Agricultural Biotechnology Annual 2012

An Expert's View about Crops and Support Services in the Philippines

Posted on: 30 Sep 2012

The Philippines remains a regional biotechnology leader and continues to be looked up to for guidance on biotechnology policy by other developing countries.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: GAIN Report Number: Philippines Agricultural Biotechnology Annual Philippine Biotechnology Situation and Outlook Approved By: William Verzani Prepared By: Perfecto G. Corpuz Report Highlights: The Philippines remains a regional biotechnology leader and continues to be looked up to for guidance on biotechnology policy by other developing countries. Under the Philippines regulatory regime, 32 transformation events and 28 stacked-trait products have been approved for direct use as food, feed or for propagation. Genetically modified (GM) corn was planted on 27% (685,000 hectares) of the total Philippine corn area by an estimated 300,000 farmers in 2011. GM corn area and the number of farmers are likely to increase again in 2012 as the benefits and profits of GM technology become more apparent. There were no biotechnology-related trade disruptions in 2011. 2011 U.S. exports of GE products (e.g. soybean meal, feeds and fodders, etc.) to the Philippines grew by eight percent to reach $527 million. Commercialization of Bt eggplant is on track for 2013, and Golden Rice field tests are likely to be completed during the same year. Some international anti-GMO groups stepped up activities in the Philippines in 2011, including efforts to pass a mandatory GMO-labeling bill and block commercialization of Bt eggplant and Golden Rice. Some analysts attribute this intensified focus to fears that commercialization of GM products that bring clear consumer benefits could undermine their efforts to ban GMOs in other markets. Section I. Executive Summary: The Philippine biotechnology regulatory system continues to remain science-based. Under the current regulatory regime as provided for by the Philippine Department of Agriculture’s Administrative Order No. 8 (DA-AO 8), 32 transformation events (TEs) and 28 stacked-trait products are approved for direct use as food, feed or for propagation. There are eight (8) biotech crop varieties approved for propagation while 17 field tests have been allowed since 2004. The adoption by Filipino farmers of GM corn for propagation continues to be dramatic. From nearly 11,000 hectares in 2003, the area devoted to GM corn has increased to over 685,000 hectares in 2011. GM corn area harvested accounted for roughly 27 percent or over a 4th of overall Philippine corn area. The increasing GM corn trend mirrors overall Philippine corn production which has consistently reached record-levels in recent years. Roughly 300,000 Filipino corn farmers now use GM corn varieties. Increasingly becoming more aware, farmers using conventional varieties are asking for greater access to GM corn seeds. Guided by DA-AO 8, the first genetically modified (GM) crop being developed locally, the Fruit and Shoot Borer Resistant (FSBR) or Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) eggplant, will likely be commercialized by 2013. Completed multi-location trials of Golden Rice are also expected by 2013. U.S. agricultural exports to the Philippines with possible derivation from modern agricultural biotechnology continued to grow in 2011. U.S. exports to the Philippines increased more than 265 percent from $142 million in 2003 to $527 million in 2011. Soybean-based products from the U.S. accounted for the majority share (67 percent) of overall GM product exports in 2011, followed by feeds and fodder (17 percent). Some international anti-GMO groups stepped up activities in the Philippines in 2011, including efforts to pass a mandatory GMO-labeling bill and block commercialization of Bt eggplant and Golden Rice. Some analysts attribute this intensified focus to fears that commercialization of GM products that bring clear consumer benefits could undermine their efforts to ban GMOs in other markets. Section II. Plant Biotechnology Trade and Production: As of June 7, 2012, there were eight (8) GM crop varieties approved for commercial production, unchanged from the previous year’s level. This consisted of five (5) TEs and three (3) stacked or combined trait products (refer to Annex I and Annex II respectively). All the GM crop varieties approved for propagation were corn. The promise of substantial yield improvements combined with the country’s limited area of production has resulted in a significant adoption rate of GM corn in the Philippines. From nearly 11,000 hectares in 2003, the area devoted to GM corn dramatically increased to over 685,000 hectares in 2011, according to data from the Philippine Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI). GM corn accounted for roughly 27 percent or over a 4th of all Philippine corn areas (2.5 million hectares) in 2011, compared to an estimated 22 percent share in 2010. Corn: Philippine Production, Area Harvested & Yield 2003-2011 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 National Prod'n (KMT) 4,615.,63 5,413.39 5,253.16 6,082.11 6,736.94 6,928.23 7,034.03 6,376.80 6,971.22 Total Area (KHas.) 2,409.83 2,527.14 2,441.79 2,570.67 2,648.32 2,661.02 2,683.89 2,499.04 2,544.61 Yield (MT/Has.) 1.92 2.14 2.15 2.37 2.54 2.60 2.62 2.55 2.74 GM Corn Area (KHas.) 10.769 59.756 50.009 127.873 313.895 347.575 327.226 542.522 685.372 % GM/Total Area (Has.) 0.45 2.36 2.05 4.97 11.85 13.06 12.19 21.71 26.93 Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics & Bureau of Plant Industry About 70 percent of all GM corn planted in 2011 was located in the main island of Luzon, followed by Mindanao island with approximately a 27 percent share. Stacked trait GM corn varieties accounted for over 90 percent of all GM varieties in 2011. Making its debut in 2011 were pyramided corn varieties. Adequate rainfall in 2012 is likely to encourage more corn production and increased use of GM corn seed during the year. The following is a table on GM corn area for each island grouping from 2003 to 2011. AGGREGATE DATA OF GM CORN 2003-2011 (Hectares) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Bt Corn LUZON 10,158 48,516 43,735 85,702 103,438 68,301 38,507 37,115 19,331 VISAYAS 24 534 445 405 2,551 298 0 0 0 MINDANAO 587 10,706 5,829 10,693 16,604 13,053 9,516 3,120 1,874 Total 10,769 59,756 50,009 96,800 122,593 81,652 48,023 40,235 21,205 RR Corn LUZON 0 0 0 11,685 54,509 5,471 3,518 642 4,295 VISAYAS 0 0 0 4,424 8,925 4,571 2,790 0 800 MINDANAO 0 0 0 10,384 56,589 41,443 40,501 8,048 9,943 Total 0 0 0 26,493 120,023 51,485 46,809 8,690 15,038 Stacked (Bt + RR) LUZON 0 0 0 3,879 59,346 158,520 183,771 373,079 452,730 VISAYAS 0 0 0 232 2,472 7,074 8,006 5,366 17,011 MINDANAO 0 0 0 469 9,461 48,844 40,618 115,153 173,924 Total 0 0 0 4,580 71,279 214,438 232,395 493,598 643,665 Pyramided LUZON 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4,537 VISAYAS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 922 MINDANAO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5,464 GRAND TOTAL 10,769 59,756 50,009 127,873 313,895 347,575 327,226 542,522 685,372 *Bt –Bacillus thuringiensis *RR – Roundup Ready Source: Bureau of Plant Industry Philippine corn farmers have benefitted from the use of GM corn. In a study on Bt corn by a local economist, it was found that Bt corn farmers earned 38 percent more than non-Bt corn farmers. The same study also reports that the cost of production was reduced by as much as P0.23/kilogram. Currently, there are roughly 300,000 GM corn farmers in the Philippines, considerably higher than the estimated 10,000 farmers in 2003. The use of Bt corn reportedly has had no negative effect on insect populations in Bt corn fields (Reyes, 2004) and minimizes the use of harmful chemical insecticides/pesticides. Additionally, zero tillage technologies, such as in some GM corn varieties, helps conserve soil and water resources. The latest list of regulated articles approved for field testing in the Philippines is provided in the following table. As of June 2012, there were 17 GM crop field trials approved, (i.e., 13 corn, 1 papaya, 1 cotton, 1 rice and 1 eggplant field tests), up from 13 recorded in the previous annual report. APPROVAL REGISTRY FOR FIELD TESTING of REGULATED ARTICLES as of June 7, 2012 Proposal Technology Developer Date Approved 1. Demonstration of Weed Control Monsanto 11/26/04 Performance of Roundup Ready Corn (RRC) System DK818 NK603 vis-à-vis Farmers' Practices 2. Performance of Roundup Herbicide Monsanto 11/26/04 (360 g ae/L IPA Salt) Against Weeds in Glyphosate-Tolerant Corn 3. Field Verification of the Agronomic Monsanto 12/10/04 Performance of the Transgenic Corn (zea mays L.) Hybrid Stacked (NK603/MON 810) Expressing the Bacillus Thuringiensis Cry1AB Protein for Resistance Against the Asiatic Corn Borer (Ostrinia fumacalis Guenee) and CP4 EPSPS for Tolerance Against the Herbicide Roundup 4. Performance of Heculex 1 Bt Transgenic Corn Dow Sciences 05/02/06 Hybrids against Asiatic Corn Borer (Ostrinia fumacalis Guenee) under field conditions in the Philippines 5. Field Testing of Transgenic Papaya with delayed University of the Philippines 03/20/07 Ripening Trait at Los Banos 6. Multi-location Field Efficacy Verification Trial of Herbicide Tolerant Maize Expressing Event GA21 Syngenta 11/19/07 Against Glyphosate Herbicide in the Philippines 7. Agronomic Equivalency Trial of MON89034 Monsanto 08/01/08 Hybrids with Regulatory Framework in the Philippines 8. Field Verification of the Agronomic Performance Monsanto 08/01/08 of Transgenic Corn (Zea mays L.) line MON89034 Expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab Proteins for Efficacy Against Lepidopterous Pests of Corn 9. Field Verification of the Agronomic Performance Monsanto 08/01/08 of Stacked Hybrid Corn (Zea mays L.) MON89034 x NK603 Expressing the Bacillus Thuringiensis Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 Proteins for Efficacy against Lepitopterous Pests of Corn and CP4EPSPS for tolerance of Roundup Herbicide 10. Multi-location Field Efficacy Trial of Corn Hybrid Syngenta 10/28/09 Expressing the Stacked Trait Bt11 x GA21 Against the Asiatic Corn Borer and Glyphosate Herbicide in the Philippines 11. Development and Commercialization of Philippine University of the Philippines 3/16/2010 & Fruit and Shoot Borer Resistant Eggplants Containing at Los Banos 06/28/10 MAHYCO Bt eggplant event, EE-1. Multilocation Field Trials for Biosafety Assessment, Variety Renewed to 3/15/13 Accreditation and Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority & 06/2713 Registration 12. Field verification of the Agronomic Performance of Pioneer Hi-Bred 04/01/11 Transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) Line TC1507 Expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Proteins for Efficacy Against Asiatic Corn Borer and the PAT Proteins for tolerance to Glufosinate Herbicide. 13. Field verification of the Agronomic Performance of Pioneer Hi-Bred 04/19/11 Transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) Hybrid Stacked (TC1507 x MON810 x NK603) Expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Proteins for Efficacy Against Asiatic Corn Borer and the PAT Proteins and CP4-EPSPS for tolerance to Glufosinate and Glyphosate Herbicides. 14. Field Efficacy Verification Trial of Corn Hybrids Syngenta 07/13/11 Expressing Event MIR162 against lepidoteran insect pests. 15. Field Efficacy Verification Trial of Corn Hybrids Syngenta 07/13/11 Expressing Event Bt11 x MIR 162 x GA21 against lepidopteran insect pests and glyphosate herbicide. 16. Multi-location Field Trial of Beta Carotene Philippine Rice 02/16/12 Enriched 'Golden Rice' event GR2-R in the Philippines. Research Institute 17. Multi-Location Field Test of Transgenic Cotton Gossypium hirsutum L., Varieties with the Bt fusion Cotton Development 03/16/12 gene cry 1Ab-Ac (GFM cry 1A) against Cotton Bollworm Administration (Helicoverpa armigera Hubn.) Source: Bureau of Plant Industry The multi-location trials of the FSBR eggplant (# 11) by the University of the Philippines at Los Banos are expected to produce the first commercialized GM crop in the country. The harvest of the last required field test took place on July 10, 2012. The results of the tests are expected to confirm the efficacy of Bt eggplant against the fruit-and-shoot borer as well as its safety in respect to non-target organisms. Bt eggplant is on track to be approved in 2013. As eggplant is an important Philippine vegetable in terms of production area (21,299 hectares) with volume valued at PhP3.4 billion (BAS, 2008), Bt eggplant has the following potential impacts (according to the DA): Increase in marketable harvest by 40 percent Reduction in pesticide usage by as much as 48 percent Increase in farmer’s income by PhP50,000 per hectare Cheaper eggplants with lower insecticide residue Despite the potential benefits above, anti-GMO activist groups have intensified their efforts to derail Bt eggplant’s commercialization (see Section V). For Vitamin A-enriched and virus-resistant rice (aka Golden Rice # 16), the last harvest of the required field trial for this season was concluded on July 12-13, 2012. Another field test (for the wet season) will still have to be undertaken before it will be considered for commercial planting. The granting of the corresponding permit, however, does not necessarily mean commercial propagation will immediately commence. To ensure optimum results are achieved, bio-efficacy studies are still likely to be pursued. In the Philippines, 15% of children between 6 months and 5 years old, 9.5% of pregnant women and 6.4% of lactating women are vitamin A deficient. According to the DA, the commercialization of Golden Rice will not only increase rice yields but will also address key nutritional deficiencies in the country. The country’s existing biotechnology regulations have also kept agricultural trade flowing. The following table shows U.S. agricultural exports to the Philippines that possibly were derived from modern agricultural biotechnology from 2003-2011. U.S. exports to the Philippines increased more than 265 percent from $142 million in 2003 to $527 million in 2011. Soybean-based products accounted for the majority share (67 percent) of GM product exports in 2011, followed by feeds and fodder (17 percent). CY US Exports to the Philippines (In Thousand $) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Soybean Meal 56,658 75,049 119,829 123,329 189,872 243,909 317,075 325,917 315,401 Feeds & Fodders 9,224 13,690 17,899 33,265 41,715 53,026 50,376 72,286 91,802 Soybeans 41,872 51,831 48,042 25,525 26,814 26,297 24,761 30,261 35,571 Sweeteners 10,071 7,400 5,431 9,842 11,492 15,751 11,287 41,950 55,685 Coarse Grains 148 214 14,179 192 776 802 3,922 842 818 Cotton 21,073 32,080 19,836 13,295 11,232 8,360 19,187 13,922 19,943 Vegetable Oil* 3,071 3,733 3,347 3,506 4,694 4,756 4,689 5,971 6,644 Soybean Oil 82 148 105 138 115 1,020 825 650 1,277 TOTALS 142,199 184,145 228,668 209,092 286,710 353921 432,122 491,799 527,141 Source: BICO Section III. Plant Biotechnology Policy: The Philippine agricultural biotechnology regulatory regime is embodied in the DA-AO 8. The responsible Philippine government regulatory agencies and their roles in relation to Philippine biotechnology regulations remain unchanged as reported in the previous annual reports. The BPI continues to be the lead-agency in implementing the science-based DA-AO 8. Under the current regulations, 32 TEs have been approved for food, feed or processing materials (see Annex I), marginally higher than the 31 approved TEs posted in the previous annual report. In addition, there were 28 approved stacked trait products as of June 7, 2012, slightly higher than the 27 approved products cited in the previous annual report. A summary of approved stacked or combined trait products is provided in Annex II. On May 8, 2012, the DA issued Memorandum Circular No. 3 (MO 3) or the New Directive on Insect Resistance Management (IRM) in Bt Corn (Attached). Effective September 1, 2012, MO 3 implements the bag-in-a-bag structured refuge strategy by requiring all technology developers and seed developers to package 20 percent non-Bt Corn seeds inside the larger Bt Corn seed bag. The Philippine DA held sector consultations on proposed low level presence (LLP) guidelines in late 2011. Stakeholders expressed opposition to some provisions which would have required documentation they considered burdensome and unnecessary. Specifically, concerns were raised on the documentation requirements needed to obtain a Certificate of Safety and a proposed 4 percent non-commercial percentage as an LLP threshold of GM material in shipments. The DA agreed to revise the draft in consideration of the points raised from local stakeholders (the forthcoming revised draft will also likely include points raised at the March 2012 meeting in Vancouver, Canada on Low Level Presence). GM labeling bills have consistently been filed in the Philippine Congress starting in 2003, or shortly after the time DA AO 8 was approved. In October 2011, the Committee on Trade and Industry of the Philippine House of Representatives conducted hearings to finalize the crafting of a substitute bill that would consolidate several labeling-related measures. The resulting substitute bill (aka the GM labeling bill) calls for the labeling of all food products derived from GM materials, including highly processed foods (where the GM protein can no longer be detected by lab testing) and even poultry and livestock where the live animals may have been fed GM feed. Many industry analysts do not expect the bill to prosper. Section IV. Plant Biotechnology Marketing Issues: The overall support on the responsible use of modern agricultural biotechnology remains strong although there are pockets of resistance. Some local governments continue to maintain resolutions/statements that restrict GM crop testing and/or cultivation (see Section V). This is particularly the case with GM corn. Many farmer groups in these regions, however, want better access to GM seeds. Biotechnology outreach programs initiated by the private sector, seek to overturn these prohibitions. Section V. Plant Biotechnology Capacity Building and Outreach: The Philippines continues to be looked upon for guidance on biotechnology policy and regulations by other developing counties. The country has likewise been a venue for GM technology-related international events. Filipino scientists are also often invited to participate as resource speakers in international biotechnology forums abroad. Supported by funding from the USDA’s Emerging Market Program (EMP), the DA-BPI held a symposium/workshop on “New Developments of GM Crop Farming” on April 3-4, 2012. The symposium coincided with the 10 year anniversary of the Philippines Biotechnology Regulatory System. In attendance during both days were over 170 regulators, scientists, researchers, policy decision-makers, technology developers, seed companies, and academia. By increasing Filipino regulators’ ability to assess emerging biotech traits, this type of workshop places the Philippines in a better position to strengthen its role as a regional leader in food security and climate change adaptation. On April 26, 2012, an international anti-GMO group and a number of Filipino artists and environmentalists petitioned the Philippine Supreme Court to halt testing of Bt eggplant nationwide. Pro-biotechnology NGOs, academics, and the DA worked to compile a response to this request. The Supreme Court has yet to rule on the petition. Several contacts in the agricultural sector characterized the latest anti-GMO activism as an act of desperation, noting that if GM eggplant and Golden Rice achieve commercialization, the widespread economic and health benefits of these crops' would likely render anti-GMO activities moot. Others from the academe welcomed the activism as it provides the opportunity and venue for them to speak out and be heard on the benefits of Bt eggplant. From May 21-25, 2012, supported by the Department of State's Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs, Jefferson Science Fellow and Cornell University professor Peter Davies spoke at 5 events in 3 provinces, met with key public and private sector decision makers, and helped proponents of GM crops maintain the initiative in the Philippine biotechnology debate. In Oriental Mindoro, where a provincial ban on GMOs is in place, Embassy Manila partnered with the National Corn Competitiveness Board, a multinational seed company, and a major Philippines agricultural cooperative to organize a biotechnology symposium for local farmers. In addition to Dr. Davies, the event featured speakers from the DA-BPI who explained the Philippines' stringent biotechnology regulatory system, an overseas worker-turned farmer who attributed her escape from poverty to biotech corn, and a representative from an agricultural cooperative who said the coop. would purchase higher-quality GM corn at higher prices if the provincial ban was lifted. Farmer after farmer asked speakers where they could obtain GM corn seeds, while others wanted to know why the seeds were so expensive. Further discussion revealed that while the farmers were painfully aware of the consequences of the provincial ban on biotech crops -- overpriced and difficult to obtain inputs -- most had no idea there was a ban in place. Section VI. Animal Biotechnology: There are currently no ongoing research and development projects on transgenic animals. The responsible GPH agency for animal biotechnology is the Philippine Carabao (water buffalo) Center, an attached agency of the DA. Section VII. Author Defined: ANNEX I - APPROVAL REGISTRY FOR THE IMPORTATION OF REGULATED ARTICLES FOR DIRECT USE AS FOOD, FEED & FOR PROPAGATION As of June 7, 2012 Introduced Technolo Transformation Trait Date Safety Assessment gy Approve Foo Fee Propagati Event and Gene d d d on Developer 1. Corn MIR604 Contains 10/08/07 x x Syngenta m odified cry3A (mCry3A) from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebriones which confers resistance to corn rootworm 2. Soybean MON 89788 Contains 11/16/07 x x Monsanto cp4epsps coding sequence from Agrobacterium sp Strain, CP4 which confers resistance tolerance to Roundup family of agricultural herbicides 3. Corn MON 810 Contains * x x x Monsanto cry1A(b) gene 12/03/07 from Bacillus Thuringiensis var. kurstaki which confers resistance to corn borer 4. Corn 3272 Expresses a 02/07/08 x x Syngenta synthetic thermostable alpha amylase protein AMY797E that catalyzes the hydrolysis of starch into soluble sugars 5. Corn Bt 11 Contains the * x x x Syngenta cr1Ab gene 07/22/08 from Bacillus & * thuringiensis 4/23/10 and pat gene for from propagati Streptomyces on viridochromoge nes which confer resistance to corn borer tolerance to herbicide, respectively 6. Soybean 40-3-2 Contains * 7/22/08 x x Monsanto cp4epsps coding sequence from Agrobacterium sp. Strain, CP4 which confers resistance tolerance to Roundup family of agricultural herbicides 7. Corn NK 603 Contains * x x x Monsanto cp4epsps 09/10/08 coding & * sequence from 3/16/10 Agrobacterium for sp. CP4 strain propagati which confers on resistance tolerance to Roundup family of agricultural herbicides 8. Corn MON 863 Contains * x x Monsanto cry3Bb1 gene 10/07/08 from Bacillus Thuringiensis subsp kumamotoensis which contains resistance to the corn root worm 9. Corn 1507 Contains cry1F * x x Pioneer B acillus 10/07/08 Hi-Bred thuringiensis (Bt) var. aizawai, and PAT proteins which confer resistance to certain lepidopteran pests such as the Asian corn borer and pin borer (Sesamia spp) 10. Corn DBT 418 Contains * x x Monsanto cry1Ac gene 10/22/08 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp kurstaki and the bar gene from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that confers resistance to lepidopteran insects and tolerance to herbicide phosphinotricin respectively 11. Canola RT 73 Contains * x x Monsanto cp4epsps 10 /22/08 coding sequence from Agrobacterium sp. CP4 strain and the GOXv247 coding sequence from Ochrobactrum anthropi strain LBAA that confers tolerance to the Roundup family of agricultural herbicides 12. Corn BT 176 Contains * x x Syngenta cry1Ab gene 10 /24/08 from Bacillus thuringiensis var kurstaki which confers resistance to lepidopteran insect pest and bar gene from Streptomyces hygroscopicus, which produces an enzyme, phosphinothrici n acetyl transferase (PAT) 13. Corn GA 21 Modified epsps * x x x Monsanto gene from corn 11/20/08 which confers & tolerance to 11/24/09 herbicides for propagati on 14. Corn DLL25 Contains the * x x Monsanto bar gene from 11/20/08 bacterium, Streptomyces hygroscopicus that confers tolerance to herbicide phosphinotricin 15. Corn T25 Contains pat * x x Bayer gene for 12/05/08 Crop Streptomyces Science viridochromoge nes which encodes for tolerance to herbicide , phosphinotricin 16. Cotton 1445 Contains * x x Monsanto cp4epsps 12 /05/08 coding sequence from Agrobacterium sp strain, CP4 which confers tolerance to the Roundup family of agricultural herbicides 17. Cotton 15985 Contains the * x x Monsanto cry2Ab2 and 12/05/08 cry1Ac genes which encode proteins that convey protection from lepidopteran insect pests 18. Potato Bt6 (RBBT02-06) Contains cry IA * x x Monsanto and SPBT02-05 coding 12/05/08 sequence from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp lenebriones for tolerance to Colorado potato beetle 19. Potato RBMT 15-101, Contains cry IA * x x Monsanto SEMT 15-02 and SEMT coding 12/22/08 15-15 sequence from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp lenebriones strain B1256- 82, which confers resistance to Colorado potato beetle and the PVY coat protein (PVYcp) isolated from PVY infected potatoes which confers resistance to the potato virus Y (PVY) 20. Soybean A2704-12 Contains pat 01/23/09 x x Bayer gene which CropScien confers ce tolerance to glufosinate ammonium herbicide 21. Cotton 531 Contains * x x Monsanto cry1Ac gene 02/05/09 from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki which confers resistance to lepidopterous pests 22. Corn MON89034 Contains two 4/29/2009 x x x Monsanto genes & (cry1A.105 and 11/19/10 cry2Ab2) from for Bacillus propagati thuringiensis on which protects the plant from Asiatic corn borer, common cutworm and corn earworm 23. Potato RBMT21-129, Resistance to * x x Monsanto RBMT21-350 and RBMT 22-82 Colorado potato 10/16/09 beetle - CryIIIA coding sequence, Resistance to potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) - PLRV replicase 24. Soybean DP356043 Contains the 11/26/09 x x Pioneer ga t4601 gene Hi-Bred derived from Bacillus licheniformis conferring tolerance to glyphosate and ALS (acetolactate synthase) inhibiting herbicides 25. Corn Contains two 02/11/10 x x Syngenta MIR162 novel genes: vip3Aa20 gene from Bacillus thuringiensis resistance to lepidopteran pests and pmi gene from Escherichia coli encoding the enzyme phosphomanno se isomerase present as a selectable marker 26. Sugar beet Contains * 7/28/10 x x Monsanto H7-1 cp4epsps coding sequence from Agrobacterium sp. CP4 strain, CP4 which confers tolerance to glyphosate 27. Soybean Contains gene 10/29/10 x x BASF CV127 csr-2 from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes the imidazoline herbicide tolerant acetohydroxyaci d synthase (AtAHAS) 28. Cotton Cotton contains * x x Monsanto MON 88913 the cp4epsps 11/26/201 coding 0 sequence from Agrobacterium sp. Strain, CP4 which confers tolerance to the Roundup family of herbicides 29. Corn MON 88017 Contains * x x Monsanto cry3Bb1 gene 3/21/2011 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. Kumamotoensis , which confers resistance to the corn rootworm, Diabrotica spp and cp4epsps gene from Agrobacterium sp., which encodes tolerance to glyphosate resistance 30. Soybean A5547-127 Contains a * x x Bayer synthetic 6/23/2011 Crop phosphinothrici Science n acetyltransferas e (pat gene) from Streptomyces viridochromoge nes expressing tolerance to glufosinate ammonium herbicide 31. Alfalfa J101 and J163 Contains * x x Monsanto cp4epsps 8/9/2011 coding sequence from Agrobacterium sp. Strain, CP4 which confers tolerance to the Roundup family of agricultural herbicides 32. Corn 59122 Contains * x x Pioneer cry34Ab1 and 8/9/2011 Hi-Bred cry35Ab1 from and Dow Bacillus Agro thuringiensis Sciences which confers resistance to certain coleopteran pests such as corn rootworm, Diabrotica sp. And the pat gene from Streptomyces viridochromoge nes which provides tolerance to glufosinate- ammonium herbicides *Renewal Source: Bureau of Plant Industry ANNEX II - APPROVAL REGISTRY FOR THE REGISTRATIONM OF COMBINED TRAIT PRODUCTS FOR DIRECT USE AS FOOD, FEED & FOR PROPAGATION As of June 7, 2012 As of June 7, 2012 Safety Assessment Combined Trait Product Technology Developer Date Approved Food Feed Propagation 1. Corn Bt11 x Corn MIR 604 Syngenta 12/13/07 x x 2. Corn MIR 604 x Corn GA21 Syngenta 12/13/07 x x 3. Corn Bt11 x Corn MIR 604 x GA21 Syngenta 03/03/08 x x 4. Corn MON89034 x Corn NK603 Monsanto 07/22/09 x x x * 03/04/11 5. Corn MON89034 x Corn MON88017 Monsanto 10/19/09 x x 6. Corn MON810 x Corn NK603 Monsanto * 01/8/10 x x x * 07/16/10 7. Corn MON810 x Corn MON863 Monsanto * 01/8/10 x x 8. Corn NK603 x Corn MON863 Monsanto * 01/8/10 x x 9. Cotton 531 x Cotton 1445 Monsanto * 01/8/10 x x 10. Cotton 15985 x Cotton 1445 Monsanto * 01/8/10 x x 12. Corn MON810 x GA21 Monsanto * 02/8/10 x x 13. Corn MON89034 x Corn 1507 x Monsanto 02/09/10 x x Corn 88017 x Corn 59122 14. Corn NK603 x Corn T25 Monsanto 04/22/10 x x 15. Corn Bt11 x Corn MIR 162 x GA21 Syngenta 07/28/10 x x 16. Corn 3272 x Corn Bt11 x Syngenta 07/28/10 x x Corn MIR604 x Corn GA21 17. Corn Bt11 x Corn MIR612 x Syngenta 12/10/10 x x Corn MIR604 x Corn GA21 18. Corn MON89034 x Corn TC1507 x Dow Agro Sciences & 12/10/10 x x Corn NK603 M onsanto 19. Corn Bt11 x Corn MIR612 x Syngenta 12/22/10 x x Corn TC1507 x Corn GA21 20. Corn TC1507 x Corn NK603 Pioneer Hi-Bred & Dow * 02/17/11 x x Agro Sciences 21. Cotton 15985 x RR Flex Cotton x x (MON 88913) Monsanto * 04/20/11 22. Corn MON88017 x Corn MON810 Monsanto * 07/01/11 x x 23. Corn BT11 x Corn DAS59122 x Corn Syngenta 09/03/11 x x M IR604 x Corn TC1507 x Corn GA21 24. Corn Bt 11 x Corn GA21 Syngenta * 01/23/12 x x x * 09/06/10 25. Corn 59122 x Corn NK603 Pioneer Hi-Bred & * 02/07/12 x x Dow Agro Sciences P 12 ioneer Hi-Bred & * 02/07/ 26. Corn TC1507 x Corn 5912 Dow Agro Sciences x x 27. Corn 59122 X Corn TC1507 x Pioneer Hi-Bred & Dow Corn NK603 Agro Sciences * 02/07/12 x x Pioneer Hi-Bred 03/16/12 x x 28. Corn TC1507 x Corn MON810 x Corn NK603 *Renewal Source: Bureau of Plant Industry
Posted: 30 September 2012

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