Record Production Higher than Previously Forecast

An Expert's View about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in Russia

Posted on: 31 Oct 2011

FAS-Moscow significantly increased its sugar beet production projection for 2011 in response to higher than expected area, good weather, and reported harvest yields to date. As a result, the increased production estimate will further displace raw sugar imports in 2011/12.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 10/3/2011 GAIN Report Number: RS1145 Russian Federation Sugar Semi-annual Record Production Higher than Previously Forecast Approved By: Scott Reynolds Prepared By: Morgan Haas, Mikhail Maksimenko Report Highlights: FAS-Moscow significantly increased its sugar beet production projection for 2011 in response to higher than expected area, good weather, and reported harvest yields to date. As a result, the increased production estimate will further displace raw sugar imports in 2011/12. However, expectations for refined sugar imports remain unchanged as Russia currently has agreements in place with two major suppliers ? Belarus and Moldova. Summary FAS-Moscow significantly increased its sugar beet production projection for 2011 in response to higher than expected area, good weather, and reported harvest yields to date. As a result, the increased production estimate will further displace raw sugar imports in 2011/12. However, expectations for refined sugar imports remain unchanged as Russia currently has agreements in place with two major suppliers ? Belarus and Moldova. Table 1a. Russia: Sugar Beets, Area, Production, and Utilization (1,000 HA, 1,000 MT) 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 Sugar Beets Russia M arket Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begin: Jan 2011 Market Year Begin: Jan 2012 Old Post New Post Old post New Post Old post New Post Area Planted 1,050 1,050 1,160 1,160 1,200 1,290 Area Harvested 900 900 910 910 1,130 1,190 Production 24,800 24,800 21,500 21,500 30,000 37,000 Total Supply 24,800 24,800 21,500 21,500 30,000 37,000 Utilization for Sugar 24,800 24,800 21,500 21,500 30,000 37,000 Total Distribution 24,800 24,800 21,500 21,500 30,000 37,000 Table 1b. Russia: Sugar, Production, Supply, and Distribution (1,000 MT Raw Value) 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 Sugar, Centrifugal Russia M arket Year Begin: Oct 2009 Market Year Begin: Oct 2010 Market Year Begin: Oct 2011 USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Beginning Stocks 481 481 399 399 374 400 Beet Sugar Production 3,444 3,444 2,980 2,996 4,175 4,800 Total Sugar Production 3,444 3,444 2,980 2,996 4,175 4,800 Raw Imports 1,949 1,949 2,600 2,600 1,725 1,400 Refined Imp.(Raw Val) 274 274 350 350 275 275 Total Imports 2,223 2,223 2,950 2,950 2,000 1,675 Total Supply 6,148 6,148 6,329 6,345 6,549 6,875 Refined Exp.(Raw Val) 34 34 50 5 100 200 Total Exports 34 34 50 5 100 200 Human Dom. Cons. 5,700 5,700 5,890 5,925 6,010 6,230 Other Disappearance 15 15 15 15 15 15 Total Use 5,715 5,715 5,905 5,940 6,025 6,245 Ending Stocks 399 399 374 400 424 430 Total Distribution 6,148 6,148 6,329 6,345 6,549 6,875 *New crop beet sugar production in August and September assumed to occur in October for PSD calculation. Production In Russia, sugar beets are planted April-May, harvested August-November, and processed September- February. Imported raw cane sugar is refined January-August. Chart 1. Russia: Refined Sugar Production by Source, 1,000 MT Source: Rosstat, Social and Economic Situation in Russia, various Sugar Beets Russia increased 2011 planted area of sugar beets to a record 1.29 million hectares (11.2 percent growth). Considering the growth of sugar beet area, good weather conditions, and reported harvest yields to date, a new record for sugar beet production of 37.0 MMT (72.1 percent growth) is now well within reach and far exceeds state targets. Private farms increased their share of total area to 13.7 percent (12.1 percent in 2010) at the expense of large agricultural enterprises. Rainy weather in some regions of Russia August ? September have led to some harvest delays and may lead to reduced beet yield there. Refined Sugar Reflecting the expected record harvest, FAS-Moscow has increased its beet sugar production projection to 4.8 MMT. The Russian Union of Sugar Producers informed that 71 refineries had started processing sugar beets as of September 19, 2011 (in 2010 ? 54 refineries). They have stored 8.5 MMT (in 2010 ? 4.5 MMT) and processed 7.3 MMT (in 2010 ? 4.0 MMT) of sugar beets and produced 852,200 MT of sugar from it (in 2010 ? 482,800 MT). Since processing started, sugar recovery rate stands at 12.11 percent (in 2010/11 ? 12.81 percent). The remaining sugar beet stocks at sugar refineries warehouses were 1.1 MMT (in 2010 ? 544,900 MT). According to information from sugar beet harvesting regions, some do not have enough sugar refining capacity to process the record beet harvest. Local governments are negotiating with refineries to prolong the beet processing period through the winter. Since sugar beet stocks from the 2011 harvest will be higher at the beginning of 2012 compared to 2011, refineries are expected to push back the start of the raw cane sugar refining season. Trade Imports Russia will continue to import raw and refined sugar in 2011/2012 to support its growing sugar- containing food product sector. Nonetheless, in response to expected beet sugar production, FAS- Moscow decreased its raw sugar import forecast for 2011/2012 by 18.8 percent. The 2010/11 projections for both raw and refined sugar are unchanged. As expected, high prices and a Customs Union Commission decision to temporarily lower the import duty for raw sugar from $140/MT to $50/MT in the period from March 1 to April 30, 2011 propelled imports. Brazil remains the dominant supplier of raw cane sugar to Russia, with its market share reaching 87 percent in the first three quarters of 2010/11. Russia and Moldova signed an agreement on agricultural cooperation, including sugar exports to Russia in July 2011. Exports FAS-Moscow doubled its sugar export forecast for 2011/12 in response to the increase in expected domestic supply and more competitive prices. According to officials from the Sugar Producers Union (Russugar, www.rossahar.ru), the situation may allow Russia to export beet sugar to Ukraine and Central Asia for the first time in the last 12 years. Sugar exports through the first three quarters of 2010/11 have been virtually non-existent resulting from the poor harvest of 2010; however, some new crop sugar could find its way to the export market during the end of the fourth quarter. Consumption Sugar consumption continues to grow in Russia, supported by a growing and increasingly protected food and beverage sector. Prices Sugar prices have fallen significantly since reaching their highest level in early February 2011. At the end of August 2011, beet sugar production outpaced consumption, helping to lower wholesale prices. Russia?s Institute of Agricultural Marketing (IKAR, www.ikar.ru) reported at the end of August, the production cost of cane sugar processing was about RUR34/kg ($1.13/kg) while beet sugar wholesale prices in Krasnodar, the largest beet sugar producer in the South of Russia was about RUR23/kg ($0.77/kg). Chart 2. Russia: Refined Sugar Processor?s and Retail Prices, RUR/kg Source: Ministry Agriculture http://www.mcx.ru/navigation/docfeeder/show/169.htm Caramel Duties Imports of sugar confectionary have grown steady over recent years. In reaction, the GOR issued Resolution #445 on June 3, 2011, ?On measures directed at protection of economic interests of the Russian caramel producers.? The Resolution establishes a special three-year customs duty of $294.1/MT on caramel for custom codes 1704.90.710.0, 1704.90.750.0, 1806.90.500.1, and 1806.90.500.2. This import duty is not applied on caramel imports from Belarus, Kazakhstan, and countries that fall under Russia?s system of preferences, excluding China and Turkey. Stocks State Reserves The GOR released 160,000 MT of sugar stocks from the State Reserves to stabilize sharply rising sugar prices in late 2010 - early 2011. IKAR has called for the State Reserves to re-purchase this volume in the autumn of 2011 in order to minimize downward price pressure in MY 2011/12. Russugar officials also believe it is necessary to add white sugar to the list of products the State can purchase during the period of seasonal overproduction and sold during the period of greatest demand. They believe it will stimulate farmers to invest in the application of modern agricultural technology as they will be more confident in repaying investment loans. According to the official newspaper of the Russian government (www.rg.ru), Russia is considering measures that will allow the use of State Reserve stocks to intervene in emergency situations. The Ministry of Economic Development (MED) identifies two options: (1) selling goods on the market through a stock exchange or (2) transferring goods directly to regional State Reserves to eliminate regional disparities in supply and demand. GOR officials are inclined to the second option. IKAR and Russugar prefer the first option, which is considered by them to be more transparent and in line with the Law "On State Commodity Reserves". This Law was amended in 2010 and required the use of State Reserve resources to regulate the market in the form of trade interventions. However, this mechanism is not finalized and is currently applied only for grain intervention. MED will study the mechanism and make a determination by the end of 2011. According to the newspaper, the State Reserves will use their resources in emergencies that pose a threat to the welfare of the population. Policy State Support MED confirmed in its forecast for the Development of Russia in 2012-2014, issued at the end of September 2011, the State Program ?Development of the Beet Sugar Complex of Russia, 2010-2012? is implementing several measures to support producers and processors of sugar beets. These include interest rate subsidies for the construction or modernization of sugar refineries and seed processing facilities as well as partial compensation for the costs of mineral fertilizers and crop protection chemicals. Additionally, the GOR supports producers through the current raw sugar import regime. MED acknowledged all these measures are directed at increasing producers' interests in obtaining optimal profitability associated with the marketing of beet sugar and also increased investment attractiveness of beet sugar production. Investment Projects As noted above, some regions are experiencing harvests larger than their current processing capacity. The Russian Ministry of Agriculture (MinAg) considered this situation at a recent meeting with sugar beet producers and processors. MinAg noted the medium and long term development of sugar beet processing industry is a priority under the draft State Program for Agriculture Development until 2020. In order to stretch the time period of sugar beet processing and thus reduce daily processing loads on refineries, MinAg recommended Russugar and managers of sugar beet producing and processing organizations sign long-term contracts (at least 3 years) for supplying sugar beets to processing refineries as well as provide measures to encourage agricultural producers to start harvesting sugar beets earlier in 2012. To increase refining capacity, MinAg is presently selecting economically-important regional investment projects for construction, renovation, and modernization of sugar mills. MinAg reported, in 2011, the federal budget allocated RUR 125.8 million ($4.3 million) to subsidize investment. MinAg selected three projects in 2011, valued at more than RUR1 billion ($31.3 million) and is currently considering 12 more projects, valued at RUR1.2 billion ($37.5 million). In 2010, MinAg selected 29 projects for construction, reconstruction and modernization of sugar refineries, valued at RUR4.52 billion ($150 million), including the following: Region Company The Republic of Tatarstan JSC "Nurlatsky Sugar" Ryazan oblast OOO "Sotnitsynsky Sugar Plant" Voronezh Region JSC "Olhovatsky Sugar Factory" OOO "Pereleshin Sugar Factory" Tambov region OOO "Znamensky sugar factory" JSC "Sugar factory" Zherdevsky " Lipetsk region OOO "Agrosnab" JSC "Gryazi sugar factory" OJSC "Agroindustrial Association" Aurora " Belgorod region OOO "Chernyansky sugar factory" JSC "Nika" JSC "Valuykisahar" Altai JSC "Cheremnovsky sugar factory" Stavropol Territory JSC "Stavropolsahar" Saratov Region OOO "Balashov Sugar Factory" Krasnodar Kray JSC "Vikor" JSC "Sugar-cheese-making factory "Leningradskiy" Technical Regulations In accordance with the Russian Law on Technical Regulations of 2002, Russia drafted a Technical Regulation on Sugar in November 2009. As referenced, the document should be harmonized with international standards of Codex Alimentarius, European legislation, and national standards for the products of the sugar industry. Considerable work should also be done to harmonize standards with ISO (International Organization for sugar) and ICUMSA (International Commission for Uniform Methods of Sugar Analysis). The draft Technical Regulation can be found at http://www.rossahar.ru/scdp/page?als=2379441. This Technical Regulation is not on the priority list of the GOR or the Customs Union. Customs Union member-countries Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan are currently working on more urgent Technical Regulations, including the Technical Regulation ?On Food Safety?. This Technical Regulation establishes sanitary requirements for sugar and confectionary products as well as requirements for individuals/entities involved in food production. Other Relevant Reports RS1118 Planting Intentions Indicate Record Beet Production in 2011 RS1071 Russia Sugar Production Down Support Measures Extended RS1067 Record High Planted Area Mitigated by Losses, Lower Yields SUGAR PRODUCTION TABLES Chart 3. Russia: Sugar Beet Production and Yield, 1990-2010 Source: Rosstat Table 2. Russia: Sugar Beet Production, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Sugar beet area, 1,000 Ha 1,065 819 823 1,160 1,290 --Agricultural enterprises, % 85.5 87.9 87.8 87.2 85.7 --Private farms, % 13.3 11.0 11.2 12.1 13.7 --Private households, % 1.2 1.1 1.0 0.7 0.6 Sugar beet harvest, 1,000 MT 28,236 29,000 24,800 22,300 37,000* Yield, MT/Ha 29.2 36.3 32.3 24.1 31.1* Source: Rosstat, Social and Economical Situation in Russia, June 2007-2011 *FAS-Moscow forecast Table 3. Russia: Major Target Indicators of the Sugar Development Program for 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 Sugar beet industry --Beet sugar production, MMT 3.73 3.91 4.32 --Beet acreage, 1,000 ha 859 895 981 --Beet yield, MT/ha 363 365 369 --Sugar content in beets, % 16.8 16.9 17.3 Sugar beet processing industry --Beet processing capacity, 1,000MT/day 302.3 310.6 386.0 --Volume of beet stocks, MMT 27.5 28.8 31.4 --Sugar extraction, % 13.56 13.58 13.76 --Beet losses on storage, % 3.6 3.3 3.0 Source: Ministry of Agriculture, ?Development of Sugar Beet Production Industry of Russia for 2010-2012? SUGAR BEET AND SUGAR PRICE TABLES Table 4. Russia: Prices for Sugar Beet and Sugar Beet Products as of September 16, 2011. Sale price Purchase (demand) price Sugar beet,RUR/MT 1,200--1,300 800-850 Dry beet pulp pellets 4,100 3,800 Syrup 1,000 800 Sugar, RUR/MT 21,300 - 22,600 n/a Source: Rossahar http://www.rossahar.ru Table 5. Russia: Average Refined Sugar Processor?s and Retail Prices, RUR/kilogram Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Processor Price, Refined Sugar (RUR/kg) 200 15.8 19.5 21.3 20.4 21.6 22.3 22.3 22.7 23.2 23.8 23.9 24.8 9 2 5 3 0 6 0 3 0 5 7 5 2 201 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.5 25.8 25.4 25.5 26.7 28.0 28.9 28.9 29.7 0 1 4 5 5 7 2 7 8 5 3 1 3 201 30.9 33.5 34.1 34.3 33.3 31.9 32.1 32.1 31.4 1 5 0 4 9 7 8 2 0 4 Retail Price, Refined Sugar (RUR/kg) 200 23.2 27.0 27.6 28.3 29.0 28.9 28.9 29.6 31.8 34.1 33.9 33.7 9 8 3 3 0 0 7 9 7 2 0 9 8 201 34.1 35.7 36.9 36.0 34.7 33.4 33.7 34.2 36.1 37.2 37.6 39.1 0 2 5 5 4 8 2 0 1 9 1 6 0 201 40.9 43.3 44.7 44.2 43.6 41.3 41.2 40.8 40.0 1 4 6 8 7 7 4 0 6 8 Source: Ministry of Agriculture, http://www.mcx.ru/navigation/page/show/205.htm SUGAR CONSUMPTION TABLES Table 6. Russia: Industrial Production of Sugar-Containing Products 2009 2010 ? (%) Ice cream and deserts (1,000MT) 326 387 18.7% Wafers, sweet cookies, crackers (1,000MT) 1,000 1,055 5.5% Cocoa, chocolate, and sugar-containing candies (1,000MT) 1,323 1,461 10.4% Table wines (million deciliters) 39.4 45.1 14.5% Soft drinks (million deciliters) 283 317 12.0% Source: Rosstat SUGAR TRADE TABLES Table 7a. Russia: Sugar Imports, 1,000 MT 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 4th/08 1st/09 2nd/09 3rd/09 Total 4th/09 1st/10 2nd/10 3rd/10 Total 4th/10 1st/11 2nd/11 17 Sugars 612.6 145.1 876.3 353.8 1,987.7 107.6 421.7 1,599.7 65.9 2,194.9 269.3 635.5 1,578.6 Cane Sugar, Raw, Solid Form, W/O Added 170111 Flav/Color 557.2 91.2 812.9 301.8 1,763.1 45.7 366.7 1,534.8 1.4 1,948.6 169.7 568.7 1,519.1 Brazil 511.5 89.6 645.4 243.0 1,489.5 8.5 317.1 1,311.3 0.0 1,636.8 147.1 540.9 1,266.8 Cuba 0.0 0.0 122.2 20.6 142.8 0.0 0.0 80.9 0.0 80.9 0.0 0.0 45.8 Thailand 41.3 0.0 0.0 16.4 57.7 10.5 7.2 23.1 0.0 40.8 0.0 0.0 123.6 Cane/Beet Sugar, Refined, Solid, Added 170191 Flav/Color 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.1 0.1 0.1 Cane/Beet Sug Chem Pure Sucrose Refind 170199 Nesoi 15.9 26.1 28.7 20.4 91.1 18.7 14.7 16.8 22.1 72.3 43.2 15.8 11.5 EU-27 12.6 6.0 3.4 5.4 27.3 10.6 13.7 15.8 13.0 53.1 10.7 6.1 4.5 Moldova 0.0 13.2 11.6 6.2 31.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.7 5.7 23.3 2.0 0.0 Brazil 1.8 4.5 6.2 6.2 18.7 1.5 0.3 0.0 2.0 3.8 7.1 6.0 4.7 Lactose & Lactose Syrup Cont 99% Lactse 170211 By Wt 1.4 1.4 2.3 3.0 8.2 3.2 3.9 3.9 5.6 16.6 7.1 5.1 3.9 Lactose In Solid Form And Lactose Syrup, 170219 Nesoi 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 Maple Sugar And 170220 Maple Syrup 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Glucose (Dextrose), Under 20% Fructose In Dry 170230 Form 10.4 8.6 11.3 8.7 39.0 9.8 9.3 11.0 5.3 35.4 13.1 14.4 12.4 Glucose & Glucose Syrup Containing 20- 170240 49% Fructose 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 Chemically Pure Fructose In Solid 170250 Form 1.7 0.7 2.4 1.3 6.0 1.8 1.8 2.4 1.4 7.3 1.5 2.6 3.0 Fructose, Nesoi & Syrup, Ov 50% Fructose In 170260 Dry Fm 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.1 0.1 Sugar, Nesoi, Including Invert 170290 Sugar & Syrup 4.8 2.4 3.4 2.5 13.1 7.0 6.8 11.3 11.6 36.8 11.3 7.8 5.9 Cane Molasses From Extraction Or Refining Of 170310 Sugar 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Chewing Gum, Whether Or Not 170410 Sugar Coated 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.2 Sugar Confection (Incl Wh Choc), 170490 No Cocoa, Nesoi 20.8 14.3 14.9 15.6 65.6 21.0 18.1 19.1 18.0 76.3 22.8 20.4 22.0 EU-27 13.1 6.4 7.0 7.8 34.3 9.8 6.6 6.6 5.6 28.7 8.6 6.4 6.9 Ukraine 2.7 5.1 4.9 4.0 16.7 5.9 7.7 6.7 8.7 29.1 9.7 8.8 10.6 China 3.0 1.7 1.6 2.0 8.3 2.9 1.6 2.4 2.5 9.5 2.9 2.7 2.8 NOTE: Excludes Belarus (entire time series) and Kazakhstan (since July 2010) Source: Global Trade Information Services Table 7b. Russia: Refined Sugar Imports from Belarus, 1,000MT Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Total MY 2008/09 6.5 9.4 4.6 20.2 14.9 13.5 13.1 18.1 16.7 8.6 10.9 9.5 146.0 MY 2009/10 11.4 14.0 9.0 18.5 20.7 7.9 22.0 14.5 22.2 14.4 8.0 17.4 180.0 MY 2010/11 17.6 13.0 12.0 15.0 16.3 17.9 13.4 18.6 21.3 n/a n/a n/a 145.1 Source: Rosstat, various Table 8. Russia: Sugar Exports, 1,000 MT 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 4th/0 1st/0 2nd/0 3rd/0 Tota 4th/0 1st/1 2nd/1 3rd/1 Tota 4th/1 1nd/1 2rd/1 8 9 9 9 l 9 0 0 0 l 0 1 1 Cane Sugar, Raw, Solid Form, W/O 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 170111 Added Flav/Color Beet Sugar, Raw, Solid Form, W/O 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 170112 Added Flav/Color Cane/Beet Sugar, Refined, 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 170191 Solid, Added Flav/Color Cane/Beet Sug Chem Pure 148. 7 42.0 39.4 4.7 7.1 19.3 0.2 31.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 170199 Sucrose Re 19.9 46.find 0 Nesoi Uzbekistan 12.0 26.2 17.8 15.7 71.7 0.4 0.7 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Tajikistan 3.1 10.3 16.3 8.7 38.4 2.8 2.6 5.2 0.0 10.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 Turkmenistan 3.0 6.7 2.1 1.9 13.7 0.0 3.6 1.6 0.0 5.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 Kazakhstan 1.0 0.1 0.0 0.5 1.5 0.0 0.1 12.0 0.0 12.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Lactose & Lactose Syrup 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 170211 Co 0.nt 99% Lactse By Wt Lactose In Solid Form And 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 170219 Lactose Syrup, Nesoi Maple Sugar 170220 And Maple 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Syrup Glucose (Dextrose), Under 20% 0.2 0.1 0.7 1.0 2.1 2.8 4.1 1.9 3.0 11.8 0.6 0.6 0.5 170230 Fructose In Dry Form 170240 Glucose & 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.4 1.4 0.3 0.0 0.0 Glucose Syrup Containing 20- 49% Fructose Chemically Pure 170250 Fructose In Solid 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Form Fructose, Nesoi & Syrup, Ov 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 170260 50% Fructose In Dry Fm Sugar, Nesoi, 170290 Including Invert 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Sugar & Syrup Molasses From 294. 182. 170390 Extraction/Refin 164.5 42.6 40.4 46.7 102.7 33.8 15.7 30.5 60.2 2.6 6.3 3 8 g Sugar, Nesoi 119. 106. 57.8 17.8 24.6 19.4 63.5 22.0 8.2 12.5 26.0 1.4 6.3 EU-27 6 1 Vietnam 48.9 13.7 11.4 14.0 88.0 29.0 4.2 0.8 0.0 34.0 5.3 0.0 0.0 Ukraine 51.8 4.7 2.1 7.9 66.6 3.9 1.5 3.7 16.1 25.1 26.7 0.0 0.0 Turkey 9.7 0.0 1.1 7.5 18.3 40.0 15.1 5.4 12.5 73.0 15.2 0.0 0.0 Chewing Gum, 170410 Whether Or Not 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 1.0 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.5 0.1 0.1 0.1 Sugar Coated Sugar Confection (Incl 10.3 10.7 13.3 170490 W 6.6 4.3 5.6 6.3 22.7 6.1 5.5 12.3 8.3 32.2h Choc), No Cocoa, Nesoi NOTE: Excludes Belarus (entire time series) and Kazakhstan (since July 2010) Source: Global Trade Information Services SUGAR AND CONFECTIONARY SANITARY REQUIREMENTS Table 9. Draft Sanitary Requirements for Sugar and Confectionary Products Indicators Allowable levels, Notes mg/kg, not above Toxic elements - lead 0.5 Sugar, flour confectionery products 1.0 Sugary confectionery products, oriental sweets, chewing gum; chocolate and products from it; cacao beans and cacao-products; honey - arsenic 1.0 Sugar and sugary confectionery products, oriental sweets, chewing gum; chocolate and products from it; cacao beans and cacao-products 0.3 Flour confectionery products 0.5 Honey - cadmium 0.05 Sugar, honey 0.1 Sugary and flour confectionery products, oriental sweets, chewing gum 0.5 Chocolate and products from it; cacao-beans and cacao-products - mercury 0.01 Sugar and sugary confectionery products, oriental sweets, chewing gum 0,1 Chocolate and products from it; cacao-beans and cacao-products 0.02 Flour confectionery products Pesticides - HCH (?, ?, ?- 0.005 Sugar, honey isomers) 0.5 Cacao-beans and cacao-products 0.2 Flour confectionery products - DDT and its 0.005 Sugar, honey metabolites 0.02 Flour confectionery products 0.15 Cacao-beans and cacao-products Mycotoxins - aflatoxin ?1 0.005 Flour and sugary confectionery products, oriental sweets, chewing gum (for products containing nuts); chocolate and products from it; cacao beans and cacao- products - desoxynivalenol 0.7 Flour confectionery products 5-hydroxymethyl 25 Honey furfural Note: Sugary confectionery products, oriental sweets, chewing gum, chocolate and products from it: allowable HCH levels (?, ?, ?-isomers) and DDT and its metabolites are calculated based on the main type (types) of raw materials both based on a weight fraction and allowable levels of rated pesticides. Source: Customs Union, http://www.tsouz.ru/db/techreglam/Pages/pishevka.aspx
Posted: 31 October 2011

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