tuinen www.detuinen.nl Oil & Vinegar www.oilvinegar.com Xenos www.xenos.nl Source: FAS/The Hague More information on this segment can be found in the following report, http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp GAIN NL 7021. Delicatessen Stores: Traditional butcher and fruit & vegetable shops, as well as small independent family-run supermarkets, are losing market share. The supermarkets are either taken over by big retail chains or in most cases are closing down. The traditional butcher and fruit & vegetable shops are increasingly transforming into delicatessen shops (selling luxury meal components, snacks, etc) or moving into catering. By adding more value to their once basic products, they manage to stay in business and serve products that the regular retailer does not sell. The current economic situation is having an impact on Benelux consumers? spending. As their confidence in the economy has gone down and they are worried about their savings, jobs and pensions, consumers are noticeably spending less money on eating out. Restaurant owners were first hit by the smoking-ban in July 2008. A year later industry experts are saying that spending in restaurants has dropped considerably. Especially, the more expensive restaurants have been hit hard. Consumers are choosing more often to stay home and prepare themselves a luxurious meal, which is beneficial to the food retailers. On the other hand retailers see that their customers are more price sensitive than before, less loyal and increasingly shopping at discounters like the German based Aldi and Lidl but also Colruyt, Dirk van de Broek, Digros, etc. The Foodservice Market The turnover of the Benelux HRI foodservice industry in 2008 was over an estimated USD 30 billion (1USD=0.684 ?). Restaurants dominate the Benelux foodservice industry and make up roughly 50% of the industry. Restaurant owners are generally independent entrepreneurs, working with both local suppliers and wholesalers. An overview of leading Dutch wholesalers and distributors are detailed in Appendix 1. The second largest foodservice segment covers all caf├ęs and bars, where the focus is mainly on serving drinks and to a much lesser extent finger foods and basic meals. Finally, a handful of international and national players dominate the much smaller fast food (20%) and catering industry (10%) and their products are delivered through proprietary large distributors. For more information on the HRI foodservice market please visit www.fas.usda.gov GAIN NL9002. Unfortunately, the same obstacles that limit sales to the retail sector hamper potential U.S. sales to the foodservice industry. Basic products such as regular beef and poultry are essentially barred from the market due to sanitary restrictions, while high tariffs and the restrictions on many biotech products keep many US processed foods off store shelves. The Food Processing Market The food processing industry is an important sector in the Benelux economy as it represents about 10% of total GDP. The industry has an estimated turnover of USD 116 billion for 2008 [2] . Within the food processing industry, the production of meat and dairy products forms the largest segment, followed by cigarettes, bakery, confectionary, flour and sugar industries. Figure 16: An Overview Of The Benelux Food Processing Market, 2008 figures Turnover food processing industry USD 116 billion Number of processing companies 5,400 US exports to the Benelux: - Bulk Agricultural Products USD 687 million - Intermediate Agricultural Products USD 535 million - Consumer-Oriented Agricultural Products USD 1,093 million - Fish and Seafood Products USD 205 million Source: FAS/The Hague The majority of the processing companies are located close to the main port cities of Rotterdam, Antwerp and Amsterdam. Knowledgeable traders, an excellent distribution system and an innovative economy make the Benelux an attractive market for processing and trading agricultural products. Although the Benelux itself has a population of only 27.8 million people, the food processing industry has access to roughly 75 million affluent consumers within 200 miles of the Benelux border, or 15% of the total EU population. This densely populated region covers important markets like North Rhine Westphalia, London and Paris. Germany, France and the UK continue to be important markets for the processing industry; however, greater growth opportunities are to be found in Southern, Central and Eastern Europe. Processors therefore benefit from the expansion of the EU. Opportunities are also to be found outside the EU, in growing markets in South America and Asia. Section 4. Best High-value Products Prospects Figure 17: The Best High-Value Products Prospects Benelux Benelux Commod Imports Imports from Key Constraints Over Market Attractiveness for ity 2008, US 2008, Market Development USA (USD 1,000) (USD 1,000) Scallops / 15,987 9,975 p rice - lack of growing demand in the 030721 knowledge by customer high end HRI industry Salmon 37,672 10,843 s ome competition from great image and growing prepared or Canada demand preserved / 160411 Milk and 417,418 13,376 c ompetition from the Benelux has a big cream in solid Germany, France and export-focused food form / Poland processing industry 040210 Food 929,475 131,109 c ompetition from the Benelux has a big preparations / Germany and export-focused food 210690 Switzerland processing industry Almonds / 146,208 92,043 U S represents 63% of growing demand from 080212 total imports, some the food ingredients competition comes from market Spain Pistachios / 180,898 132,820 c ompetition from Iran growing demand from 080250 the snack food and confectionary industry Fruit and 225,880 13,24,742 c ompetition from Costa other edible Rica, India and Ecuador parts of plants / 200899 Foliage / 323,583 90,029 D epending on the Benelux dominates 060491 developments in the global trade in cut cutflower industry, flowers and therefore the competition from Costa trade in foliage within Rica, Guatemala, Israel, the EU Mexico, etc. Fresh fruit 7,250,370 80,045 C ompetition from South Benelux is important in Africa, Chile, Spain, importing and Brazil, etc. distributing fresh fruit within the EU Wine / 2204 2,808,234 41,039 c ompetition from per capita consumption France, Germany and of wine continues to New World Wine grow in the Benelux countries Source: World Trade Atlas Section 5. Key Contacts and Further Information U.S. Embassy FAS/The Hague Mr. Marcel Pinckaers Lange Voorhout 102, 2514 EJ The Hague, The Netherlands Phone: +31-70-310-2305 Fax: +31-70-365-7681 E-mail: marcel.pinckaers@fas.usda.gov Website: www.usembassy.nl/fas.html or www.fas.usda.gov To obtain the appropriate commodity code for your product, you can contact the Dutch customs at +31 45 574 3031 or visit the following website http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/dds/en/tarhome.htm. This website also provides tariff classification and rates. It is also possible to obtain a written binding ruling called a Binding Tariff Information (BTI). This will provide assurances that you have the correct tariff classification for your product. More information on how to apply for BTI is available online at: http://www.douane.nl/zakelijk/invoer/en/invoer-05.html More information on EU import duties can be found on http://useu.usmission.gov/agri/import.html. Marketing An overview of leading trade shows can be found in Appendix 2. Reports Related Reports from FAS/The Hague and other European offices can be found on http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/attacherep/default.asp. Below you will find a selection of the reports from FAS/The Hague. Figure 18: FAS/The Hague recent reports Report Number Report Title Date Released NL5002/BE5001 Benelux Horticulture Report 01/2005 NL6009 Dutch Snack and Confectionary Market 03/2006 NL6017 Consolidation Food Retail Market 06/2006 NL6024 Benelux Organic Market 07/2006 NL7002/BE7001 Benelux Tree Nuts Market 01/2007 NL7008 Benelux Beef Market 04/2007 NL7021 Dutch Specialty Foods 09/2007 NL7028/BE7006 Food Retail 11/2007 NL8009 EU Seafood Marketing Report 04/2008 NL8012 Food Processing Industry 06/2008 NL8017/BE8006 FAIRS 09/2008 NL8022 Export Certification Guide 10/2008 NL8025 Frozen Potato Report 11/2008 NL9002 HRI Foodservice Industry 01/2009 NL9009 Fishery Report 04/2009 For more information on exporting to the Benelux market but also marketing related questions, please contact Marcel Pinckaers at marcel.pinckaers@usda.gov or +31 (0)70-3102 305. Appendix 1. Leading Wholesalers/Distributors in the Benelux (in alphabetical order) Deli XL Hanos Mr. D. Slootweg Mr. V. Looijengoed P.O. Box 440 P.O. Box 10378 Frankeneng 18 Stadhoudersmolenweg 37 6710 BK, Ede, the Netherlands 7301 GJ, Apeldoorn, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)318-678911 P: +31-(0)55-5294444 F: +31-(0)318-622347 F: +31-(0)55-5224621 E: dick.slootweg@ahold.nl E: hvanlooijengoed@hanos.nl W: www.delixl.nl W: www.hanos.nl ISPC JAVA Mr. M. Vugts Wingepark 10 Kalshoven 25 B-3110 Rotselaar, Belgium 4825 AL, Breda, the Netherlands P: +32-(0)16 589 620 P: +31-(0)76-5726726 F: +32-(0)16 589 611 F: +31-(0)76-5726810 W: www.jave-coffee.be E: mvugts@ispc-int.com W: www.ispc-int.com De Kweker Makro (Metro Cash & Carry) Mr. P. Poelstra Mr. J. Cervera P.O. Box 59345 Diermervijver, Gebouw Vijverpoort, Jan van Gaalenstraat 4 Dalsteindreef 101-139 1040 KH, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 1112 XC Diemen, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)20-6063606 P: +31-(0)20-3980200 F: +31-(0)20-6063600 F: +31-(0)20-3980201 E: info@kweker.nl W: www.makro.nl W: www.kweker.nl Sligro Mr. R. van Herpen P.O. Box 47 Corridor 11 5460 AA, Veghel, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)413-343500 F: +31-(0)413-341520 I: info@sligro.nl W: www.sligro.nl Source: FAS/The Hague Appendix 2. Trade Shows Food Shows Frequently Visited by Benelux Food Buyers Show When Show Organizers Fresh Rotterdam, Rotterdam, September 21 - 23, 2009 tel: +31-(0)10-2933300 The Netherlands Bi-Annual fax: +31-(0)10-2933399 Fruit & vegetable trade show www.freshrotterdam.nl Food Week, Utrecht, The September 28 - 30, 2009 tel: +31-(0)30-2952799 Netherlands fax: +31-(0)30-2952814 National food and beverage trade www.foodweek.nl show ANUGA, Cologne, Germany. October 10 ? 14, 2009 tel: +49-180-5204220 Europe?s largest food & beverages Bi-Annual fax: +49-221-821991010 trade show in 2009 www.anuga.com *USDA Endorsed Show* Trade Show Office Contact: Sharon Cook tel: +1-202-7203425 Sharon.Cook@usda.gov Hortifair, Amsterdam, The October 13 ? 16, 2009 tel: +31 (0)297-344033 Netherlands Annual fax: +31 (0)297-326850 Worldwide Horticultural Trade Fair www.hortifair.nl info@hortifair.nl Horeca Expo, Gent, Belgium November 22 ? 26, 2009 tel: +32-(0)9-2419211 Regional Hotel, Restaurant and fax: +32-(0)9-2419475 Catering Show email: horeca@flandersexpo.be www.horecaexpo.be HORECAVA, Amsterdam, January 11 ? 14, 2010 tel: + 31-(0)20-5753032 The Netherlands fax: + 31-(0)20-5753093 National Hotel and Restaurant www.horecava.nl Show European Fine Food Fair, January 25 ? 27, 2010 tel: +31-(0)43-3838383 Maastricht, The Netherlands fax: +31-(0)43-383830 Regional high-end Hotel and www.efff.nl Restaurant Show European Seafood Exhibition, April 27 ? 29, 2010 tel: +1-207-8425504 Brussels, Belgium fax: +1-207-8425505 One of the world?s largest seafood www.euroseafood.com trade show *USDA Endorsed Show* Trade Show Office Contact: Sharon Cook tel: +1-202-7203425 Sharon.Cook@usda.gov World of Private Label (PLMA) May 18 ? 19, 2010 tel: +31-(0)20-5753032 Amsterdam, The Netherlands fax: +31-(0)20-5753093 Europe?s largest Private Label trade www.plmainternational.com show SIAL, Paris, France October 19 -23, 2010 tel: +33-(0)1-49685498 Europe?s largest food & beverages Bi-Annual Show fax: +33-(0)1-49685632 trade show in 2010 www.sial.fr *USDA Endorsed Show* Trade Show Office Contact: Sharon Cook tel: +1-202-7203425 Sharon.Cook@usda.gov Source: FAS/The Hague Appendix 3. An Overview Of The Leading Benelux Importers Of Specialty Foods Supplying Both Foodservice And Food Retail (in alphabetical order) American Food Service Bickery Food Group Mr. G. Chin-A-Kwie Mr. J. Manassen Gageldijk 1 P.O. Box 433 3602 AG Maarssen, the Netherlands 1200 AK, Hilversum, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)30-2613604 P: +31-(0)35-6560244 F: +31-(0)30-2613624 F: +31-(0)35-6563824 E: gchin@americanfood.nl E: joost.manassen@bickery.nl W: www.americanfood.nl W: www.bickery.nl Engel Foreign Food GranFood Mr. W. Engel Mr. S. Mozzi Ondernemingsweg 264 P.O. Box 19045 1422 DZ, Uithoorn, the Netherlands Saturnusstraat 43 P: +31-(0)297-533833 2500 CA, The Hague, the Netherlands F: +31-(0)297-531665 P: +31-(0)70-3815007 E: w.engel@xs4all.nl F: +31-(0)70-3850259 W: www.engelforeignfood.com E: stefano.mozzi@granfood.nl W: www.grandfood.nl Maer Foods Pietercil Barends Mr. H. Rijpma Mr. D. van Bueren P.O. Box 79 Bleiswijkseweg 51 7590 AB, Denekamp, the Netherlands 2280 AB, Zoetemeer, the Netherlands P: +31-(0)541-358010 P: +31-(0)79-3441148 F: +31-(0)541-358011 F: +31-(0)79-3424549 E: hillebrand.rijpma@maerfoods.eu E: danny.van.Bueren@pietercil.com W: www.maerfoods.eu W: www.pietercil.com Pietercil Delby?s Two Food Mr. P. Deschaepmeester Mrs. L. van Eijden-Vellekoop Vitseroelstraat 74 Vosseveldlaan 23 B-1740 Ternat, Belgium 3768 GK, Soest, the Netherlands tel.: +32 2583 81 00 P: +31-(0)35-6090990 fax: +32 2582 29 63 F: +31-(0)35-6090988 E:philippe.deschaepmeester@pietercil.com E: info@twofood.nl W: www.pietercil.com W: www.twofood.nl Wessanen ZENOBIA Mr. R. Miedema Mr. P. Cosse P.O. Box 2554 Rue du Grand Cortil 17 Beneluxlaan 9 B-1300 Wavre, Belgium 3500 GN, Utrecht, the Netherlands P: +32-(0)10-222394 P: +31-(0)30-2988738 F: +32-(0)10-222394 F: +31-(0)30-2988703 E: Richard.Miedema@wessanen.com W: www.boas.nl Source: FAS/The Hague Table A. Key Trade & Demographic Information For The Netherlands & Belgium, 2008 Figures The Netherlands Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Imports From All Countries (USD 55,871 / 3.8 Million) / U.S. Market Share (%) Consumer Oriented Food Imports From All Countries (USD Million) 27,104 / 2.7 / U.S. Market Share (%) Fish and Seafood Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. 2,804 / 3.5 Market Share (%) Population (Million) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 16.5 / 0.6 Number of Major Metropolitan Areas Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (USD) 51,070 Unemployment Rate (%) 3.9 Source: World Trade Atlas Belgium Agricultural, Fish and Forestry Imports From All Countries (USD 42,671 / 1.7 Million) / U.S. Market Share (%) Consumer Oriented Food Imports From All Countries (USD Million) 22,537 / 1.4 / U.S. Market Share (%) Fish and Seafood Imports From All Countries (USD Million) / U.S. 2,236 / 1.4 Market Share (%) Total Population (Millions) / Annual Growth Rate (%) 10.4 / 0.2 Number of Major Metropolitan Areas Brussels and Antwerp Per Capita Gross Domestic Product (USD) 46,663 Unemployment Rate (%) 7.0 Source: World Trade Atlas Exchange Rate Year USD EURO 2001 1 1.12 2002 1 1.06 2003 1 0.88 2004 1 0.81 2005 1 0.80 2006 1 0.80 2007 1 0.73 2008 1 0.68 2009* 1 0.75 * Average exchange rate from Jan ? Jun, 2009. Table B. Consumer Food & Edible Fishery Products Imports Imports from the World Imports from the US. US Market Share Netherlands Imports 2006 2007 2008 2006 2007 2006 2007 2008 USD Million USD Million % CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGR 20,585 25,168 27,104 596 656 725 2.89 2.61 2.68 ICULTURAL TOTAL Snack Foods (Excl. Nuts) 1,100 1,414 1,450 5 10 9 0.47 0.67 0.60 Breakfast Cereals & Pancake Mix 85 101 125 0 0 0 0.35 0.20 0.34 Red Meats, Fresh/Chilled/Frozen 1,880 2,440 2,842 6 16 44 0.34 0.67 1.55 Red Meats, Prepared/Preserved 765 884 1,233 0 1 0 0.06 0.08 0 Poultry Meat 528 732 745 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0 Dairy Products (Excl. Cheese) 2,230 2,848 2,514 15 27 26 0.67 0.93 1.05 Cheese 611 731 880 0 6 14 0.05 0.86 1.61 Eggs & Products 135 170 223 5 7 7 3.43 4.35 3.04 Fresh Fruit 3,025 3,565 4,079 26 28 45 0.86 0.78 1.10 Fresh Vegetables 1,427 1,707 1,605 5 3 6 0.35 0.19 0.35 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 1,441 1,954 1,964 37 40 68 2.53 2.05 3.49 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 1,129 1,131 1,284 71 63 61 6.30 5.61 4.78 Tree Nuts 557 603 613 171 165 145 30.72 27.40 23.68 Wine & Beer 1,132 1,433 1,482 40 36 35 3.55 2.48 2.36 Nursery Products & Cut Flowers 1,366 1,624 1,854 58 65 64 4.26 3.98 3.44 Pet Foods (Dog & Cat Food) 202 249 259 7 9 6 3.67 3.78 2.49 Other Consumer-Oriented Products 2,973 3,580 3,952 148 179 194 4.98 5.01 4.90 FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS 2,256 2,622 2,804 78 71 99 3.47 2.72 3.53 Salmon 75 85 88 12 14 16 16.04 16.24 18.51 Surimi 45 63 46 2 1 3 5.07 2.06 5.93 Crustaceans 417 470 616 5 1 2 1.18 0.15 0.34 Groundfish & Flatfish 1,053 1,247 1,215 38 32 51 3.65 2.57 4.20 Molluscs 117 109 109 14 16 19 11.58 14.59 17.37 Other Fishery Products 548 648 729 7 8 8 1.26 1.17 1.08 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 1,587 1,949 4.19 3.78 3.95 TOTA 32,967 42,001 49,402 1,381 L AGRICULTURAL, FISH & FORESTRY TOTA 38,281 48,429 55,871 1,494 1,694 2,093 3.90 3.50 3.75 L Source: World Trade Atlas Imports from the Imports from the US. US Market Share Belgium Imp Worldorts 2006 2007 2008 2006 2007 2006 2007 2008 USD Million USD Million % CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGR 16,496 20,008 22,537 214 271 320 1.29 1.36 1.42 ICULTURAL TOTAL Snack Foods (Excl. Nuts) 967 1,141 1,243 2 2 3 0.17 0.16 0.23 Breakfast Cereals & Pancake Mix 128 141 169 0 0 1 0.21 0.16 0.56 Red Meats, Fresh/Chilled/Frozen 893 980 1,177 9 9 12 1.01 0.86 1.01 Red Meats, Prepared/Preserved 594 720 809 0 0 0 0.01 0.01 0.01 Poultry Meat 301 372 417 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0 Dairy Products (Excl. Cheese) 1,672 2,257 2,222 3 8 12 0.15 0.35 0.53 Cheese 1,077 1,245 1,473 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0 Eggs & Products 100 127 158 0 0 0 0.23 0.33 0.13 Fresh Fruit 2,800 3,148 3,765 28 35 35 1.00 1.10 0.93 Fresh Vegetables 892 1,137 1,165 0 0 0 0.01 0.01 0.02 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 1,240 1,524 1,805 16 20 25 1.26 1.30 1.40 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 733 979 1,044 12 15 13 1.61 1.58 1.28 Tree Nuts 261 315 372 63 85 118 23.93 27.09 31.64 Wine & Beer 1,240 1,642 1,850 5 4 7 0.40 0.22 0.40 Nursery Products & Cut Flowers 474 560 618 24 35 35 5.02 6.32 5.59 Pet Foods (Dog & Cat Food) 385 447 534 24 20 16 6.24 4.57 3.05 Other Consumer-Oriented Products 2,739 3,292 3,717 29 38 42 1.06 1.14 1.13 FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS 1,886 2,093 2,236 40 33 30 2.13 1.57 1.32 Salmon 118 120 129 7 4 4 5.67 3.42 3.38 Surimi 9 10 11 0 0 0 0.59 0.00 0 Crustaceans 702 809 859 2 3 4 0.34 0.32 0.45 Groundfish & Flatfish 547 573 615 5 5 3 0.86 0.93 0.55 Molluscs 211 224 230 20 15 13 9.67 6.91 5.81 Other Fishery Products 300 356 392 6 5 5 2.01 1.50 1.17 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 25,149 30,945 37,118 482 626 634 1.91 2.02 1.71 TOTAL AGRICULTURAL, FISH & ,721 36,483 42,671 560 699 706 1.88 1.92 1.65 FORESTRY TOTA 29L Source: World Trade Atlas Table C. Top 15 Suppliers Of Consumer Foods And Edible Fishery Products CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGRICULTURAL TOTA FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS L Report: Netherlands Imports - Top 15 Report: Netherlands Imports - Top 15 Ranking Ranking USD 1,000 2006 2007 2008 USD 1,000 2006 2007 2008 Germany 4,352,899 5,411,300 5,577,861 Iceland 394,939 435,645 406,764 Belgium 3,040,564 3,619,036 3,813,742 Germany 277,522 327,687 309,521 France 1,475,816 1,975,657 2,010,130 Belgium 149,860 191,530 177,957 Brazil 1,331,409 1,640,251 1,668,153 China 131,269 152,384 175,872 Spain 1,202,776 1,402,330 1,374,072 Denmark 135,840 155,836 148,358 South Africa 605,016 794,552 909,393 Vietnam 103,890 135,447 142,695 UK 623,721 790,573 904,262 Norway 53,772 115,300 137,508 Italy 506,659 650,352 748,639 Morocco 51,272 75,188 129,333 Chile 464,252 556,803 744,106 Ecuador 40,126 70,191 122,636 U.S.A. 595,885 655,566 725,032 UK 134,046 143,474 119,956 Other 8,386,267 7,671,240 8,628,563 U.S.A. 78,183 71,199 98,943 World 20,585,264 25,167,660 27,103,953 Other 705,624 702,670 833,985 World 2,256,343 2,621,551 2,803,528 Source: World Trade Atlas CONSUMER-ORIENTED AGRICULTURAL TOTAL FISH & SEAFOOD PRODUCTS Report: Belgium Imports - Top 15 Ranking Report: Belgium Imports - Top 15 Ranking USD 1,000 2006 2007 2008 USD 1,000 2006 2007 2008 France 4,133,697 5,021,317 5,694,429 Netherlands 434,145 498,375 548,420 Netherlands 3,629,290 4,486,297 4,013,684 France 190,683 200,729 221,419 Germany 2,083,771 2,566,755 2,781,765 Bangladesh 96,609 119,964 134,973 Spain 696,691 832,044 949,309 Germany 102,882 119,058 134,186 Italy 656,548 757,698 884,962 China 62,626 89,902 106,546 Brazil 496,246 692,887 711,226 Denmark 106,937 101,602 102,928 Colombia 452,956 364,137 709,401 India 96,420 109,203 98,377 Costa Rica 350,922 562,729 658,085 Vietnam 83,119 82,950 96,076 New Zealand 438,642 421,555 534,020 U.K. 79,144 80,225 83,230 UK 458,127 537,488 532,643 Iceland 87,673 96,008 74,142 Ecuador 267,429 373,280 380,695 Indonesia 65,350 65,645 60,957 U.S.A. 213,533 271,341 319,684 U.S.A. 40,254 32,819 29,617 Other 2,618,003 3,120,949 4,367,522 Other 440,417 496,269 545,113 World 16,495,855 20,008,477 22,537,425 World 1,886,259 2,092,749 2,235,984 Source: World Trade Atlas [1] Highest export levels since at least CY 1970 [2] Estimates by FAS/The Hague based on figures of the FNLI and Centrale Raad voor het Bedrijfsleven
Posted: 22 December 2009

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