Fresh Deciduous Fruit Annual

An Expert's View about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in New Zealand

Posted on: 27 Nov 2011

Apple production in 2011/2012 is estimated at 472,400 tons, down about 2% from the 2010/2011 production level. The decline is largely attributed to lower yield stemming from alternation. Pear production is estimated at 15,200 tons, up about 6 percent from the previous year, the increase is attributed to increased area and better yields.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 11/1/2011 GAIN Report Number: NZ114 New Zealand Fresh Deciduous Fruit Annual Fresh Apple and Pear Production and Trade November 2011 Approved By: Joseph Carroll, Agricultural Counselor Prepared By: David Lee-Jones, Agricultural Specialist Report Highlights: Apple production in 2011/2012 is estimated at 472,400 tons, down about 2% from the 2010/2011 production level. The decline is largely attributed to lower yield stemming from alternation. Pear production is estimated at 15,200 tons, up about 6 percent from the previous year, the increase is attributed to increased area and better yields. MY 2011 apple exports are estimated at 287,000 tons, down 9,000 tons (3%) from the estimated 296,000 tons exported in MY2010. Executive Summary: The growing of deciduous fruit in New Zealand is a financially tough business. Total planted area is expected to decline slightly in 2011/2012 and is estimated at 8,880 hectares (ha), with an estimated 8,400 ha planted in apples and 480 ha planted to pears. Total apple production in 2011/2012 is estimated at 472,400 tons, down about 2% from the 2010/2011 production level. The decline is largely attributed to lower yield stemming from alternation. Pear production is estimated at 15,200 tons, up about 6 percent from the previous year, the increase is attributed to increased area and better yields. Grower returns for the 2010/11 exporting season are estimated at NZ$20-21/TCE (Tray Carton Equivalent, 18.0 kilograms of fruit), roughly the same level as breakeven costs, hence there is little evidence of profit. Traders attribute the strengthening of the NZ dollar as a leading cause for lower returns for 2010/2011. There exists a wide range in the anticipated returns associated with individual apple varieties, with higher returns reported for deep red, sweet apple varieties (Pacific series, Royal Gala and Fuji) exported to markets in South East Asia, China, Taiwan and India. However, production levels for these varieties are not sufficient to make a difference in the overall profitability realized by the sector. In line with the decline in production and an anticipated increase in domestic processing volumes, apple exports in 2011/2012 are forecast at 287,000 tons, down about 3% from the estimated 296,000 tons exported in 2010/2011. The trend toward increased exports to the Pacific Rim, SEA, and India at the expense of exports to the E.U. will likely continue. On the trade policy front, NZ apples gained access to the Australia market following nearly a 100 year absence. Once the fireblight issue (the basis for Australia?s ban on imports) was resolved in New Zealand?s favor at the WTO, the relevant government authorities got to work and agreed on a protocol for imports. The first shipment of apples crossed the Tasman Sea to Australia on August 19th, 2011. The resumption of trade has not, however, been smooth sailing, with 5 tons of the first 17 tons of consignments destined for export rejected on the grounds of vegetative residue and insects found in the cartons. Possibly of equal note on the trade policy front, is an agreement between NZ and China on an updated protocol for NZ apples exported to China. The updated protocol (signed September 28, 2011) includes new measures for fireblight control and an improved process for resolution of phyto-sanitary issues, which allows trade access to be maintained while the issue is addressed. Commodities: Apples, Fresh Pears, Fresh Production, Supply and Demand Data Statistics 2009 2010 2011 Apples, Fresh New 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 Zealand Market Year Begin: Oct 2009 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 USDA New USDA New USDA New (HA Official al )/(MT) Post Offici Post Official Post Area Planted 8,897 8,632 9,061 8,470 8,400 Area Harvested 8,630 8,334 8,850 8,316 8,320 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 0 Total Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 406,633 423,000 460,000 464,740 460,000 Non-Comm. Production 16,000 16,000 16,000 15,000 12,400 Production 422,633 439,000 476,000 479,740 472,400 Imports 1,355 1,349 1,000 1,260 1,600 Total Supply 423,988 440,349 477,000 481,000 474,000 Fresh Dom. Consumption 61,988 60,000 62,000 60,000 60,000 Exports 257,000 258,982 290,000 296,000 287,000 For Processing 105,000 121,367 125,000 125,000 127,000 Withdrawal From Market 0 0 0 Total Distribution 423,988 440,349 477,000 481,000 474,000 TS=TD 0 0 0 0 2009 2010 2011 Pears, Fresh New 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 Zealand Market Year Begin: Oct 2009 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 Official New Post Official New Post Official New Post Data (Ha/MT) Data Data Data Data Data Area Planted 431 431 431 473 480 Area Harvested 431 431 431 473 480 Bearing Trees 0 0 0 Non-Bearing Trees 0 0 0 Total Trees 0 0 0 0 0 Commercial Production 14,000 14,054 14,100 14,100 15,000 Non-Comm. Production 200 200 200 200 200 Production 14,200 14,254 14,300 14,300 15,200 Imports 3,710 3,523 3,500 3,600 3,000 Total Supply 17,910 17,777 17,800 17,900 18,200 Fresh Dom. Consumption 10,334 10,300 10,300 10,400 10,400 Exports 5,076 5,027 5,000 4,400 5,200 For Processing 2,500 2,450 2,500 3,100 2,600 Withdrawal From Market 0 0 0 Total Distribution 17,910 17,777 17,800 17,900 18,200 TS=TD 0 0 0 Note: Data included in this report is not official USDA data. Official data can be found at http://www.fas.usda.gov/psd Note: Marketing Year 2011 is from Oct 1, 2011 to Sep 30, 2012 and will be referred to as 2011/2012 in the text. Similarly MY 2010 is shown as 2010/11 Note: A TCE stands for Tray Carton Equivalent and is 18.0 kilograms of fruit Production Planted Area 2011/2012 Preliminary reports indicate that total apple and pear planted area has stabilized. Total planted area in 2011/12 is forecast at 8,800 ha, a decline of only 63 ha from last year. Over the longer term there is likely to be more pressure for apple tree removal unless grower returns improve, or unless the sector continues to restructure and coalesce around the integrated fruit companies who may lease or purchase orchards to maintain fruit supply to their packing and exporting arms. 2010/11 Post?s estimates have been adjusted downward and brought into line with those reported by PipfruitNZs as its been determined that PipfruitNZ?s orchard survey includes total area planted with deciduous fruit trees, and is not (as previous assumed) limited to reporting on area producing for export. Consequently, Post has amended the PSD numbers for planted area and for timing differences as to which planted area refers to the correct PSD crop year. Table of Deciduous Fruit Plantings in New Zealand by Variety ( in Hectares) M MY20 MY20 MY20 MY20 MY20 MY20 MY20 MY20 MY20 MY20arket Year 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Calendar Yr of H 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 arvest Braeburn 3,632 3,767 3,901 3,159 2,464 2,484 2246 2034 1,869 1740 Royal Gala 3,749 4,010 4,153 3,393 2,872 2,893 2669 2538 2,417 2423 Cox 557 401 354 314 295 281 248 236 Fuji 1,054 1,094 1,133 1,018 875 836 829 899 931 970 Granny Smith 317 374 322 294 286 282 267 256 Cripps Pink/Pink 241 349 287 248 285 353 397 434 Lady Jazz 127 289 440 576 768 917 977 983 Pacific series 1,713 1,094 1,133 1,521 1,198 929 828 793 814 817 Other 315 2,184 2,264 257 184 192 333 388 712 611 Varieties/Uniden tified Total Apple Area 11,70 12,14 12,58 10,76 8,996 8,766 8,539 8,485 8,632 8,470 5 9 4 1 Pears 965 910 910 936 722 735 412 412 431 473 Total 12,67 13,05 13,49 11,69 9,718 9,501 8,951 8,897 9,063 8,943 0 9 4 7 Braeburn as % of 31.0% 31.0% 31.0% 29.4% 27.4% 28.3% 26.3% 24.0% 21.7% 20.5% Apple Area Royal Gala as a % 32.0% 33.0% 33.0% 31.5% 31.9% 33.0% 31.3% 29.9% 28.0% 28.6% of Apple Area Source: PipfruitNZ Organic Area In 2010/2011 the total area in organics was estimated at 947 ha, 11% of total area. Of that, 82 ha was in the transition phase to achieving full organic certification. This was down from the 2009/10 level when a total of 976 ha were recorded as organic. The organic area peaked 2008/09 at 1,004 ha. It has been reported that one of the large integrated apple and pear growing, packing, and exporting companies is going to substantially reduce its organic area. In contrast to the decline in certified organic area, the area planted in the ?Apple Futures? program (which aims to achieve nil detectable chemical residues by whatever growing methods are most applicable), now comprises 63% of the total planted area, up from 1% in 2006/2007. Apple Production 2011/2012 With harvested area being very similar to 2010/11 and at this stage no serious weather concerns, it is envisaged that with a slight down year caused by biennial bearing influences, total apple production will be 472,400 metric tons, down 2% from the previous year. 2010/2011 Apple production for 2010/2011 is estimated at 479,740 tons, up 1% from Post?s earlier estimate. This would put the 2010/2011 crop up 9% from the previous year which suffered from hail damage and a biennial bearing down year. 2009/2010 Total production for MY2009 has been revised up to 429,000 metric tons after better background information became available to Post Pear Production 2010/11 As the increase in planted area starts to reach fruition it is projected that total production will reach 15,200 metric tons, 6% higher than the previous year. Grower Returns Apple Prices in NZ$ per Tray Carton Equivalent(18kg) on a Free Alongside Ship Basis for Marketing Year(FAS-USDA) Marketing Year 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Variety/Growing Method Braeburn- Integrated Fruit Program 15.11 9.81 19.42 16.29 25.09 16.13 18.25 Royal Gala- IFP 16.73 13.87 19.26 19.13 22.16 21.11 22.90 Jazz- IFP 37.39 31.81 34.24 29.57 30.98 19.46 21.59 Granny Smith -IFP 16.69 11.46 19.85 16.48 21.64 19.20 21.68 Cripps Pink/Pink Lady- IFP 27.17 22.72 26.56 25.8 32.12 26.71 21.60 Fuji- IFP 19.98 18.13 27.06 24.01 26.10 25.53 25.71 Pacific Beauty 17.86 17.80 17.02 21.95 23.05 32.47 27.59 Pacific Queen 16.03 17.36 22.26 23.63 26.20 35.19 33.47 Pacific Rose 12.66 16.51 19.42 20.9 25.37 27.29 30.72 Organically grown Braeburn 48.17 30.75 35.14 17.43 25.69 All Organic Apples 32.45 36.03 21.15 27.35 Average All IFP Apples 15.55 12.88 20.02 19.06 24.44 20.52 22.22 Breakeven Costs 23.00 20.35 22.57 Source: PipfruitNZ/MAF Note: The Breakeven costs includes all on orchard costs, and grading, packing, coolstorage, and freight plus depreciation but no rent or interest costs. 2010/2011 Final grower returns in 2010/2011 are not known yet but anecdotal reports suggest that in-market prices were similar or perhaps a slightly better than the previous export campaign. Final returns are preliminarily estimated at NZ$20-21/TCE. Again it is likely Braeburn will return a sub-par NZ$20/TCE average price level. Even more disappointing is the newly introduced Jazz variety which isn?t grown in significant quantities anywhere in the world, but will record the 3rd year consecutive year of below cost returns at NZ$18.50-19/TCE. Growers who spent considerable sums of money redeveloping their orchards planting the Jazz variety are now questioning their judgment. Some growers may lose the support of their bankers especially in the Nelson region. A bright spot this season was the demand for the Pacific series of cultivars which are likely to yield returns in the NZ$26-31/TCE range. The Pacific series were in strong demand from China and Taiwan. The MAF Horticultural Monitoring Program forecasts growers? breakeven costs will average NZ$20.60/TCE which is a 10% reduction from the previous year and may enable growers of varieties in greater demand (e.g., the Pacific series, Fuji, and Royal Gala apples) to realize some profits. It is important to note the savviest of Braeburn growers can get their costs down to around NZ$15/TCE, and so they would still be making a profit at grower returns of NZ$18-19/TCE for Braeburn. Many Nelson orchardists will suffer the third significant financial loss in a row. This has prompted them to start looking at ways to collaborate to improve their prospects. The Regional Economic Development Agency is helping facilitate any work which may involve growers banding together to export their own fruit. Source: Reserve Bank of NZ Consumption No material change is expected for domestic consumption of either apples or pears in MY 2011 in relation to MY2010. Trade Apple Exports 2011/2012 Post estimates MY 2011 apple exports at 287,000 tons, down 9,000 tons (3%) from the estimated 296,000 tons exported in MY2010. This is in line with the forecast for a slight production drop and the anticipated increase in apples diverted to domestic processing. 2010/2011 In response to actual exports of 295,000 tons with only 1 month of the marketing year to go, Post has revised the estimate for MY2010 exports up by 1.4% to 296,000 tons, which is 14% higher than the previous year. New Zealand Apple Export Statistics Compoun Year Ending Series: August 31, 2001 - 2011 d rate of change Quantity(metric tons) 2001 Partner 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Country to 2011 World Total 2 6 2 9 9 3 318 73 7 321 79 1 358 52 9 318 91 9 265 41 6 291 65 8 2 6 1 6 0 8 302 18 0 2 5 7 9 4 7 297 40 8 1.2% Total EU excl UK 95699 124444 130598 163219 160886 112240 113494 99134 116452 94619 104357 0.9% United Kingdom 67067 72728 73591 78453 66059 59146 63111 43526 50286 36150 46149 -3.7% United States 49647 58445 49158 56376 32413 37517 47700 33028 45484 42260 33107 -4.0% Taiwan 5660 13818 14434 19340 25825 15204 18263 20598 16349 15756 18133 12.3% Hong Kong 12626 7699 11121 6782 4794 5583 6323 8179 13351 10760 16157 2.5% Thailand 2614 2142 3387 1082 840 2219 3035 7539 8844 12317 14314 18.5% India 1757 2477 2705 2477 2501 3882 3675 4966 5331 5854 11928 21.1% UAE 1961 3595 1981 2033 2577 2727 4591 6166 8962 7064 8083 15.2% Malaysia 7183 10431 8252 6229 3645 4493 5350 6997 6894 3468 6277 -1.3% Singapore 6326 9037 7699 5507 3591 4722 4819 5744 5853 4474 5954 -0.6% Rest of world 12451 13921 18867 17031 15789 17685 21298 25728 24373 25226 32950 10.2% Source: Global Trade Atlas & Post Source: GTA Source: GTA The export matrix detailed in the table above and the snapshots of destination export shares reflected in the pie charts illustrates the gradual shift of industry focus to the Pacific Rim, Asia, and Middle East countries. Several factors are driving this: A rapidly growing proportion of the population in Asia and the Middle East with disposable income to spend on, high-quality fruit Generally better market prices Lower shipping costs and time The table detailing grower returns for the various apple varieties reveals that varieties destined for the Asian markets (e.g., Fuji, the Pacific series, and now a significant proportion of the Royal Gala crop) are yielding better returns for growers on a sustained basis. The Braeburn and Jazz apple varieties are not well suited to the Asian markets which generally prefer a sweeter apple. There are constraints and issues with developing new markets in Asia: Tariff levels (India especially) SPS issues which are more concerned with insect and disease control rather than MRL?s in the EU Well planned marketing campaigns need to be implemented so as not to collapse any particular market with an oversupply. The markets in Asia generally demand a sweet apple with a high red color rather than the russet marking of the Braeburn and its relative the Jazz, which are both tart in taste. The cost and risk of growers re-developing orchards over to either new varieties or the Royal Gala North America The US continues to be an important market for NZ apples, although for exports through August 31, 2011, shipments were down 22% at 33,107 tons, compared with exports to all destinations up 15% for the same period. Reportedly the US market still demands large fruit sizes, and this year?s pricing has been extremely volatile from week to week. In the long term, traders maintain that a strong US market for a portion of the NZ apple crop will be crucial to maximizing returns. Australia The WTO case filed by NZ against Australia (over the perceived threat of firebight being imported to Australia through imports of NZ apples) was resolved in favor of NZ in late 2010. Work by the respective competent authorities got under way quickly to compile the risk analysis and compliance program. The final importing protocol was issued on August 17, 2010 and by August 19 the first shipment was on its way to Sydney. It is worth noting that New Zealand has exported apples to Taiwan and India for many years, both of which don?t have fireblight. Trade with Australia has, however, not been easy; the protocol establishes very high compliance requirements. By mid-October, 17 tons of fruit had been inspected prior to shipment to Australia, of which 5 tons were rejected. The problems found included vegetative residue in the cartons and the discovery of banned insects. The protocol is similar in its requirements to those for shipments destined for Taiwan. Industry participants maintain that the pack houses will need to regard Australia has having similar requirements and standards as those evident in the most particular of Asian destinations, and adjust their systems accordingly. Growers will likely have to target the Australian market right from the beginning of the growing season and adjust their management practices to suit. In this respect it will be similar to markets such as Taiwan and China which require orchardists to adjust their management right from the onset of the growing season in order to meet phyto-sanitary requirements. There may be an upside to the stringency of the protocol in that it will naturally limit the volume of fruit shipped to Australia for a couple of seasons and thereby allow a more orderly development of the market by New Zealand exporters. PipfruitNZ does not anticipate the market for NZ apples in Australia to be much greater than 9,000 tons of fruit in the nearer term. A report commissioned within Australia reported that if NZ apples entered the Australian market, consumption of apples would increase by 17% but prices would fall. Asia A highlight for the season was the demand for the Pacific Series in Taiwan and Hong Kong which really took off. Grower returns are likely to be at least as good as last year even with the appreciating exchange rate. Prices could have been even higher but exporters ran out of fruit. NZ is really the only significant producer of the Pacific series and consequently has the market virtually to itself. These apples are more difficult to grow and productivity is lower than the main varieties of Braeburn and Royal Gala. It is thought that to exploit the promise of the Asian markets more fully, post harvest operators will need to invest more in controlled atmosphere storage facilities. The Asian markets often pay the best prices early in the NZ exporting season and then again late in the season. India Despite a tariff of close to 50%, apple exports from NZ to India have grown at a rate of 20% per year over the last 10 years. In fact exports for the year to August 2011 have more than doubled when compared to the previous year. Royal Gala, Red Delicious, and Pacific Queen are the main varieties exported. Promotional activities have involved NZ cricketing greats which resonate well in India where cricket is the national game. NZ is currently negotiating a Free Trade Agreement with India which could be concluded next year. If a satisfactory tariff reduction schedule for apples from NZ is obtained this will further stimulate the trade and help move the focus of the sector more fully onto Asia. Europe / Braeburn Exporters Group The Braeburn exporters group is a voluntary grouping which meets on a regular basis to share market data and discuss strategy. They have also engaged a skilled marketer who has directed the limited marketing budget to an interactive website and a social media campaign (see: http://www.applesfromnz.com/#/About-us). Promotional activities have involved leaving cartons of NZ apples in London parks with flyers directing the public who have tasted the apples to the website. It is not known at this stage whether the Exporters group has had a positive effect on grower returns this season. The European market for Braeburn was more stable this year and the hard issues around volume control when the market is falling haven?t surfaced this year. The big problem faced by Braeburn producers is really that they are being displaced by the Jazz and Cripps Pink volumes from NZ and elsewhere. New Zealand Export Destination Statistics For Fresh Apples Market Year Ending: September, 2005 - 2010 Share of Partner Quantity (metric tons) % Exports Co change 2010 untry 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 over 2009 in 2010 Total EU excl UK 160886 112240 113494 99134 116452 94619 -18.7% 36.5% United States 32455 37578 47669 32958 45678 42108 -7.8% 16.3% United Kingdom 66059 59181 63076 43526 50286 36297 -27.8% 14.0% Taiwan 25762 15204 18283 20599 16450 15634 -5.0% 6.0% Thailand 840 2219 3160 7435 9085 12860 41.6% 5.0% Hong Kong 4769 5583 6341 8160 13454 10935 -18.7% 4.2% United Arab Emirates 2577 2727 4591 6166 8962 7148 -20.2% 2.8% India 2522 3861 3675 4966 5331 6058 13.6% 2.3% Canada 4135 4951 6177 5613 4770 5810 21.8% 2.2% Singapore 3637 4680 4824 5736 5894 4517 -23.4% 1.7% All Other Destinations 15213 17317 20730 26861 26654 22996 -13.7% 8.9% World Total 318855 265541 292020 261154 303016 258982 -14.5% 100.0% Source: Global Trade Atlas Apple Imports New Zealand Import Statistics Commodity: 080810, Apples, Fresh Year Ending Series: August 31, 2006 - 2011 Quantity % share Partner Country Unit 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2011 World T 1235 1102 1572 1654 1353 1257 United States T 1169 1082 1572 1613 1217 1240 98.6% New Zealand T 64 0 0 41 125 17 1.4% Australia T 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Canada T 0 20 0 0 0 0 0.0% China T 0 0 0 0 11 0 0.0% India T 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% United Kingdom T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Source: Global Trade Atlas Pear Exports A total production increase and a return to a normal export packout should see pear exports rebound to 5,200 tons in MY 2011 up from an estimated 4,400 tons in MY 2010. Pear Imports New Zealand Import Statistics Commodity: 080820, Pears And Quinces, Fresh Year Ending Series: August 31, 2006 - 2011 Quantity % share Partner Country Unit 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2011 World T 3880 3161 3089 3520 3505 3545 United States T 1212 1362 1127 1223 1340 1689 47.6% Australia T 1493 1200 1145 1530 1677 1233 34.8% China T 993 507 674 593 300 506 14.3% Korea South T 161 92 143 174 162 117 3.3% Canada T 21 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% New Zealand T 0 0 0 0 4 0 0.0% South Africa T 0 0 0 0 22 0 0.0% Source: Global Trade Atlas Policy China New Zealand has finally managed to negotiate a more suitable export protocol with the Chinese mainland for apples. Once New Zealand?s WTO case with Australia was concluded a new protocol for fireblight risk was agreed to with China along with a change in stance in terms of China?s response if one of the quarantine list of pests is found in a shipment. Agreement was reached on the protocol in February 2011 and signed September 28, 2011. The protocol is similar to the one with Taiwan. The risk of fireblight is controlled by the Integrated Pest Management strategy adopted by growers, and MAF certify the fruit is free of fireblight. In regard to other pests and diseases on China?s quarantine pest list such as Woolley Apple Aphid, Scab, Apple leaf Curling Midge, and San Jose scab; if a pest is found in a particular shipment rather than the draconian step of banning all further shipments a problem solving pathway will be adopted so as to maintain trade. Access directly to the mainland rather than via the grey trade with Hong Kong will extend the reach of apple exports from New Zealand and open up new regional markets such as Shanghai. It will save exporters approximately NZ$2.00-3.00/TCE of additional trans shipping costs. Direct shipments to Chinese mainland ports could reach 10,000 to 20,000 tons in a matter of four to six years. Japan In mid 2010 Japanese authorities came to an agreement with MAF over a protocol for apple imports that would allay Japanese fears of fireblight. Shipments of apples are fumigated with methyl bromide in NZ and held for 22 days in cold storage before shipping. Rather than have a Japanese official oversee the whole process, a Japanese inspector will now audit the system once a year. It?s too early to tell whether these changes will be enough to stimulate a growth in shipments to this market above the 140 tons shipped in the last 12 months. Free Trade Agreements The following agreements are in force: New Zealand-Hong Kong, China Closer Economic Partnership (NZ-HK CEP entered into force on 1 January 2011) New Zealand-Malaysia Free Trade Agreement (MNZFTA entered into force on 1 August 2010) ASEAN-Australia-New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (AANZFTA) - 2010 New Zealand-China Free Trade Agreement (NZ-China FTA) - 2008 Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership (P4) - 2005 New Zealand-Thailand Closer Economic Partnership (NZTCEP) - 2005 New Zealand-Singapore Closer Economic Partnership (NZSCEP) - 2001 Australia-New Zealand Closer Economic Relationship (CER) - 1983 In addition, the New Zealand Government is currently negotiating the following FTAs: New Zealand-Gulf Cooperation Council Free Trade Agreement (NZ-GCC FTA negotiations have been concluded but not yet signed) Expansion of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership (TPP) New Zealand-Korea Free Trade Agreement (NZ-Korea FTA) New Zealand-India Free Trade Agreement (NZ-India FTA) New Zealand-Russia-Belarus-Kazakhstan Free Trade Agreement (NZ-RBK) While exporters report that FTAs do not drive business decisions, they do provide a framework to work out trade-related issues, especially SPS and non-tariff barriers, and, in some cases, significant market access advantages. Also announced negotiations are beginning with Taiwan Industry Developments Industry News A majority stake in the largest post harvest operator, processor and exporter, Turners and Growers (T&G) which owns ENZA and exports somewhere around 20% of the apple crop is up for sale. ENZA owns the Jazz and Envy varieties and is the largest juicing processor. Depending on how this stake is sold it could set the scene for structural changes within the sector.
Posted: 27 November 2011

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