Food and Agricultural Import Regulations and Standards

An Expert's View about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in Russia

Posted on: 25 Feb 2012

This report highlights export certification requirements for Russia.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 12/30/2011 GAIN Report Number: RS1167 Russian Federation Food and Agricultural Import Regulations and Standards - Certification FAIRS Export Certificate Report Approved By: Scott Reynolds Prepared By: Staff Report Highlights: This report highlights export certification requirements for Russia. Please note that certification requirements have and will continue to undergo change as Russia reforms its regulations to meet Customs Union and soon WTO Accession commitments. Exporters are highly advised to verify the export certification requirements with their importer. Introduction In general, Russia does not accept generic veterinary certificates issued by the U.S. competent authorities, which certify products in compliance with U.S. standards. Rather, Russia requires veterinary certificates to detail several specific attestations in addition to including a catch-all “meets Custom Union requirements” (previously “meets Russian requirements”), which is generally a challenge for most commodities. The Russia-Kazakhstan-Belarus Custom Union requirements present considerable challenges to exporters, as they cover a wide range of goods of both animal and plant origin, are extremely prescriptive, and in general are neither based on risk assessments nor international standards. In order to export to Russia, considerable documentation is required from both governments and must be provided in Russian. Cargo is routinely detained for certification errors. Exporters who have the most success in Russia work with experienced brokers or importers. While this report does not provide detailed information on export health certificates issued by U.S. Government agencies, up-to-date information is available from the relevant agencies on their websites. Corruption Russia is ranked 143 out of 182 countries on the Corruption Perception Index, and is tied with nine other countries with a score of 2.4 out of 10.0. Counterfeiting and alteration of shipping documents, including import permits and export health certificates, constitute a serious problem in Russia. Traders are routinely confronted by both corrupt officials seeking to extort bribes in return for turning a blind eye to non-existent or obviously fake documents, and schemes by dishonest traders to deceive Russian officials with fraudulent documents. American exporters should be aware that under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and other applicable U.S. and Russian laws, payment of bribes and engaging in or abetting fraud in the course of a foreign trade transaction is a criminal act. Transition Period Russia remains in a transition period as it both reforms its regulations to meet Customs Union and soon WTO Accession commitments. The final and transitional provisions of the Customs Union’s “Uniform requirements of products under veterinary control” allow imports of products accompanied by veterinary certificates which differ from the “Uniform Requirements” until January 1, 2013, if they were initialed before July 1, 2010. The validity of these certificates can be indefinitely extended if the United States requests to renegotiate them prior to January 1, 2013. Products accompanied by certificates initialed between July 1, 2010 and December 1, 2010 may be imported and consumed until January 1, 2013 only in the territory of the initialing Customs Union Party. Section I. List of All Export Certificates Required By Government: The following export certificates are currently issued and/or remain valid in order to facilitate U.S. exports to Russia. Exporters should consult with their importers to determine which certificates are needed for goods they intend to ship. Health Certificates – Sanitary (Veterinary) USDA/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Veterinary Services/Animal Veterinary certificate for breeding cattle exported from United States to the Russian Federation (approved March 31, 2008) Veterinary certificate for breeding sheep and goats exported from United States to the Russian Federation (approved December 8, 2009) Veterinary certificate for breeding pigs exported from the United States to the Russian Federation (approved March 31, 2008) Veterinary certificate for slaughter pigs exported from the United States to the Russian Federation (approved March 31, 2008) Veterinary certificate for fattening pigs exported from the United States to the Russian Federation (approved March 31, 2008) Veterinary certificate for breeding, usage and sport horses exported from United States to the Russian Federation (approved March 31, 2008) Veterinary certificate for temporary admission of horses from the United States to the Russian Federation for participation in international competitions for a period less than 90 days (approved March 31, 2008) Veterinary certificate for mink exported from United States to the Russian Federation (approved March 16, 2007) Veterinary certificate for bovine semen exported to the Russian Federation (approved March 3, 2006) Veterinary certificate for bovine embryos from United States to the Russian Federation (approved March 31, 2008) Veterinary certificate for day-old chicks, turkey poults, ducklings, goslings and incubate eggs of this species exported into the Russian Federation (approved March 29, 2005) [Note: Since the certificate is not on the VPSS website, this may result in problems crossing the border.] For more information, visit http://www.fsvps.ru/fsvps/importExport/usa/sertificates.html or http://www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals/animal_russian_federation.shtml. USDA/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Veterinary Services/Animal Products Veterinary certificate for hides, horn and hoof, furs, sheep pelt, lambskin, wool and goat fluff, bristle, horse hair, down and feather of chicken, duck, goose and other poultry, and technical gelatin exported from United States to the Russian Federation (approved June 30, 2009) Veterinary certificate for fresh-dry raw material for fur production exported from the United States to Russia (approved October 24, 2005) [Note: Since the certificate is not viewable on the VPSS website, this may result in problems crossing the border.] Veterinary certificate for non-edible (technical) animal protein-free rendered fats exported to the Russian Federation (approved November 23, 2004) Veterinary certificate for import of fodder and fodder supplements of animal origin (approved July 15, 2004) Veterinary certificate for dog and cat feeds exported from United States to the Russian Federation (approved June 2, 2010) Veterinary certificate for feed and feed additives for non-productive animals, not containing components of animal origin exported from United States to the Russian Federation (approved June 30, 2010) Veterinary certificate for feed for aquarium and decorative fishes exported from the United States to the Russian Federation (approved June 30, 2010) Veterinary certificate for livestock raw materials, that are not derived from ruminants, and meant for pet food manufacturing, exported to the Russian Federation (approved February 16, 2006) Veterinary certificate for milk and milk products, derived from cattle, exported into the Russian Federation (approved April 29, 1993) [Note: Since the certificate is not on the VPSS website, this may result in problems crossing the border.] Veterinary certificate for non-fat dry milk, derived from the cattle, exported into the Russian Federation [Note: Since the certificate is not on the VPSS website, this may result in problems crossing the border.] For more information, visit http://www.fsvps.ru/fsvps/importExport/usa/sertificates.html or http://www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/products/product_russia.shtml. USDA/Food Safety Inspection Service FSIS Form 9450-3 (04/21/2010) Veterinary certificate for frozen pork meat and pork by- products exported from the U.S. to the Russian Federation (approved February 27, 2010) FSIS Form 9450-4 (03/03/2011) Veterinary certificate for export of poultry meat to the Russian Federation (approved March 10, 2006) o Letterhead Certificate for Pathogen Reduction Treatment Used for Poultry and Poultry Products Exported to the Russian Federation (approved September 2, 2010) FSIS Form 9450-5 (05/25/2010) Veterinary certificate for beef and beef by-products exported from the U.S. to the Russian Federation (approved November 2, 2006) FSIS Form 9450-6 (7/95) Veterinary certificate for pork intestine raw material, exported into the Russia Federation (approved June 23, 1995) o FSIS Form 9060-7 (8/13/2008) Animal Casings Export Certificate for Countries Requiring Ante-mortem, Post-mortem, and Fit-for-Human-Food Statements FSIS Form 9450-7 (7/95) Veterinary certificate for prepared meat products exported into the Russian Federation (approved June 23, 1995) FSIS Form 9450-11 (03/04/1999) Veterinary certificate for horse meat exported into the Russian Federation (approved April 20, 1999) FSIS Form 9450-12 (4/18/2001) Veterinary Certificate for Raw Materials of Animal Origin for Pet Food Manufacturing Exported to the Russian Federation [Note: Since the certificate is not on the VPSS website, this may result in problems crossing the border.] For more information, visit http://www.fsvps.ru/fsvps/importExport/usa/sertificates.html or http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Regulations_&_Policies/Russia_Requirements/index.asp. U.S. Department of Commerce/National Marine Fisheries Service Veterinary certificate for fish and sea products of their processing subjected to thermal treatment, exported to the Russian Federation (approved in 2005) For more information, visit http://www.fsvps.ru/fsvps/importExport/usa/sertificates.html or http://www.seafood.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Health Certificates – Phytosanitary USDA/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Plant Protection and Quarantine PPQ Form 577 (Feb 2001) Phytosanitary Certificate PPQ Form 578 (Feb 2001) Processed Plant Products PPQ Form 579 (Feb 2001) Phytosanitary Certificate for Reexport For more information, visit http://www.fsvps.ru/fsvps/importExport/usa/phyto.html or http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/plants/plant_exports/export_certificates_forms.shtml. USDA/Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration LibertyLink Rice Proficiency Program Letter and Test Results (to accompany Phytosanitary Certificate) Other Certificates Private Certificate of Origin Certificate of Quality (and Safety) U.S. Department of the Interior/US Fish and Wildlife Service Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Export Certificate Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Reexport Certificate For more information, visit http://www.fws.gov/international/DMA_DSA/CITES/CITES_home.html Section II. Purpose of Specific Export Certificate(s) Health Certificates Export certificates are required and verified for consistency with Russian-Kazakh-Belarusian Customs Union regulations at the external border of the Customs Union to protect public and animal health (veterinary certificates) as well as the environment (phytosanitary certificates). Health certificates are also used to determine product origin. The Russian Ministry of Agriculture’s Federal Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance Service, (VPSS or Rosselkhoznadzor) is responsible for veterinary and phytosanitary control in Russia as well as on Russia’s external border of the Customs Union. The Russian Ministry of Health’s Federal Service for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Well-Being of the Ministry of Health and Social Development (Rospotrebnadzor) is responsible for sanitary-epidemiological control in Russia but is not located on the border. In practice, VPSS enforces sanitary-epidemiological control over products at the border when those products are also under sanitary-veterinary control. For product transiting Kazakhstan or Belarus and destined for Russia, sanitary and phytosanitary control, including the verification of valid certificates to enter Russia, is performed at their respective external borders of the Customs Union. Veterinary Certificates According to the Uniform procedure for veterinary control at the customs border of the Customs Union, products contained in the Uniform list of products under veterinary control require a veterinary certificate (except veterinary drugs and feed additives of chemical and microbiological synthesis need only be accompanied by documents issued by the manufacturer confirming their quality and safety). Veterinary certificates should be consistent with the Uniform requirements of products under veterinary control as well as the Uniform veterinary certificates for import to the customs territory of the Customs Union. Veterinary certificates are also used to enforce the Uniform sanitary-epidemiological and hygienic requirements for products contained in the Uniform list of products under sanitary-epidemiological control at the customs border and in the customs territory of the Customs Union. Phytosanitary Certificates According to the Procedure for phytosanitary control at the customs border of the Customs Union, products defined as “high phytosanitary risk” in the List of products under phytosanitary control require a phytosanitary certificate. Other Certificates Certificates of Quality (and Safety) The manufacturer’s certificate of quality (and safety) is used to determine whether the product conforms to product specifications of the contract and quality requirements of the Customs Union and Russia. It is not a substitute for the applicable U.S. Government-issued health certificates. It is, rather, a document used by the importer to obtain a certificate or declaration of conformity, which attests to compliance with the sanitary-epidemiological requirements. Certificates of Origin Russian Customs officials use certificates of origin as proof to determine import tariffs and to prevent importation of products from countries under import restrictions unrelated to sanitary or phytosanitary issues. CITES Certificates CITES control is guided by Appendices I, II, and III. The export of Appendix-I and –II specimens requires an export permit. Such a permit may be granted when the export will not be detrimental to the species’ survival and specimens were legally acquired. For Appendix-III species originating from the country that listed it, an export permit is required. An export permit may be granted when the Management Authority determines that the specimens were not obtained in contravention of that country’s laws for the protection of animals and plants. A re-export certificate is required for the export of CITES-listed specimens that were previously imported, including items subsequently converted to manufactured goods. A certificate may be issued when evidence of legal import has been provided. If you were the original importer of the wildlife or plant, you need to provide a copy of the canceled CITES permit that accompanied the shipment into the United States and, for animal specimens, the cleared Declaration for Importation (Form 3-177) for that shipment. If you were not the importer, you must provide copies of the importer’s documents, as well as documents that show you purchased the wildlife or plant from the original importer, or a record of sequential transactions. If a species meets the criteria for bred-in-captivity or artificially propagated as outlined in CITES resolutions, the exporting country may issue an exemption certificate (bred-in-captivity facts sheet is available). For Appendix-I specimens, no CITES import permit is required. For Appendix-III specimens that originated from a country other than the listing country, a certificate of origin is needed to export the specimen. A certificate can be issued if the specimen was legally obtained within the exporting country. Section III. Specific Attestations Required on Export Certificate(s) All certificates must be in Russian. For products under veterinary control, please consult the importer’s import (veterinary) permit for specific conditions. For products under sanitary-epidemiological control, the Customs Union typically requires the corresponding veterinary certificates contain the following two attestations: “Microbiological, chemical and toxicological, and radiological indicators of [commodity] comply with the veterinary and sanitary requirements of the Customs Union.” “Package and packaging material are used only once and comply with requirements of the Customs Union.” For phytosanitary certificates, please consult APHIS’ Phytosanitary Export Database (PExD). Section IV. Government Certificate Legal Entry Requirements Customs Union regulations require export certificates accompany their cargo. Customs Union regulations also require health certificates must be issued before the product is exported. As a result, VPSS refuses to accept replacement and in-lieu-of certificates issued after the date of export. Application of this regulation is inconsistent, as the Customs Union is also bound to adhere to international recommendations that can support the issue of such certificates. Exporters wishing to obtain either a replacement or in-lieu-of certificate for purposes of correcting errors or redirecting cargo to Russia should work with their importer and do so at their own risk. VPSS enforces a zero-tolerance for certificate errors and such instances commonly arise from inaccurate information provided to the federal authority issuing the certificate (e.g., wrong container numbers, mistyped establishment numbers). Errors commonly result in significant demurrage costs and can lead to a shipment being turned back. Suppliers' and manufacturers' export declarations are not accepted as an export health certificate. Derogations of export certification requirements are approved on a case-by-case basis. Exporters seeking derogations should work with their importer. Section V. Other Certification/Accreditation Requirements Certificates All other certificates required by the Russian government are the responsibility of the importer. Accredited Supplier Lists In general, products under veterinary control are required to come from approved supplier lists. VPSS currently maintains such lists for the following commodities: Feed and feed additives Feed and feed additives for dogs and cats Fish and seafood Beef (including offal and fat) Pork (including offal and fat) Poultry (including offal and fat) Prepared meat and poultry Hatching eggs and day-old chicks The final and transitional provisions of the Unified Procedure for veterinary control at the customs border of the Customs Union exempts the following products from the list requirement: Animals and genetic material Bee products Raw materials of animal origin (skin, hair, raw furskins, feathers, etc.) Animal feed and feed additives of vegetable origin Composite products Gelatin, etc.
Posted: 25 February 2012

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