Dairy and Products Semi-annual

An Expert's View about Dairy Products in Russia

Posted on: 27 May 2012

The Russian dairy industry has demonstrated a better-than-expected start to 2012, increasing production.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 5/22/2012 GAIN Report Number: RS1232 Russian Federation Dairy and Products Semi-annual Production Starts 2012 Strong Approved By: Morgan Haas Prepared By: Morgan Haas, Mikhail Maksimenko Report Highlights: The Russian dairy industry has demonstrated a better-than-expected start to 2012, increasing production as prices continue to show resiliency to the onset of seasonally higher production. In addition to a favorable prices, output remains supported by slowing dairy herd contraction, new market access trade barriers, maintained levels of state support, higher per cow feed stocks, and improving milk yields and animal husbandry at agricultural enterprises. Nonetheless, Russia‟s dairy statistics as well as its support programs have recently come under increased scrutiny for gross inaccuracies and failure to reach production targets. Taken in combination with domestic uncertainties concerning Russia‟s pending WTO accession, the GOR is again entertaining new proposed support measures. Summary The Russian dairy industry has demonstrated a better-than-expected start to 2012, increasing production as prices continue to show resiliency to the onset of seasonally higher production. In addition to a favorable prices, output remains supported by slowing dairy herd contraction, new market access trade barriers, maintained levels of state support, higher per cow feed stocks, and improving milk yields and animal husbandry at agricultural enterprises. Nonetheless, Russia‟s dairy statistics as well as its support programs have recently come under increased scrutiny for gross inaccuracies and failure to reach production targets. Taken in combination with domestic uncertainties concerning Russia‟s pending WTO accession, the GOR is again entertaining new proposed support measures. Fluid Milk A higher revised 2012 milk production forecast reflects 4.5% stronger milk production in January- March compared to the previous year. In addition to a favorable prices, output remains supported by slowing dairy herd contraction, new market access trade barriers, maintained levels of state support, higher per cow feed stocks, and improving milk yields and animal husbandry at agricultural enterprises. Combined, federal and regional state programs allocated more than RUR27 billion ($900 million) for dairy cattle husbandry in 2011 and RUR94 billion ($3.1 billion) over 2008-2011. In 2012, the Ministry of Agriculture expects the amount of funds shall be roughly equivalent. Feed stocks were 39% higher as of April 1, 2012, compared to the April 1, 2011. Milk yield increased in modernized and new agricultural farms to 1,217 kilograms in January-March 2012 from 1,108 in January-March 2011. FAS Moscow increased inventories of dairy cows-in-milk for 2010, 2011, and 2012 following revisions by Russia‟s state statistical agency (Rosstat). In accordance with a producer-processor agreement, the raw milk price range is generally fixed at RUR12-16/liter in 2012. Raw milk prices remain stable but are edging slightly higher to RUR16/kg. At the end of April, the Ministry of Agriculture responded to producer concerns of alleged lower producer milk prices (coinciding with the start seasonally higher production) by charging the regional authorities to monitor Belarusian dairy imports to ensure compliance with their bilateral agreement on price and volume. In contrast to the retail market, 2012 raw milk prices remain below 2011. Graph 1. Fluid Milk Prices, RUR/kg Source: Rosstat Rosstat reported Russia produced 31.7 MMT of fluid milk in 2011. Agricultural enterprises accounted for 45.4% (44.9%) in total milk production in 2011 (2010) while private households produced 49.7% (50.4%). Milk yields at agricultural enterprises totaled 4,741 (4,589) kilograms in 2011 (2010). Table 1. Russia: Inventories, Fluid Milk Supply and Distribution, 1,000MT Dairy, 2010 2011 2012 Milk, Fluid MY Begin: Jan 2010 MY Begin: Jan 2011 MY Begin: Jan 2012 Russia USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Cows In Milk 8,450 8,858 8,405 8,650 8,390 8,580 Cows Milk Production 31,900 31,847 31,800 31,742 31,900 32,100 Total Production 31,900 31,847 31,800 31,742 31,900 32,100 Total Imports 190 190 210 206 220 225 Total Supply 32,090 32,037 32,010 31,948 32,120 32,325 Total Exports 10 10 5 5 5 5 Fluid Use Dom. Cons. 11,800 11,775 11,800 11,700 11,850 11,800 Factory Use Cons. 17,830 17,800 17,755 17,800 17,815 18,075 Feed Use Dom. Cons. 2,450 2,452 2,450 2,443 2,450 2,445 Total Dom. Cons. 32,080 32,080 32,005 31,943 32,115 32,320 Total Distribution 32,090 32,090 32,010 31,948 32,120 32,325 Cheese Through April 2012, production of cheese and cheese products was 6.0 percent higher while imports of all cheeses (including cottage cheese) was 2.1 percent lower, compared to January-April 2011. Cheese prices are beginning to trend lower in line with historical trends, but the market has so far resisted the traditional sharp summer decline, which is beginning to widen the gap of current prices above those of past years. Cheese production decreased to 425,359 MT in 2011 as processors began to face high milk prices and appeared to favor butter, cream, and milk powder production. The primary foreign suppliers were the EU (52%), Belarus (26%), and Ukraine (20%). Russia prohibited imports of cheese from several Ukrainian facilities in February 2012, which Russia claimed were in violation of its requirements, particularly for the alleged use of tropical oils in cheese production. Russia lifted restrictions from some facilities at the beginning of May 2012 following inspections. Russia and Ukraine also agreed to create a working group to address harmonization of technical regulations between the two countries, specifically related to cheese production. According to My Business Magazine (#139, December 2011), hard cheeses occupied 65% of total cheese trade in 2010, followed by cheese spreads (24%) and soft and lactic cheese (11%). Forty-one percent of customers were said to buy hard cheeses once or twice per week. The share of cheese marketed under private labels was 9% in 2011 and continues to grow, the source reported. Table 2. Russia: Cheese Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT Dairy, 2010 2011 2012 Cheese MY Begin: Jan 2010 MY Begin: Jan 2011 MY Begin: Jan 2012 Russia USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Beginning Stocks 11 11 11 11 12 12 Production 435 438 425 425 420 450 Total Imports 305 353 315 344 330 345 Total Supply 751 802 751 780 762 807 Total Exports 20 11 7 9 7 10 Human Dom. Cons. 720 780 732 759 743 785 Total Dom. Cons. 720 780 732 759 743 785 Total Use 740 791 739 768 750 795 Ending Stocks 11 11 12 12 12 12 Total Distribution 751 802 751 780 762 807 Butter Through April 2012, production of butter was 6.8 percent higher while imports were 22.8 percent lower, compared to January-April 2011. Butter prices remain steady, near the highs set at the end of 2011. Butter production increased to 216,273 MT in 2011. The primary foreign suppliers were Belarus (36%), New Zealand (27%), and the EU (24%). Table 3. Russia: Butter Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT (butter-equivalent) Dairy, 2010 2011 2012 Butter MY Begin: Jan 2010 MY Begin: Jan 2011 MY Begin: Jan 2012 Russia USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Beginning Stocks 12 12 7 11 7 12 Production 205 207 212 217 210 230 Total Imports 109 114 130 116 135 90 Total Supply 326 333 349 344 352 332 Total Exports 2 2 2 2 2 2 Domestic Consumption 317 320 340 330 343 320 Total Use 319 322 342 332 345 322 Ending Stocks 7 11 7 12 7 10 Total Distribution 326 333 349 344 352 332 Milk Powders NOTE: FAS Moscow has changed its estimation of milk powders after discovery that its previous estimates mistakenly included dry whey and milk replacer production and as well as concentrated/condensed milk trade from Belarus. Through April 2012, production of granulated milk powder was 22.0 percent higher while imports of concentrated milk and milk powder were 12.4 percent lower, compared to January-April 2011. In 2011, production of whole milk powder reached 49,863 MT, including 9,230 MT with 2-18% fat and 40,633 MT with ≥20% fat, and skim milk powder production reached 56,549 MT. Belarus held the dominant position in market share at 74% for WMP and 62% for NFDM, followed by the EU at 14% and 27%, respectively. Whole Milk Powder (WMP) Table 4. Russia: Whole Milk Powder Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT Dairy, 2010 2011 2012 Whole Milk Powder MY Begin: Jan 2010 MY Begin: Jan 2011 MY Begin: Jan 2012 Russia U S D A Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Production 55 40 65 50 68 60 Total Imports 55 41 50 20 45 15 Total Supply 110 81 115 70 113 75 Total Exports 2 2 2 2 2 2 Human Dom. Cons. 108 79 113 68 111 73 Total Dom. Cons. 108 79 113 68 111 73 Total Use 110 81 115 70 113 75 Total Distribution 110 81 115 70 113 75 Nonfat Dry Milk (NFDM) Table 5. Russia: Nonfat Dry Milk Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT 2010 2011 2012 Dairy, Milk MY Begin: Jan 2010 MY Begin: Jan 2011 MY Begin: Jan 2012 , Nonfat Dry Russia USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Production 70 42 85 57 90 70 Total Imports 180 117 185 71 180 60 Total Supply 250 159 270 128 270 130 Total Exports 0 0 0 0 0 0 Human Dom. Cons. 250 159 270 128 270 130 Total Dom. Cons. 250 159 270 128 270 130 Total Use 250 159 270 128 270 130 Total Distribution 250 159 270 128 270 130 Policy WTO Accession The Russian Ministry of Agriculture tasked the dairy industry associations and regions in April 2012 to prepare a “road map” for the development of Russia‟s dairy industry, reflecting existing and additional necessary measures. The National Dairy Producers Union proposed to increase the subsidy level from RUR3.0 to RUR5.0/ liter of milk produced as well as start a new subsidy of RUR25.0/kg of beef produced from 2013 to 2020 in order to counter alleged impacts from WTO accession. Upon Russia‟s WTO Accession in mid-2012, Russia‟s dairy sector is subject to market opening. Russia will immediately eliminate its current requirement for foreign suppliers to be on a GOR- approved supplier list. Also, over products from an average of 19.8% to 14.9% and a new tariff-rate quota will be administered for select modified whey. However, in April the Ministry of Agriculture requested the Russian dairy industry to submit proposals by June 1, 2012, to increase import duties on milk and dairy products in hopes of renegotiating its WTO commitments. Presidential Audit of the Ministry of Agriculture At the end of 2011, a Presidential audit of the Ministry of Agriculture showed that the target indicators for the dairy industry had not been met and, in particular, noted the questionable variations in official cattle inventories that had previously been used as the basis for distributing federal subsidies to the regions. The audit concluded that the creation of a new state program “On the Development of Agriculture, 2013-2020,” it should improve mechanisms for counting cattle inventories, increase support for milk producers, as well as tighten the rules on the use of powdered milk and vegetable oils in the manufacture of dairy products. Strategy for the Development of the Russian Food Industry to 2020 GOR Resolution #559R of April 17, 2012, approved the “Strategy for Development of the Russian Food Industry until 2020” and contains three main objectives relative to the dairy industry: increase production of dairy products from milk-based resources; decrease imports of milk and dairy product resources; and increase human consumption of dairy products. The Strategy notes production is carried out by more than 1,500 producers of various forms of ownership, including 500 large and medium size establishments. As well, average annual capacity of dairy processors in 2010 was 16.48 MMT (57% capacity utilization) for production of dairy products, 543,900 MT (63.4 percent) for the production of cheese and cheese products, and 614,400 MT (27.4 percent capacity utilization) for the production of butter and butter products. The Strategy also attempts to identify the perceived problems hindering the development of the dairy industry, including (1) the decline in raw milk production, (2) seasonality of production, (3) a low proportion of liquid premium milk, (4) lack of refrigeration systems on dairy farms, as well as (5) depreciation of fixed assets at dairy processors, most of which were built in 1970 - 1980 and do not meet modern requirements for energy efficiency and environmental protection, nor allow the processing of byproducts, including dry whey, lactose, milk protein concentrates, milk replacer, and nutritional and biologically active substances. By 2016, the Strategy targets production of butter – 267,000 MT, cheese and cheese products – 529,000 MT, and whole milk products to reach 12.5 MMT. In order to achieve this, the Strategy considers it necessary to build 19 new facilities and 142 renovated facilities for milk, butter, and cheese production as well as whey drying/processing at an estimated investment cost of RUR47,493 million, of which RUR33,245 million will be borrowed funds. Milk processing plants will have a targeted daily capacity of 200-500 MT. Ultimately by 2020, the Strategy targets production of milk to reach 38.2 MMT, butter – 280,000 MT, cheese and cheese products – 546,000 MT, and whole milk products – 13.5 MMT (whole milk equivalent). It also targets the commercialization of 1.0 MMT of whey. In total, the Strategy envisions the building of 64 new facilities for processing milk, cheese, and whey and the renovation of 296 existing facilities. The Strategy also calculated 2010 milk consumption at 247 kg per capita versus the recommended norm of 320-340 kilogram. [Note: Russia‟s Federal Service on Customers' Rights Protection and Human Well-being Surveillance estimates per capita consumption of 240 liters of milk instead of the recommended 340-360 liters. More specifically, Russia‟s Nutrition Institute developed the following recommended consumption norms: whole milk – 116 liters, butter – 6.1 kg, sour milk – 6.5 kg, cottage cheese – 8.8 kg, cheese – 6.1 kg, and ice cream – 8 kg.] Customs Union Technical Regulation “On Milk and Dairy Products” At the end of April 2012, Customs Union (CU) member countries discussed their major differences on the CU technical regulation “On milk and dairy products”. They agreed on the following: exclude “vegetable-milk containing products”; tighten tolerances for antibiotic residues (effective July 1, 2015), cancel categories of milk with establishment of maximum level of bacterial insemination and somatic sells content (effective July 1, 2017). Several issues were not resolved. Particularly, the Russian side pushed to reject reconstituted milk as equivalent to “drinking milk”. The issue will be elevated to consideration at the governmental level of the CU. CU member countries also continue to discuss the technical regulation as it relates to the sensitive issue of tropical oil use in dairy manufacturing. The Russian Ministry of Agriculture requested the urgent establishment of an interagency working group to monitor compliance with technical regulations on milk and dairy products and fight counterfeit products, especially in the case of small and medium-sized regional milk processing enterprises. According to the Ministry of Economic Development (MED) Russia has 2,000 dairy product producers, and 99.5% of them use vegetable oil to decrease production costs and compensate for a shortage of high-quality milk fat. MED concluded that Russia needs 968,000 MT of milk fat for the dairy industry while milk fat supplies account for only 601,000 MT, creating a 367,000 MT deficit being filled by vegetable fat. Such products remain popular among price-conscious, low-income consumers. MED noted the cost for sour cream where milk fat was substituted by vegetable oil is 50% lower. Production Tables Table 6. Russia: Production Costs per Liter of Milk, 2011 Units Average Industrial farm production 1 Total accounting office production costs RUR/kg 8.90-12.00 16.46-18.53 1.1 Direct costs RUR/kg 8.65-11.30 12.60-13.03 1.1.1 Feed costs RUR/kg 5.10-7.00 7.07-7.30 1.1.2 Salary RUR/kg 1.50-2.00 1.80-2.60 1.1.3 Transportation RUR/kg 0.70-0.80 1.06-1.50 1.1.4 Losses, culling, forced slaughter RUR/kg 0.42-0.50 0.90-1.10 1.1.5 Electricity, water, gas RUR/kg 0.35-0.40 0.63-0.70 1.1.6 Veterinary compounds RUR/kg 0.28-0.30 0.61-0.71 1.1.7 Equipment services and repair costs RUR/kg 0.30-0.60 0.53-0.58 1.2 Overhead expenses RUR/kg 0.25-0.30 0.30-0.5- 1.3 Depreciation of buildings, equipment and machinery RUR/kg 0.00-0.40 2.56-2.60 1.4 Partial cattle depreciation, that fits sell price RUR/kg 0.00-0.00 1.00-2.40 2 Sale price (with V.A.T. RUR/kg 10.50- 17.00-17.50 13.00 3 Profit (loss) RUR/kg 1.60-1.00 0.54-1.03 4 Profitability % 8.0-18.0 3.0-6.0 5 Management production costs (5.1+5.2+5.3+5.4) RUR/kg 12.50- 21.02-23.93 16.50 Difference between management and accounting costs RUR/kg 3.60-4.70 4.60-5.40 5.1 Accounting expenses on direct and overhead expenses+ RUR/kg 8.90-12.00 16.46-18.53 partial depreciation 5.2 Not subsidized % 0.20-0.60 0.65-1.00 5.3 Losses due to beef production, cow culling RUR/kg 1.50-1.85 1.81-2.10 5.4 Expenses for heifers and substitution calfes RUR/kg 1.90-2.20 2.10-2.30 6 Actual profits (losses) in dairy cattle breeding, including RUR/kg -2.30-(- -4.02-(-6.43) production of beef and own heifers 3.65) Source: National Dairy Producers Union Table 7. Russia: Milk Production and Cow Herd Jan-Apr 2011 Jan-Apr 2012 % Gross milk yield (in all kinds of farms), 1,000 MT 6,203.5 6,428.1 104.5 Number of cows at the end of the period 3,686.5 3,681.3 99.9 (in agricultural organizations), 1,000 head Source: Ministry of Agriculture Table 8. Russia: Production of Dairy Products, MT Jan-Apr 2011 Jan-Apr 2012 % Whole milk products (in milk equivalent) 2,649.5 2,809.5 106.0 Cheese and cheese products 92.6 98.1 106.0 Butter 44.1 47.1 106.8 Granulated milk powder 19.7 24.0 122.0 Source: Ministry of Agriculture Table 9. Russia: Production of Dairy Products, MT Product 2010 2011 Butter and Butter Paste 208,328 217,980 Butter 206,814 216,814 --Sweet Butter 200,980 209,607 --Acidified Butter 538 488 --Melted 755 752 Butter Paste from Cow's Milk 1,759 1,706 Cheese and Cottage Cheese, Total 1,124,413 1,110,245 Cheese and Cheese Products 437,498 425,359 --Soft cheese 18,415 18,640 --In-brine cheese 17,505 17,094 --Semi-hard cheese 86,208 92,586 --Hard cheese 101,150 100,692 --Processed cheese 144,313 123,190 Cheese Products 48,260 52,132 Whole Milk Products in Milk Equivalent, Total 10,872,241 10,577,900 --Fluid and pasty products for children 90,998 98,015 Drinking Milk, Whole 4,910,331 4,859,461 --For children 64,543 69,216 Acidified Products, except Sour Cream and Cottage Cheese 2,355,376 2,290,179 --Kefir 1,044,856 1,030,457 --Yogurt 734,647 703,469 --Ryazhenka (Fermented Baked Milk) 215,570 212,947 --Varenets (Fermented Baked Milk) 22,143 21,025 --Acidophilus (Fermented Milk) 6,662 8,097 For children 46,343 53,100 --Buttermilk 20,691 20,769 Cream, Total 78,713 80,760 Sour Cream and Products, Total 535,783 533,486 --from 10% to 14% fat 28,025 25,391 --from 15% to 34% fat 497,545 496,524 Cottage Cheese 392,236 381,038 --for children 26,455 28,799 --Quark-grained 21,940 20,849 --Mass of Curd 50,754 45,170 --Cottage Cheese Products, Total 276,554 299,250 WMP, dried cream and dried milk mixture, Total 57,155 66,842 --WMP from 2% to 18% fat 8,883 9,230 --WMP from 20% or more fat 30,992 40,633 --Milk powder for children 7,875 8,267 --Milk powder mixes for children 9,405 8,712 SMP, milk replacer and whey powder 75,968 103,157 --SMP 41,810 56,549 --Dry milk replacer 1,567 5,915 --Whey powder 32,591 40,693 Ice cream 381,278 334,712 Condensed Milk, Total (cans) 879,081 853,492 --Condensed Milk 587,488 570,727 --Condensed Cream 2,889 2,783 --Condensed milk products in food and food additives 286,437 278,790 Source: Russian Dairy Union Trade Tables Table 10. Russia: Imports of Milk & Cream (0401) 2010 2011 Jan-Mar (MT) Partner Country US$ MT US$ MT 2011 2012 World 143,930,734 189,943 175,285,381 205,644 n/a n/a Belarus 97,758,300 162,373 131,442,700 178,504 n/a n/a EU-27 45,995,420 27,482 43,826,018 27,128 8,140 6,729 Source: Global Trade Atlas (excludes Kazakhstan since mid-2010) Table 11. Russia: Imports of Butter (040510, 040590) 2010 2011 Jan-Mar (MT) Partner Country US$ MT US$ MT 2011 2012 World 415,040,951 112,883 499,533,848 114,197 n/a n/a Belarus 181,846,700 40,795 193,524,900 40,754 n/a n/a EU-27 131,780,129 32,846 141,529,376 26,887 10,497 5,570 New Zealand 67,994,243 27,111 100,600,488 30,550 13,240 5,298 Argentina 8,876,490 3,044 22,069,647 5,082 992 1,313 Uruguay 4,582,188 2,033 21,958,075 5,271 988 425 Australia 9,111,706 3,237 12,339,722 3,756 3,042 399 Source: Global Trade Atlas (excludes Kazakhstan since mid-2010) Table 12. Russia: Imports of Cheese (040620, 040630, 040640, 040690) 2010 2011 Jan-Mar (MT) Partner Country US$ MT US$ MT 2011 2012 World 1,656,111,331 353,286 1,776,162,251 343,590 n/a n/a EU-27 818,599,069 189,962 900,879,304 178,396 47,602 38,932 Belarus 435,784,000 88,845 448,974,300 88,821 n/a n/a Ukraine 368,726,352 66,408 389,987,385 68,395 14,354 10,933 Argentina 11,782,197 3,011 13,621,369 3,377 451 878 New Zealand 8,388,439 2,418 6,703,727 1,730 916 762 Source: Global Trade Atlas (excludes Kazakhstan since mid-2010) Table 13. Russia: Imports of WMP (040221, 040229) 2010 2011 Jan-Mar (MT) Partner Country US$ MT US$ MT 2011 2012 World 153,220,443 39,883 85,741,113 20,190 n/a n/a Belarus 99,603,400 25,147 65,942,000 14,871 n/a n/a EU-27 23,874,293 6,460 10,725,419 2,811 1,982 152 Argentina 9,009,177 2,614 2,768,500 725 725 0 Ukraine 12,676,111 3,285 1,916,101 456 19 88 Moldova 785,444 165 1,440,584 324 55 55 New Zealand 129,611 46 1,174,058 342 160 16 Source: Global Trade Atlas (excludes Kazakhstan since mid-2010) Table 14. Russia: Imports of NFDM (040210) 2010 2011 Jan-Mar (MT) Partner Country US$ MT US$ MT 2011 2012 World 371,051,943 116,346 257,333,708 71,417 n/a n/a Belarus 190,821,200 53,527 171,653,200 44,238 n/a n/a EU-27 146,665,614 50,745 58,514,878 19,024 9,428 3,226 Ukraine 5,347,871 1,498 20,286,154 5,674 2,521 2,314 Australia 1,080,203 360 2,736,610 1,121 594 90 Switzerland 7,818,512 2,630 2,085,071 670 370 25 Source: Global Trade Atlas (excludes Kazakhstan since mid-2010) Table 15. Russia: Imports of Dairy Products (Ex HS-04, 21, 17, 35) 2009 2010 2011 HS Description $mill MT $mill MT $mill MT Dairy Products 2,017 830,352 3,332 1,113,614 3,570 1,087,487 040110 Milk And Cream, Nt Concntrd, Nt Sweetd, Nov 1% Fat 382 1,378 723 861 639 828 040120 Milk/Cream Nt Cnctrd/Swt, Fat Content Ov 1% Nov-6% 5,092 107,549 8,937 168,397 12,609 188,774 040130 Milk & Cream, Not Concntrd/Swtn, Fat Content Ov 6% 16 8,925 47 20,685 39 16,042 040210 Mlk & Crm,Cntd,Swt,Powdr,Gran/Solids,Nov 1.5% Fat 105 51,213 371 116,346 257 71,417 040221 Mlk/Cream Cnctrd Nt Swtn Pwd/Oth Solids Ov 1.5% Fa 16,651 19,538 52,801 39,521 19,475 19,889 040229 Mlk & Crm,Cntd,Swtnd,Powdr/Solids, Over 1.5% Fat 210 1,899 916 362 390 301 040291 Milk And Cream, Concentrated, Not Sweetened, Nesoi 31 26,426 188 44,451 204 52,045 040299 Milk And Cream, Sweetened, Concen Or Not Nesoi 749 29,363 817 34,756 980 34,667 040310 Yogurt, W/N Sweetened, Flavored Or Cntg Fruit/Coco 9,325 6,474 14,680 9,433 26,258 14,891 040390 Buttermilk/Kephir/Curdled Fermntd Acidfd Mlk & Crm 10,153 27,641 16,852 31,965 21,615 37,968 040410 Whey & Modfd Whey Whet/Nt Cncntrtd Cntg Add Sweetn 49 59,834 94 72,103 109 70,444 040490 Products Of Natural Milk Constituents, Nesoi 3,057 958 7,530 2,159 5,648 4,038 040510 Butter 267 100,452 389 107,483 456 106,485 040520 Dairy Spreads 15,681 18,609 74 17,452 96 21,089 040590 Fats And Oils Derived From Milk, N.E.S.O.I. 14 3,949 26 5,400 44 7,712 040610 Cheese (Unrpnd/Uncurd) Frsh Incl Whey Cheese Curd 135 49,025 181 58,084 258 72,515 040620 Cheese Of All Kinds, Grated Or Powdered 4,429 1,694 7,023 1,814 10,690 1,620 040630 Cheese, Processed, Not Grated Or Powdered 42 12,790 58 15,810 72 17,308 040640 Cheese, Blue-Veined, Nesoi 16,257 2,712 21,145 3,450 26,529 4,230 040690 Cheese, Nesoi, Including Cheddar And Colby 1,065 282,149 1,567 332,211 1,666 320,432 170211 Lactose & Lactose Syrup Cont 99% More Lactse By Wt 5,770 9,977 14,619 20,457 13,227 14,038 170219 Lactose In Solid Form And Lactose Syrup, Nesoi 49 84 630 695 1,199 1,064 210500 Ice Cream And Other Edible Ice, With Cocoa Or Not 19,554 5,600 25,980 7,176 29,012 7,697 350110 Casein 258 67 1,840 330 2,052 297 350190 Caseinates & Other Casein Derivatives; Casein Glue 2,466 1,107 3,311 1,227 3,459 1,093 350220 Milk Albumin,Inc Concen Of 2 Or More Whey Proteins 1,841 903 2,240 922 1,077 530 350710 Rennet And Concentrates Thereof 1,488 39 1,593 62 1,596 77 Source: Global Trade Atlas (excludes Kazakhstan since mid-2010) Table 16. Russia: Imports of Dairy Products, 1,000 MT Products 2009 2010 2011 Jan-Apr „11 Jan-Apr „12 YTD %∆ Butter (82%) 040510 102.2 108.9 104.1 28.9 22.3 77.2 --from Belarus 50.4 40.8 40.6 6.4 11.6 181.3 Cheese and cottage cheese 0406 359.4 431.1 433.4 98.4 59.6 97.9 --from Belarus 119.9 127.2 130.4 29.3 27.9 95.2 Concentrated milk and milk powder 0402 133.9 236.5 179.3 47.5 41.6 87.6 --from Belarus 120.7 157.6 148.6 32.5 35.4 108.9 Whole milk 0401 118.5 190.1 204.5 46.9 74.6 159.1 --from Belarus 104.7 162.4 178.5 40.0 67.6 169.0 Source: Ministry of Agriculture
Posted: 27 May 2012

See more from Dairy Products in Russia

Expert Views    
Dairy and Products Semi-annual   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Dairy Production Recovers in 2012   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Dairy and Products Annual 2012   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Milk Production Recovering but High Prices Remain in 2012   By Foreign Agricultural Service
Hot Tips    
Dairy and Products in Russia   By Foreign Agricultural Service