Food Processing Sector Report

An Expert's View about Food , Beverages and Tobacco in Portugal

Last updated: 12 May 2011

The macroeconomic conditions in Portugal are leading to a decline in the consumption of higher value added products and in the number of meals taken outside the household.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 5/6/2011 GAIN Report Number: PT1102 Portugal FOOD PROCESSING SECTOR Food Processing Ingredients Post: Madrid Approved By: Robert Hanson, Agricultural Attaché Prepared By: Diogo Machado Mendes, Agricultural Specialist Report Highlights: Portugal is in the midst of a political and economic crisis ? the recent collapse of the center-left government coincides with the country?s need for financial assistance from the European Commission to help restore growth and financial stability. High unemployment, widespread austerity measures and economic uncertainty are having a significant impact on consumption patterns. The macroeconomic conditions in Portugal are leading to a decline in the consumption of higher value added products and in the number of meals taken outside the household. A gradual process of adjustment is already causing a contraction in imports. At the same time Portuguese exports of consumer-ready food products are holding and are expected to expand, increasing its market share mostly in third countries. This presents an opportunity for U.S. exports of food ingredients. 1 SECTION I. MARKET SUMMARY On April 6th 2011, Portugal requested financial assistance from the European Commission to help restore growth and financial stability. The bail-out, worth 78bn Euros ($115bn), will be in the form of loans from other European countries and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). This follows a gradual process of loss of competitiveness as wages have risen and tariffs on Asian exports into Europe have been reduced. Low growth and high government spending have caused a problem of excessive debt in the country. A gradual process of adjustment has already started with a contraction in imports and also an increase in exports from 2010. A number of policies on the demand and supply sides of the economy are expected to contribute to the remaining adjustment required. Among these are labor cost adjustments, reforms to increase productivity, and fiscal consolidation measures (in the short term, raising taxes and cutting government spending to improve the current account balance by curbing domestic demand). Table 1 summarizes the main macroeconomic variables as projected by the IMF in its World Economic Outlook. These only account for the approved fiscal measures, thus excluding the measures proposed in March 2011, which were rejected by Parliament. Table 1. Portugal: Real GDP, Consumer Prices, Current Account Balance, and Unemployment Projections 2010 2011 2012 Real GDP growth (%) 1.4 -1.5 -0.5 Consumer Pri 1 ces (%) 1.4 2.4 1.4 Current Account Balanc 2e (%) -9.9 -8.7 -8.5 Unemployment (%) 11.0 11.9 12.4 1Movements in consumer prices are shown as annual averages 2Percent of GDP Source: IMF World Economic Outlook (WEO) http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2011/01/index.htm Production and Sales According to the National Institute of Statistics (INE) Portugal had 10,461 food and drink companies in 2009 generating a total sales value of over ? 10.6 billion and total services value of ? 150 Million, corresponding to 7.2 percent of the national GDP in that year. While the number of companies in the drinks industry has been continuously rising since 2004 the same has not happened to the food sector where a concentration of supply in fewer companies has been occurring (Diagram 1). Diagram 1. Number of Food and Drink companies in Portugal 2 Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) The sector is characterized by the small size of its companies with more than 80 percent and 74 percent of the food and drink companies, respectively, employing less than 10 people (Table 2). Table 2. Structure of the sector in 2008 Companies Employees Turnover Gross Value Added 2008 Number % Number % Million ? % Million ? % Food Industry 9,886 100.0% 97,329 100.0% 12,188 100.0% 2,157 100.0% less than 10 people 7,917 80.1% 22,307 22.9% 1,002 8.2% 233 10.8% 10 - 49 people 1,646 16.6% 31,582 32.4% 2,750 22.6% 550 25.5% 50 - 249 people 293 3.0% 29,215 30.0% 5,103 41.9% 803 37.2% 250 or more people 30 0.3% 14,225 14.6% 3,334 27.4% 571 26.5% Drinks Industry 949 100.0% 14,079 100.0% 2,993 100.0% 665 100.0% less than 10 people 709 74.7% 1,499 10.6% 284 9.5% 44 6.6% 10 - 49 people 191 20.1% 3,988 28.3% 504 16.8% 138 20.7% 50 - 249 people 42 4.4% 4,124 29.3% 642 21.4% 179 26.9% 250 or more people 7 0.7% 4,468 31.7% 1,563 52.2% 304 45.8% Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) Like in previous years, the food industries represented the main activity of the processing industry, (about 14.7 per cent of the processing industry total) despite a 7.8 per cent decrease from 2008. This was a lower decrease than the felt on the total processing industry in 2009 (-15.6 per cent). Diagram 2. Share of Sales of the Food and Drink Industries, 2009 (Million Euros) 3 Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) While the total volume of sales has decreased abruptly following the end of the 2007/08 price spike of food, the interesting thing to note on Table 3 is the dynamics of each of the food industries. The meat, dairy, and fruit and vegetable processing sectors have increased their share in the national total and the latter was the only sub-sector to have increased its sales in absolute value. Table 3. Value and Share of Sales of each sector of food and drink companies T 2008 2009 urnover Million ? % Million ? % Food and Drinks Industries Total 15,048 100% 10,641 100% Food industry* 12,055 80% 8,172 77% Animal slaughtering, preparation, and conservation of meat and meat products 2,199 15% 1,738 16% Preparation and conservation of fish, crustaceans, and other mollusks 1,093 7% 634 6% Preparation and conservation of fruits and horticulture products 455 3% 530 5% Production of animal and vegetable oils and greases 1,101 7% 714 7% Dairy industry 1,703 11% 1,224 12% Processing of cereals and legume crops; Production of starch paste and flour and like products 764 5% 429 4% Manufacture of bakery products and other flour based products 1,773 12% 890 8% Manufacture of other food products 1,452 10% 1,052 10% Manufacture of food for animals 1,515 10% 961 9% Drinks Industry 2,993 20% 2,469 23% Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) * the reported total volume of sales of the food industry in 2008 is 12,188 Million Euros but this does not correspond to the sum of the parts. For the effect of comparison of share of sales we preferred to include the sum of the parts. Table 4 shows that household expenditure on food and beverage is estimated to have increased in 2010, following higher prices of food items. 4 Table 4. Household expenditure on food and beverage products 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009e 2010e Million Euros 17,762 18,590 19,417 20,530 20,104 20,423 year-on-year growth(%) 4.7% 4.5% 5.7% -2.1% 1.6% Source: National Institute of Statisti cs (INE) Trade Portugal?s food and the drinks industries target mostly the internal market. The country still has a big deficit in terms of food production with 44 per cent of total food consumption in 2009 being imported. Diagram 3. Portuguese food industry sales by market, 2009 Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) Diagram 4. Portuguese drinks industry sales by market, 2009 Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) Both imports and exports of food ingredients have been increasing as the country progresses in its integration on the world markets. The value of imports from the U.S. occupies a low share of the total as Portugal has been turning to imports from other EU countries. 5 Diagram 5. Portuguese Imports of Agricultural Products (? Million) Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) Portugal?s competitive food processing sector should be an important target for U.S. food-ingredient exporters. The sector is modern and innovative paying special attention to the quality, safety, and traceability of the food products it produces. Some of the main advantages and challenges faced by U.S. exporters of food ingredients and products are shown in Table 5. Table 5. Advantages and Challenges facing U.S. products in Portugal Advantages Challenges Portugal is a net importer of food and agricultural U.S. exports face higher transportation costs and products. U.S. food and agricultural products have difficulties in shipping mixed or smaller container loads. a good reputation for quality. Good network of agents and importers to help get Importers prefer to take delivery on short notice to avoid product into the market. Portugal is also a good storage charges. High marketing costs with advertising, gateway to export to Portuguese speaking countries discounts, etc. U.S. suppliers may need to conduct in Africa. promotion activities. Portuguese exports of consumer-ready food Household disposable income is getting lower as the products are holding and are expected to expand. economic crisis unfolds in the country. This is an opportunity for U.S. exports of food ingredients. Consumers are more health conscious and demand EU labeling, traceability, and packaging laws and a has been growing for value-added products, reluctance to purchase products containing genetically convenience foods and functional foods. modified ingredients can be a challenge. Favorable dollar exchange rate. Competition from neighboring EU countries is fierce. SECTION II. ROAD MAP FOR MARKET ENTRY A. Entry Strategy 6 Success in introducing your product in the Portuguese market depends on acquiring local representation and making personal contact. The advantages of local representation include market knowledge, up-to- date information and guidance on business practices and trade laws, sales contacts, and market development expertise. Good contacts are important for the exporter to be aware of future contracts and participate in tenders. Having a distributor that is appointed on an exclusive basis is ideal. While modern sales techniques are becoming more prevalent, many business people still prefer personal contact as a way of doing business rather than just via email, fax or phone. English is a widely spoken second language in Portugal, and U.S. exporters can expect to conduct their meetings with contacts in English. Large importers and wholesalers have branch sales offices and/or sub-agents or dealers in the principal cities and towns, with main offices concentrated in Porto and Lisbon. Typically, food products are imported by an importer, broker and/or a distributor. Food Standards and Regulations U.S. processed food exporters face additional challenges in the Portuguese market because of the EU labeling and traceability regulations. Any product that contains genetically modified ingredients must be labeled so that the consumer can distinguish the product. Since Portuguese consumers are not familiar with genetically modified ingredients, food processors, retailers and the HRI sector may be reluctant to purchase these products. For more information on food standards and regulations, please consult the Food and Agricultural Import Regulations and Standards Report (FAIRS) and the FAIRS Export Certificate Report for the EU at: http://www.fas.usda.gov/scriptsw/AttacheRep/default.asp. Also, please check the U.S. Mission to the European Union web page at http://www.useu.be/agri/expguide.html for helpful information on exporting U.S. food and agricultural products into the EU. Import and Inspection Procedures Portugal uses the Harmonized Nomenclature and Classification System (HS) and applies import duties according to a maximum and minimum rate schedule. The minimum tariff rate is applied to goods originating in countries entitled to the benefits of most-favored nation treatment (that is, members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and countries with which the EU has signed trade agreements) including the United States. However, the EU has negotiated free-trade agreements, providing in many cases tariff-free access to the European market, which can leave the U.S. exporter at a disadvantage. The local importer is responsible to the Portuguese Government of imported food products when they enter Portuguese territory. Therefore, the Portuguese agent/importer should guide you through the whole process to market your product in Portugal. The following documents are required for ocean or air cargo shipments of food products to Portugal: 7 Bill of Lading and/or Airway Bill Commercial Invoice Phytosanitary Certificate and/or Health Certificate when applicable Import Certificate Most food products require an Import Certificate issued by the competent Portuguese authority. However, the Import Certificate is obtained by the Portuguese importer and/or the agent involved in the business and is intended for tariff classification purposes. Please keep in mind that if the product you are exporting into Portugal does not comply with EU harmonized regulations, Portuguese customs or health authorities may not allow entry of the product. B. Market Structure Diagram 6 ? Market Structure U.S. Exporter Importer, Agent, Wholesa Rep for Europe ler U.S. Food Processor Wholesa Retail & HRI ler, Distributor Sector 8 C. Company Profiles Portugal has a wide range of food-processing sectors, many of them importing food ingredients. Table 6. Some of the Highest Turnover Food Industry Companies in Portugal Turnover # NAME Sub-sector Region (Euros) Employees LACTOGAL - PRODUTOS ALIMENTARES, S.A. Dairy Porto 686,574,204 1775 SOVENA PORTUGAL - CONSUMER GOODS, S.A. Edible Oils Oeiras 565,792,249 260 UNICER - BEBIDAS, S.A. Drinks Matosinhos 451,092,422 1090 SCC - SOCIEDADE CENTRAL DE CERVEJAS E Drinks Vila Franca de 389,924,578 823 BEBIDAS, S.A Xira SUMOL + COMPAL, MARCAS, S.A. Drinks Oeiras 231,952,792 1300 SOVENA OILSEEDS PORTUGAL, S.A Edible Oils Oeiras 225,061,419 124 REFRIGE - SOCIEDADE INDUSTRIAL DE Drinks Palmela 188,546,690 426 REFRIGERANTES, S.A. DANONE PORTUGAL, S.A. Dairy Lisboa 171,882,293 283 SIDUL AÇUCARES, UNIPESSOAL LDA Sugar Loures 147,738,053 209 CARNES DO CONTINENTE - INDÚSTRIA E Meat Products Matosinhos 133,588,595 536 DISTRIBUIÇÃO DE CARNES S.A SOGRAPE VINHOS, S.A. Drinks Vila Nova de 127,679,464 560 Gaia RAÇÕES VALOURO, S.A. Animal Feed Lourinhã 117,138,153 135 LUSIAVES - INDÚSTRIA E COMÉRCIO AGRO- Poultry Figueira da Foz 109,404,851 509 ALIMENTAR, S.A. FROMAGERIES - BEL PORTUGAL, S.A. Dairy Lisboa 107,851,382 615 NOVADELTA - COMÉRCIO E INDÚSTRIA DE CAFÉS, Coffee Campo Maior 106,610,397 398 S.A RIBERALVES - COMERCIO E INDUSTRIA DE Fish Products Torres Vedras 103,592,991 110 PRODUTOS ALIMENTARES, S.A. KRAFT FOODS PORTUGAL - PRODUTOS Consumer Amadora 102,617,979 34 ALIMENTARES, UNIPESSOAL, LDA. Ready CEREALIS - PRODUTOS ALIMENTARES, S.A. Baking Maia 95,580,143 328 Industry RAR - REFINARIAS DE AÇÚCAR REUNIDAS, S.A. Sugar Porto 95,158,770 237 SICASAL - INDÚSTRIA E COMÉRCIO DE CARNES, S.A. Meat Products Mafra 94,441,662 648 CEREALIS - MOAGENS, S.A. Milling Maia 92,240,807 193 Industry SUGALIDAL - INDUSTRIAS DE ALIMENTAÇÃO, S.A Tomato Benavente 91,495,247 400 Processing NOBRE ALIMENTAÇÃO, S.A. Meat Products Rio Maior 88,782,413 770 Source: Portuguese Entrepreneurial Association (AEP) 9 D. Sector Trends The Portuguese food industry has been adapting to an open market, while at the same time changing its production structures to face increasingly demanding environment legislation. A growing number of companies adopt hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) systems and choose to be certified according to internationally recognized quality and safety standards. Communication with consumers has been perfected and the information included on labels is in many cases more detailed than what is legally demanded. Some of the current most important market drivers are: The macroeconomic conditions that the country is living in are leading to a fall in the consumption of higher value added products and in the number of meals taken outside the household. Imports of consumer oriented agricultural products have decreased for the second consecutive year in 2010 (Diagram 7). At the same time Portuguese exports of consumer-ready food products are holding and are expected to expand, increasing its market share mostly in third countries (Diagram 8). This is an opportunity for U.S. exports of food ingredients. Demanding labeling and traceability requirements are forcing consolidation of all levels of the food chain. Consumers have become more health conscious: problems concerning food safety are widely publicized and usually receive immediate attention from government agencies. Diagram 7. Portuguese Imports of Consumer Oriented Agric. Total, Group 32 (US$ Million) Source: Global Trade Atlas (GTA) Diagram 8. Portuguese Exports of Consumer Oriented Agric. Total, Group 32 (US$ Million) 10 Source: Global Trade Atlas (GTA) SECTION III. COMPETITION U.S. exporters face competition from EU countries that benefit from the Common Market, and face lower transportation costs and difficulties in shipping mixed or smaller container loads. This is true for agricultural products (Diagram 9) and for food products (Diagram 10). Diagram 9. Main Import Origins of Agricultural Products (? Million) Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) EU countries also use the same labeling, traceability, and packaging laws. Its products are in most cases free of genetically modified ingredients. 11 Diagram 10. Main Import Origins of Food Products (? Million) Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) SECTION IV. BEST PRODUCT PROSPECTS Following rebounding world commodity prices U.S. exports of agricultural and food products to Portugal have recovered in 2010 (Diagram 11). Diagram 11. U.S. Agricultural and Fishery Exports to Portugal Source: FAS ? BICO 12 Bulk products continue to be the most important in value as Portugal has a chronic deficit of cereals and protein crop products. This means wheat, coarse grains, and products of the soybean complex will always be among the most important U.S. exports to Portugal (Table 7 and 8). Table 7. U.S. Exports of Bulk Products to Portugal January - December Values in Thousands of dollars 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Product Value Value Value Value Value Bulk Total 64,067 227,356 221,004 62,893 68,007 Tobacco 11,880 45,719 34,827 42,569 27,502 Wheat 1,630 38,937 34,234 8,435 18,920 Soybeans 46,590 117,461 117,595 8,864 13,639 Coarse Grains 13 15,833 23,481 37 3,741 Peanuts 249 813 1,312 721 1,616 Pulses 1,904 794 1,853 1,426 1,394 Cotton 1,580 7,273 6,831 421 713 Other Bulk Commodities 221 526 834 420 482 Rice 0 0 37 0 0 Source: FAS ? BICO Table 8. U.S. Exports of Intermediate Products to Portugal January - December Values in Thousands of dollars 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Product Value Value Value Value Value Intermediate Total 41,784 17,580 19,832 10,583 26,477 Soybean Meal 0 3 7 0 11,372 Planting Seeds 5,310 3,184 5,789 4,921 6,619 Other Intermediate Products 1,102 2,220 3,877 5,115 5,355 Feeds & Fodders 30,318 9,021 9,743 0 2,886 Hides & Skins 423 383 219 297 171 Sugar, Sweeteners, Bev Bases 292 299 178 53 31 Live Animals 195 146 0 66 21 Vegetable Oils (Ex Soybean) 4,145 2,324 17 132 21 Soybean Oil 0 0 3 0 0 Source: FAS ? BICO Tree nuts, and in particular almonds and walnuts, are some of the most valuable U.S. exports to Portugal. Its share is higher than 50% of all consumer oriented products exported by the U.S. and it is rising (Table 9). 13 Table 9. U.S. Exports of Consumer Oriented Products to Portugal January - December Values in Thousands of dollars 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Product Value Value Value Value Value Consumer Oriented Total 11,327 10,718 12,420 10,858 11,444 Tree Nuts 5,609 4,673 5,841 5,619 6,496 Other Consumer Oriented 2,284 2,726 1,531 2,282 2,298 Snack Foods 460 679 723 717 880 Processed Fruit & Vegetables 903 323 1,743 648 744 Pet Foods 1,117 1,134 1,061 448 416 Breakfast Cereals 96 223 194 242 240 Fruit & Vegetable Juices 98 191 95 483 149 Dairy Products 193 293 105 233 123 Red Meats, FR/CH/FR 235 311 989 54 38 Wine and Beer 139 140 19 15 35 Poultry Meat 32 16 42 4 12 Fresh Vegetables 0 0 18 0 12 Red Meats, Prep/Pres 0 4 0 0 0 Eggs & Products 70 0 0 0 0 Nursery Products 91 4 58 111 0 Source: FAS ? BICO Fish products are very promising products to export to Portugal. The country has one of the highest per capita consumption levels of fish in the world and its relationship with cod is inextricable from national history and local culture. Moreover, Portuguese companies have successfully been processing Pacific cod for internal consumption and re-export into Latin America in recent years (Table 10). Table 10. U.S. Exports of Fish Products to Portugal January - December Values in Thousands of dollars 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Product Value Value Value Value Value Fish Products 58,047 63,434 67,416 23,731 38,489 Other Edible Fish & Seafood 55,628 58,592 61,319 21,630 36,831 Salmon Whole or Eviscerated 1,065 4,488 5,757 1,347 1,543 Roe & Urchin (Fish Eggs) 790 286 328 357 115 Salmon Canned 0 57 0 0 0 Crab & Meat 85 11 12 42 0 Surimi (Fish Paste) 478 0 0 356 0 Source: FAS ? BICO 14 Table 11. Products present in the market that have good sales potential 2010 2010 5 Year H Market Portuguese Average Import S Product Attraction for U.S. Co e Imports Import Tariff Key Constraints de Ca Siztegory Exporters (US$ (US$ Growth Rate Million) Million) (%) Portugal is a net importer of 1001 Wheat 352 338 -7% * Price sensitivity. grains. Portugal is a net importer of 1005 Corn 486 339 6% * GM legislation grains and oilseeds for feed consumption. Price sensitivity and volatility. Portugal is a net importer of 120100 Soybeans 364 375 -17% * Competition from grains and oilseeds for feed Brazil. GM consumption. legislation. Price sensitivity and volatility. Soybean Portugal is a net importer of 120810 M 1 5 40% * Competition from eal Bra feed raw materials. zil and Argentina. Price sensitivity and volatility. Soybean 1507 Oil 56 116 656% * Competition from Food and Biodiesel Market. Brazil and Argentina. Competition from Good reputation of U.S. Sunflower 120600 151 67 131% * Israel, Argentina produced confectionary Seeds and China. sunflower seeds. Domestic consumption of pulses is high in Portugal, Strong particularly for dry edible beans, an important 713 Pulses 42 59 -6% competition from * Canada and component of the Portuguese Argentina. diet. Portuguese companies also process and re-export dry edible beans. Domestic consumption of tree Aflatoxin nuts is increasing due to their 802 Nuts 236 42 -6% * controls. utilization in the confection industry. Heavy Good reputation and competition reliability of U.S. producers. Frozen from other EU 303 526 413 -25% * ning up for Fish M New market opeember States re-exports to Brazil after and domestic processing in Portugal. suppliers. * Please see 2011 EU Common Customs Tariff for the conventional rate of duties (%) and the WTO tariff quotas to be opened by the competent Community authorities (Annex 7). 15 SECTION V. POST CONTACT AND FURTHER INFORMATION If you have any questions or comments regarding this report or need assistance exporting to Portugal, please contact the Office of Agricultural Affairs in Madrid at the following address: Foreign Agricultural Service American Embassy, Madrid American Embassy, Madrid PSC 61, Box 20 C/ Serrano, 75 APO AE 09642 28006 Madrid Tel. +34-91 587 2555 Spain Fax: +34-91 587 2556 Email: AgMadrid@usda.gov http://spanish.madrid.usembassy.gov/ Please consult our home page for more information on exporting U.S. food products to Portugal. Importer lists are also available from our office to exporters of U.S. food products. A list of trade associations and useful government agencies is provided below: Trade Associations APED-Associação Portuguesa de Empresas de Distribuição (Portuguese Association of Distribution Companies) Campo Grande, 285-5º 1700-096 Lisboa Tel: +351-21-751-0920 Fax: +351-21-757-1952 www.aped.pt ARESP-Associação da Restauração e Similares de Portugal (Portuguese Associations for HRIs Sector) Av. Duque d?Avila, 75 1000 Lisboa Tel. +351-21-352-7060 Fax: +351-21-354-9428 Email: aresp@aresp.pt www.aresp.pt FIPA-Federação das Indústrias Portuguesas Agro-Alimentares (Federation of the Agro-Food Portuguese Industries) Av. António José de Almeida, 7-2º 16 1000-042 Lisboa Tel: +351-21-793-8679 Fax: +351-21-793-8537 Email: info@fipa.pt www.fipa.pt Government Agencies ASAE - Autoridade da Segurança Alimentar e Económica (Food Safety and Economic Authority) Av. Conde de Valbom, 98 1069-185 Lisboa Tel. +351-217 983 600 Fax: +351-217 983 654 Email: correio.asae@asae.pt www.asae.pt Direcção Geral da Alfandega e Dos Impostos Especiais sobre o Consumo (General Directorate for Customs and Special Taxation on Consumption) Rua da Alfandega, No. 5 r/c 1149-006 Lisboa Tel. +351-218813700 Fax: +351-218813990 Email: dgaiec@dgaiec.min-financas.pt www.dgaiec.min-financas.pt Direcção Geral da Alfandega e Dos Impostos Especiais sobre o Consumo (General Directorate for Customs and Special Taxation on Consumption) Direcção de Serviços do Licenciamentos (Import Certificates) R. Terreiro do Trigo Edif. Alfândega 1149-060 Lisboa Tel. +351-218814262 Fax +351-218814261 Email: dsl@dgaiec.min-financas.pt www.dgaiec.min-financas.pt For more information on exporting U.S. agricultural products to other countries, please visit the Foreign Agricultural Service home page at www.fas.usda.gov Other Related Reports: Report number Title Date released LINK Exporter Guide Annual 2011 - Portugal 03/23/2011 LINK EU-27 Food and Agriculture Import Regulations 17 These reports can be accessed through the FAS website http://gain.fas.usda.gov/Pages/Default.aspx. 18 Annex I. Statistics Table A1. Total number and value of sales of food industry companies by business type Economic Value of Sales CAE Activity National European Third Services R Designation ev.3 Un Total its (UAE) Market Union Countries # Euros 10 Food Industry Total 1,981 8,171,584,448 6,956,533,670 942,342,753 272,708,025 95,657,733 10110 Livestock slaughter 101 734,677,095 689,341,258 35,140,619 10,195,218 31,014,903 (meat production) 10120 Poultry slaughter (meat 33 473,630,126 467,401,932 5,668,114 560,080 2,562,086 production) 10130 Production of meat 141 529,505,624 449,761,072 18,518,077 61,226,475 8,572,940 products 10200 Preparation and 93 634,114,722 448,789,081 129,163,426 56,162,215 14,040,054 conservation of fish, crustaceans, and mollusks 10310 Preparation and 9 81,761,318 77,244,818 4,516,500 0 0 conservation of potatoes 10320 Production of juices 10 104,569,179 98,607,729 ? ? ? from fruit and vegetable products 10391 Freezing of fruit and 8 57,728,595 13,277,010 43,981,017 470,568 29,538 vegetable products 10392 Drying and dehydration 3 12,564,858 ? 11,111,278 ? 0 of fruit and vegetable products 10393 Production of sweets, 20 8,842,388 8,572,597 218,338 51,453 ? jams, jellies, and marmalade 10394 23 39,265,806 19,039,705 19,219,662 1,006,439 ? Shelling and processing of edible nuts 10395 Preparation and 25 225,276,646 75,036,426 119,422,055 30,818,165 ? conservation of fruit and vegetables for other processes 10411 Production of raw 5 11,766,236 2,913,763 7,115,441 1,737,032 ? animal oils and fats 10412 Production of olive oil 98 57,762,592 47,722,732 9,436,636 603,224 1,726,646 10413 Production of raw 10 392,841,980 357,917,756 34,924,224 0 ? vegetable oils (except olive oil) 10414 Refining of olive oil, 6 216,844,139 174,753,925 9,598,412 32,491,802 ? oils and fats 10420 Production of 2 34,418,062 31,000,758 3,417,304 0 0 margarines and similar edible fats 10510 Dairy industry 76 1,223,752,689 1,108,533,515 99,960,364 15,258,810 306,430 10520 Production of ice- 16 37,294,260 18,626,286 ? ? ? creams and sorbets 19 Economic Value of Sales CAE Activity National European Third Services R Designation Total ev.3 Units (UAE) Market Union Countries # Euros 10611 Milling of cereals 51 274,018,041 269,462,674 3,627,704 927,663 ? 10612 Husking, whitening and 7 105,611,465 96,937,094 ? ? 21,250 other treatments of rice 10613 Processing of cereals 8 49,267,065 46,570,961 ? ? 0 and legume crops, n.e. 10620 Production of starch 1 ? ? ? ? 0 paste and flour and similar products 10710 Bread and pastry 975 617,395,521 595,388,377 21,933,079 74,065 31,256,856 baking 10720 Production of cookies, 52 203,365,088 141,748,362 52,400,598 9,216,128 572,277 biscuits, toasts, and conservation pastry 10730 Production of dough, 4 69,120,219 64,241,154 ? ? 0 cuscus and similar products 10810 Sugar industry 7 312,637,320 164,929,602 ? ? 2,187,617 10821 Production of cocoa 9 22,040,829 18,306,954 1,766,761 1,967,114 0 and chocolate 10822 Production of 25 33,651,465 27,684,236 287,227 5,680,002 ? confectionary products 10830 Coffee and tea industry 28 325,986,666 288,074,110 32,395,176 5,517,380 163,028 10840 Production of 18 54,234,088 31,309,169 20,066,318 2,858,601 30,463 condiments and seasonings 10850 Production of pre- 14 17,878,588 16,782,664 947,130 148,794 0 cooked meals 10860 Production of 4 64,480,611 37,174,067 ? ? 0 homogenized and dietary food products 10891 Production of ferment, 7 21,232,487 7,206,512 11,073,099 2,952,876 0 yeasts, and adjuvants for the bread and pastry baking 10892 Production of gruels, 7 32,996,204 19,328,823 ? ? 0 soups and deserts 10893 Production of other 14 96,587,913 60,338,256 32,504,201 3,745,456 ? sundry food products, n.e. 10910 Production of food for 67 961,380,959 952,295,934 8,577,536 507,489 558,545 breeding stock 10920 Production of food for 4 ? 6,003,982 1,403,713 ? 0 pets Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) 20 Table A2. Production and sales of the main Food Industry products Quantity Pr Value of Sales oduced Products Unit Produced Sold (Euros) 2008 (Rv) 2009 Main P roducts: Milk Pasteurized and Ultra pasteurized, not kg 767,199,164 721,130,605 729,770,225 384, 603,517 concentrated, without added sugar or other sweeteners, whole and semi-skimmed (6% ?fat content >1%), in ready packages with liquid content ? 2 L Food kg 1,459,917,060 1,363,467,155 1,329,491,737 379,727,226 for breeding stock (except pre-mixes): barn animals Bread without added honey, eggs, cheese or fruit k g 263,114,561 260,787,333 257,339,853 375,039,960 W 461,627,537 515,026,557 486,313,113 300,026,568 hite cane or beet sugar, in solid state k g Roasted, non decaffeinated coffee k g 34,952,869 37,014,601 36,558,695 279,920,767 Broilers, roosters and whole chickens, fresh or 142,182,817 172,380,802 167,215,247 278,929,810 kg refrigerated G 53,662,675 56,100,753 56,576,549 277,014,345 rated or powdered cheeses, blue paste cheeses, and kg other cheeses 1,144,503,221 979,625,150 971,386,438 257,514,822 Food for breeding stock (except pre-mixes): swine k g P 58,747,431 58,972,520 58,040,822 238,082,677 astry k g 1,057,867,085 951,425,305 949,580,128 229,889,859 Food for breeding stock (except pre-mixes): cattle k g Sw kg 96,616,106 101,046,092 98,821,205 207,982,707 ine meats, fresh or refrigerated, except loins, legs, shoulders and cuts thereof, carcasses and half carcasses kg 98,563,258 102,788,302 98,779,131 206,530,105 Curd, cream, yogurts and other fermented products, with aromas or added of fruit, including shell fruits, or cocoa, includes kefir (except powdered, granulated or other solid form) Dry or salted fish k g 47,808,669 51,260,937 37,143,951 204,160,569 W 659,969,541 675,720,166 655,823,730 203,796,862 heat or wheat and rye mix flours k g kg 67,643,719 69,381,723 68,427,268 203,492,926 Sausages and similar products, of meat, offal or blood, includes food preparations made from such products (except liver and prepared meals) kg 606,053,480 622,432,400 654,090,059 200,446,519 Bagasse and other solid residues, even grinded or in pellets, from the extraction of soybean oil Swine loins, legs, shoulders and cuts thereof, not kg 74,848,528 67,461,015 65,581,173 148,405,057 deboned, fresh or refrigerated Salt water fish, frozen k g 5 0 , 7 1 6 , 5 3 6 6 0,423,062 48,083,528 146,339,787 Swine carcasses and half-carcasses (includes 148,842,679 142,422,189 65,125,858 130,939,472 kg suckling pigs and wild boars), fresh or refrigerated Tomato concentrate k g 2 0 6 , 4 0 4 , 6 0 8 1 8 4 , 4 1 9 ,422 133,802,335 118,163,399 Other food produc x 3,400,577,494 ts x x x Total Produced Products x x x x 8,171,584,448 Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) 21 Table A3. Total number and value of sales of Beverage Industry companies by business type Economic Value of Sales CAE Activity Units R Designation T National European Third Services otal ev.3 (UAE) Market Union Countries # Euros Total Beverage 11 Industry 279 2,469,069,706 1,845,410,232 403,084,676 220,574,798 59,213,919 11010 Production of distilled 58 56,283,896 51,548,985 2,198,365 2,536,546 224,690 alcoholic drinks 11020 Wine industry 171 932,837,966 490,705,810 319,500,869 122,631,287 39,892,666 11030 Production of cider 1 ? ? ? ? 0 and other fermented fruit drinks 11040 Production of 0 0 0 0 0 0 vermouths and other fermented non- distilled drinks 11050 Production of beer 5 632,995,753 509,281,537 38,601,540 85,112,676 24,871 11060 Production of malt 2 ? ? ? ? 0 11071 Bottling of natural and 22 251,064,751 245,145,619 1,559,017 4,360,115 79,886 spring mineral waters 11072 Production of soft 20 579,787,541 548,209,754 26,004,929 5,572,858 18,991,806 drinks and other non- alcoholic drinks n.e. Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) Table A4. Production and sales of the main Food Industry products Quantities Pr Value of Sales oduced Products Unit Produced Sold (Euros) 2008 (Rv) 2009 Main P roducts: Malt beer l 8 1 4 , 8 0 0 , 6 2 0 742,079,530 739,571,064 629, 345,840 Soft drinks l 6 3 0 , 3 9 1 , 0 1 9 678,125,795 667,964,076 578,633,737 Liqueur wines (Port, Madeira, Moscatel de l 169,766,589 168,962,307 134,885,255 448,114,324 Setúbal) with alcohol content higher than 15% vol Mineral and gasified waters, without added l 1,097,673,064 1,107,822,559 1,093,664,261 249,631,153 sweeteners Other red and rose wines l 1 3 8 , 3 9 3 , 4 2 5 1 3 5 , 2 2 4,194 148,243,808 193,940,677 V.Q.P.R.D. red and rose wines l 63,334,217 65,458,937 45,185,410 111,117,123 V.Q.P.R.D. white wines (?verde? and others) l 49,834,115 48,750,326 41,010,954 94,388,423 Other white wines l 6 7 , 0 6 3 , 0 5 1 5 5 , 0 92,298 54,827,787 50,861,744 W l alc 14,493,362 13,153,714 9,911,012 26,639,260 ine and grappa brandies 100% Liqueurs and other spirits (includes mixed liqueur, l alc 2,052,698 2,189,039 2,104,423 26,590,835 cherry liqueur, bitter almond liqueur, anisette, and 100% others) Quality sparkling wines with alcohol content equal l 6,356,483 4,907,923 5,035,374 21,367,277 or higher than 8,5% vol Unroasted malt k g ? ? ? ? Grape must (except rectified) l 4 , 9 5 2 , 9 2 0 1 5 , 4 8 2 ,879 15,244,541 7,257,655 Other wines and grape musts (includes l 2,698,475 5,059,945 5,136,164 2,452,745 concentrated, rectified, fresh and other musts) Wine making wastes (includes grape bagasse); lees kg 56,326,403 53,988,679 52,619,600 2,296,191 and gross wine scale Other waters without added aromas or sweeteners l 23,659,485 22,842,448 22,953,260 1,407,059 Rum and other spirit drinks distilled from l alc 99,160 139,686 158,467 1,344,086 fermented sugarcane products (includes Madeira 100% sugarcane brandy and tafia) Lees and wastes (dried grains) from the brewing 58,840,130 86,214,099 86,214,099 1,165,783 kg and distilling industries 22 Quantities Pr Pr Value of Sales oduced Products Unit oduced Sold (Euros) 2008 (Rv) 2009 Other non-alcoholic drinks, not containing milk l 1,437,830 1,132,641 1,125,847 1,056,163 fat, includes currant syrup Brandies obtained from fruit distillation (includes l alc ? ? ? ? arbutus, pear, plum, fichus, and other fruits) 100% Other beverage industry products x x x x 5,486,164 Total Produced Products x x x x 2 469 069 706 Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) Table A5. Sector characterization in 2008 Gross Value Companies Employees Turnover Added 2008 Number % Number % Million ? % Million ? % Food and Drinks Industries 10,835 100% 111,408 100% 15,181 100% 2,822 100% Animal slaughtering, preparation, and conservation of meat and meat products 633 6% 16,814 15% 2,199 14% 332 12% Preparation and conservation of fish, crustaceans, and other mollusks 211 2% 6,668 6% 1,093 7% 151 5% Preparation and conservation of fruits and horticulture products 228 2% 3,020 3% 455 3% 86 3% Production of animal and vegetable oils and greases 500 5% 2,231 2% 1,101 7% 90 3% Dairy industry 439 4% 7,159 6% 1,703 11% 294 10% Processing of cereals and legume crops; Production of starch paste and flour and like products 299 3% 1,913 2% 764 5% 93 3% Manufacture of bakery products and other flour based products 6,875 63% 47,220 42% 1,773 12% 629 22% Manufacture of other food products 573 5% 7,628 7% 1,452 10% 314 11% Manufacture of food for animals 128 1% 3,432 3% 1,515 10% 135 5% Drinks Industry 949 9% 14,079 13% 2,993 20% 665 24% Source: National Institute of Statistics (INE) 23 24
Posted: 11 May 2011, last updated 12 May 2011

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