Milk Production Recovering but High Prices Remain in 2012

An Expert's View about Food , Beverages and Tobacco in Russia

Posted on: 13 Nov 2011

Russia?s dairy industry is recovering in the second half of 2011 and milk production is poised for 0.3 percent growth in 2012 while the dairy herd continues to shrink, albeit at a slower pace than historical rates. Milk production and herd sizes are and will be supported by foreseen strong milk prices through 2012. However, as a result, cheese and butter production is expected to slip as more factory use is likely destined for milk powder production.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 10/20/2011 GAIN Report Number: RS1146 Russian Federation Dairy and Products Annual Milk Production Recovering but High Prices Remain in 2012 Approved By: Morgan Haas Prepared By: Morgan Haas, Mikhail Maksimenko Report Highlights: Russia?s dairy industry is recovering in the second half of 2011 and milk production is poised for 0.3 percent growth in 2012 while the dairy herd continues to shrink, albeit at a slower pace than historical rates. Milk production and herd sizes are and will be supported by foreseen strong milk prices through 2012. However, as a result, cheese and butter production is expected to slip as more factory use is likely destined for milk powder production. In turn, cheese and butter imports are forecast higher while milk powder imports are likely to be lower than 2011 levels. Summary Russia?s dairy industry is recovering in the second half of 2011 and milk production is poised for 0.3 percent growth in 2012 while the dairy herd continues to shrink, albeit at a slower pace than historical rates. Milk production and herd sizes are and will be supported by foreseen strong milk prices through 2012. However, as a result, cheese and butter production is expected to slip as more factory use is likely destined for milk powder production. In turn, cheese and butter imports are forecast higher while milk powder imports are likely to be lower than 2011 levels. Fluid Milk Cows in milk inventories will decrease 0.2% in 2012 and fluid milk production should increase by 0.3%. Poor feed supplies reduced cow inventories and milk production in the last half of 2010 and the beginning of 2011. According to the Russian Statistic Agency (Rosstat), Russia increased milk production in January-August 2011 by 1.8% over the same period in 2010. Imports through July 2011 were 9.7% higher (Russian Union of Milk Producers). Milk production began to rebound strongly in August and growth should be maintained throughout the second half of 2011 and into 2012. Table 1. Russia: Inventories, Fluid Milk Supply and Distribution, 1,000MT 2010 2011 2012 Dairy, Milk, Fluid Russia Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begin: Jan 2011 Market Year Begin: Jan 2012 USDA Official New Post USDA Official USDA Official New Post USDA Official Cows In Milk 9,000 8,450 8,820 8,405 8,390 Cows Milk Production 31,900 31,900 31,200 31,800 31,900 Other Milk Production 0 0 0 0 0 Total Production 31,900 31,900 31,200 31,800 31,900 Other Imports 190 190 210 210 220 Total Imports 190 190 210 210 220 Total Supply 32,090 32,090 31,410 32,010 32,120 Other Exports 10 10 5 5 5 Total Exports 10 10 5 5 5 Fluid Use Dom. Consum. 11,800 11,800 11,700 11,800 11,850 Factory Use Consum. 17,830 17,830 17,255 17,755 17,815 Feed Use Dom. Consum. 2,450 2,450 2,450 2,450 2,450 Total Dom. Consumption 32,080 32,080 31,405 32,005 32,115 Total Distribution 32,090 32,090 31,410 32,010 32,120 Dairy Products Cheese production is forecast to decrease 1.2% in 2012, responding to decreased demand for domestic varieties and their prices. Imports are expected to grow 4.8 percent as they are competitively priced and are the dairy product perceived to be the most threatening to the Russian dairy industry. Estimates in 2011 reflect production through August 2011 and trade through July 2011. Belarus cheese trade is currently excluded as most is cottage cheese. Table 2. Russia: Cheese Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT Da 2010 2011 2012 iry, Cheese Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begin: Jan 2011 Market Year Begin: Jan 2012 Russia USDA Official New Post USDA Official USDA Official New Post USDA Official Beginning Stocks 11 11 11 11 12 Production 435 435 440 425 420 Other Imports 305 305 335 315 330 Total Imports 305 305 335 315 330 Total Supply 751 751 786 751 762 Other Exports 20 20 7 7 7 Total Exports 20 20 7 7 7 Human Dom. Consumption 720 720 767 732 743 Other Use, Losses 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dom. Consumption 720 720 767 732 743 Total Use 740 740 774 739 750 Ending Stocks 11 11 12 12 12 Total Distribution 751 751 786 751 762 Lower butter production will be backfilled with imports to stabilize demand. Estimates in 2011 reflect production through August 2011 and trade (including Belarus) through July 2011. Table 3. Russia: Butter Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT (butter-equivalent) 2010 2011 2012 Dairy, Butter Russia Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begin: Jan 2011 Market Year Begin: Jan 2012 USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post USDA Official New Post Beginning Stocks 12 12 7 7 7 Production 205 205 195 212 210 Other Imports 109 109 130 130 135 Total Imports 109 109 130 130 135 Total Supply 326 326 332 349 352 Other Exports 2 2 2 2 2 Total Exports 2 2 2 2 2 Domestic Consumption 317 317 323 340 343 Total Use 319 319 325 342 345 Ending Stocks 7 7 7 7 7 Total Distribution 326 326 332 349 352 Whole milk powder (WMP) and non-fat dry milk (NFDM) production are forecast to increase 4.6% and 5.9%, respectively, in 2012 as the food processing industry continues to grow and increase their utilization. They, along with cream, are the most likely products to increase production as a result of increased factory use fluid milk consumption. Estimates in 2011 reflect production through August 2011 and trade (including Belarus) through July 2011. Table 4. Russia: Whole Milk Powder Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT Da 2010 2011 2012 iry, Dry Whole Milk Powder, Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begin: Jan 2011 Market Year Begin: Jan 2012 Russia USDA Official New Post USDA Official USDA Official New Post USDA Official Production 55 55 60 65 68 Other Imports 55 55 50 50 45 Total Imports 55 55 50 50 45 Total Supply 110 110 110 115 113 Other Exports 2 2 2 2 2 Total Exports 2 2 2 2 2 Human Dom. Consumption 108 108 108 113 111 Total Dom. Consumption 108 108 108 113 111 Total Use 110 110 110 115 113 Total Distribution 110 110 110 115 113 Table 5. Russia: Non-Fat Dry Milk Supply and Distribution, 1,000 MT Da 2010 2011 2012 iry, Milk, Nonfat Dry Market Year Begin: Jan 2010 Market Year Begin: Jan 2011 Market Year Begin: Jan 2012 Russia USDA Official New Post USDA Official USDA Official New Post USDA Official Production 70 70 70 85 90 Other Imports 180 180 185 185 180 Total Imports 180 180 185 185 180 Total Supply 250 250 255 270 270 Human Dom. Consumption 250 250 255 270 270 Total Dom. Consumption 250 250 255 270 270 Total Use 250 250 255 270 270 Total Distribution 250 250 255 270 270 Production FAS Moscow forecast cow inventories to decrease 0.2% in 2012 with fluid milk production increasing 0.3% on higher yields. Trending higher milk yields continue as a relatively smaller share of cows are located at private households. Agricultural enterprises specifically have relatively better and improving genetics, better management, and will have more available feed supplies than experienced mid-2010 to mid-2011. These entities were the hardest hit by feed shortages. Growth in the share of cow numbers are also being witnessed at private farms. Continued development of agricultural enterprises (as opposed to support for private households) is heavily supported by the Ministry of Agriculture. Support for private farms is also available but its impact to production is minimal. Cow Inventory FAS Moscow adjusted ?cows in milk? numbers to reflect a definitional change on milking cows. Previously available data did not differentiate between dairy cows and milking dairy cows. According to Rosstat, cow inventories decreased 0.6 percent, compared to the same period of 2010. The Ministry of Agriculture reported inventories of pedigree cattle in the dairy herd accounted for 12 percent in 2010 and are forecast to reach 13 percent in 2011. Milk Production Russia produced 22.2 MMT of fluid milk in January-August 2011, which is 1.8 percent less compared to 2010. Production started to rebound in August and will remain strong throughout the year to improve on this comparison, especially considering milk production suffered in the last half of 2010 as a result of short feed supplies that persisted through the first half of 2011. The most recent Russian Government forecast for 2012 is 31.1 MMT, according to the Ministry of Economic Development (MED). However, such an estimate would require a significant reduction in cows and/or milk yield. The Ministry of Agriculture forecast, according to the Target Program for Dairy Development 2009-2012, is 37.0 MMT. MED?s economic forecast through 2014 foresees milk production lower through 2013 and rebounding in 2014 (yet still ending lower than 2010 levels). According to the Ministry of Agriculture?s new draft Federal Program for the Development of Agriculture until 2020, milk production should increase to 32.6 MMT by 2014. Dairy Products Production According to dairy industry experts, production of dairy products, including cheese and butter, will struggle in 2012 as processors battle high prices for raw milk. In exchange, industry sources indicate they will shift to produce more cream and milk powders. Resulting from current high milk prices, during January-August 2011, production of cheese and whole milk products (milk, kefir, sour cream and other) decreased by 3.5% and 3.4%. Consumption Consumption growth of dairy products remains largely constricted by high prices as well as import controls, which limit supply even while production is flat or declining. According to an examination of dairy products in the retail market by the Russian Union of Milk Producers (Soyuzmoloko), many continue to include vegetable fats of tropical origin without indicating such contents on the product?s label, in violation of Russia?s dairy Technical Regulation. Inspections deemed more than 30 percent of butter samples, 50 percent of sweetened condensed milk, over 50 percent of sour cream, and 20 percent of cheese spread as ?fake? products. According to Soyuzmoloko, such products ?bring harm to dairy producers and consumers' health.? While Soyuzmoloko underscored their point as unfair price competition, some retail chain representatives noted it was more important to ensure the product availability for the poorest citizens who cannot afford to buy expensive dairy products. Milk Prices Prices have remained steadily high for farm-gate, processor, and retail milk prices throughout 2011. To some extent, the situation of escalating prices was softened by an agreement among producers and processers that agreed mutually acceptable minimum and maximum price levels for raw milk. Lack of quality fluid milk will continue to make domestic dairy products less affordable for Russian customers. Chart 1. Russia: Farm-gate, Processor, and Retail Prices for Fluid Milk, 3.2% Fat, RUR/kg Source: Ministry of Agriculture www.mcx.ru Trade Imports of dairy products, especially cheese and butter, should remain steady with upside growth in 2012 until Russia again enhances border protection. Border protection has and will continue to be strengthened with the influence of Belarus in Russian dairy policy. Belarusian fluid milk and dairy products will continue to take a larger share of Russian market as they maximize bilateral preferences and an absent border control. Policy Development of Dairy Cattle Husbandry, 2009-2012 In line with the Program ?Development of Dairy Cattle Husbandry in 2009-2012,? the Ministry planned to allocate resources for 30 regional programs, valued at RUR1.55 billion ($48 million) in 2011. As published in July, the criteria for selecting regional programs to develop dairy are as follows: (1) two percent growth in milk production and (2) preservation of dairy cow numbers compared to the previous year. The GOR additionally allocated RUR5.0 billion ($166 million) to regions that suffered from heavy drought to preserve breeding cattle numbers. Development of Family Dairy Farming, 2009-2011 The Ministry of Agriculture allocated RUR1.55 billion ($48.4 million) for a ?Family Dairy Farming Project? for 2012 as an extension of the state program "Development of the Pilot Family Dairy Cattle Farms for 2009-2011." The program will co-finance 30 percent of all construction costs and intends to launch 150 family dairy farms. Since its launch in 2009, the Ministry reports 300 dairy farms have been created. Interest incurred on loans from the Russian Agricultural Bank (Rosselkhozbank) will be fully subsidized by the State. Rosselkhozbank will also provide the beginning farmer with the calculation of profitability and documents needed to start the project. Since 2009, the Rosselkhozbank has granted loans for RUR738 million ($25 million) for the creation of family dairy farms. The credit can be issued for a period of 2 years (to form the initial working capital) and 15 years for construction, renovation and modernization of a family farm. The Draft Program ?Development of Agriculture in 2012-2020? The draft program ?Development of Agriculture in 2012-2020? contains measures for the direct support of dairy cattle breeding, envisaged in the draft Order of the Ministry of Agriculture ?On approval of rules for distribution and transferring subsidies from the federal budget for economically important regional agricultural programs? of July 28 2011 # 628. Subsidies from the federal budget will be transferred to the regions on the condition regional budgets cofinance 30 percent of the sum transferred by the federal budget. The Order applies two production-linked subsidies: RUR3.0 ($0.10) per liter of highest and the first grade milk for farms which do not reduce cow inventories and milk production; RUR3,000 ($100) of expenses per dairy cow in private households; The program contains the following milk production and processing goals: stabilizing cow inventories at 8.9 million head, rational distribution of dairy herd through the territory of the Russia; improvement of farming and feeding technologies. to increase production of whole milk products to 13.5 MMT, of cheese and cheese products to 546,000 MT, and butter to 280,000 MT; to increase assortment, quality and competitiveness of dairy products to reach 85.3 percent self-sufficiency in dairy products by 2020. The program envisages the following regulations in order to increase competitiveness of Russian dairy products: Import duties should compensate for foreign country government support for the production of milk and dairy products. Introduction of a traceability system for livestock products to promote Russian dairy products to foreign markets. Support for the certification of livestock and processing enterprises to increase exports to third countries outside the Customs Union. Application of government procurement and trade interventions in respect to dairy products (milk powder) as a mechanism of price regulation for the milk market. The list of products for government intervention to vary with changes in the production and consumption of milk and dairy products. Creation of a special financial fund to purchase products for the government intervention. Formation of logistics procurement for processing, storage, and sale of products for government intervention. Dates and amounts of government intervention to be determined based on the need for seasonal adjustment of prices in the domestic market. MILK AND DAIRY PRODUCTION TABLES Table 6. Russia: Dairy Cow and Heifer Inventories, Million Head 2009 2010 10/09 All types of farms Cows, (excluding at fattening) 9,025.8 8,844.3 98.0 Heifers 1,289.5 1,327.7 103.0 Agricultural organizations Cows, (excluding at fattening) 3,767.6 3,713.6 98.6 Heifers 672.8 643.2 95.6 Private households Cows, (excluding at fattening) 4,962.5 4,411.8 95.4 Heifers 538.6 598.3 111.1 Private farms and entrepreneurs Cows, (excluding at fattening) 633.6 718.9 113.5 Heifers 78.1 86.2 110.5 Source: Rosstat Table 7. Russia: Milk Production, Agricultural Establishments End of August 2010 2011 11/10 Cow inventory, million head 3,675.7 3,674.4 100 Milk Production MMT 1,0037.4 9,897.9 98.6 Per cow milking productivity, kilogram 3,203 3,240 101.2 Milking cow inventories, million head* 3,134 3,055 97.4 Source: Rosstat *Calculated by FAS Moscow Table 8. Russia: Per Cow Annual Milk Productivity, Kilogram 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Farm 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, s of 7 5 3 3 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 0 1 3 5 5 7 7 all 3 6 3 2 6 5 4 3 8 3 0 5 9 4 3 7 5 0 9 3 7 types 1 7 2 8 2 3 4 9 1 2 2 1 7 9 7 6 6 1 5 7 6 Agric ultura l 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, establ 7 5 2 2 0 0 9 0 2 2 3 5 8 9 0 2 5 7 8 0 1 ishme 8 7 4 4 3 1 6 7 4 8 4 5 0 7 6 8 6 5 9 8 8 nts 3 4 3 6 3 6 5 4 2 2 1 1 2 6 5 0 4 8 2 9 9 4, 6, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, Privat 4 0 7 4 0 9 9 0 1 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 2 2 e 4 7 9 5 0 8 9 7 3 8 5 2 0 3 6 0 4 1 4 6 9 farms 8 2 9 3 1 9 3 7 5 6 3 8 1 8 5 7 2 4 6 8 1 Privat 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, e 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 4 5 6 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 5 house 7 4 4 9 0 8 1 6 5 1 8 6 1 4 4 3 4 7 5 1 1 holds 6 3 5 7 7 8 2 2 8 5 7 7 2 8 3 0 9 8 6 3 0 Source: Rosstat http://www.gks.ru/dbscripts/Cbsd/DBInet.cgi Table 9. Russia: Production of Dairy Products, 1,000MT 2009 2010 10/09 Percent Jan-Aug 2010 Jan-Aug 2011 Jan-Aug 11/10 Processed milk, fluid 4,369 4,868 111,4 3,272 3,214 98,2 Kefir 902 1,009 111,9 732.0 707.9 96.7 Milk and cream in dry form 114 110 96,2 79.6 99.4 124.8 Butter and spread 217 207 95,3 145.4 149.5 102.8 Cheese and cottage cheese 988 1042 105,5 751.5 738.7 98.3 Ice cream and frozen deserts 326 387 118,6 317.2 279.1 88.0 Concentrated dairy products 650 590 97,4 513.4 522.2 101.7 Source: Rosstat MILK AND DAIRY TRADE TABLES Table 10. Russia: Imports of Dairy Products, 1,000 MT Products 2008 2009 2010 Jan-Aug ?10 Jan-Aug ?11 YTD %? Butter 040510 120.8 102.2 108.9 60,6 68,6 113,2 --from Belarus 45.6 50.4 40.8 28,0 29,1 103,9 Cheese and curd 0406 363.9 359.4 431.1 236,7 240,4 101,6 --from Belarus 101.7 119.9 127.2 71,5 78,6 109,9 Milk powder 0402 160.2 133.9 236.5 128,6 109,6 85,2 --from Belarus 141.4 120.7 157.6 96,5 85,9 89,0 Whole milk 0401 78.7 118.5 190.1 101,9 111,8 109,7 --from Belarus 65.1 104.7 162.4 90,7 97,6 107,6 Source: Russian Union of Milk Producers Table 11. Russia: Import Quota for Belarus, 2011 NFDM Whole Milk Concentrated Dry Dairy Cheese and Other dairy Powder milk whey Butter cottage cheese products QI 16.0 5.0 12.5 2.0 17.5 31.0 75.0 QII 16.0 5.0 12.5 2.0 17.5 31.0 75.0 QIII 17.0 5.0 12.5 2.0 17.5 32.0 75.0 QIV 16.0 5.0 12.5 2.0 17.5 31.0 75.0 Total 65.0 20.0 50.0 8.0 70.0 125.0 300.0 Source: The Russian Union of Milk producers http://www.souzmoloko.ru/news/news_659.html Table 12. Russia: Imports of Dairy Products, MT Annual Year To Date Description % 2008 2009 2010 08/201 08/2011 Change Dairy Products Ex 04, 21, 35 454,151 383,807 549,501 331,529 328,252 -0.99 Milk And Cream, Nt Concntrd, Nt Sweetd, Nov 040110 1% Fat 553 483 661 365 472 29.29 Milk/Cream Nt Cnctrd/Swt, Fat Content Ov 1% 040120 Nov-6% 5,493 6,154 11,076 5,239 8,855 69.01 Milk & Cream, Not Concntrd/Swtn, Fat Content 040130 Ov 6% 7,543 6,496 15,833 8,051 8,144 1.15 Mlk & Crm,Cntd,Swt,Powdr,Gran/Solids,Nov 040210 1.5% Fat 11,535 7,973 62,819 33,467 22,192 -33.69 Mlk/Cream Cnctrd Nt Swtn Pwd/Oth Solids Ov 040221 1.5% Fa 7,145 4,537 14,522 7,181 4,636 -35.44 Mlk & Crm,Cntd,Swtnd,Powdr/Solids, Over 040229 1.5% Fat 7 45 214 89 64 -27.68 Milk And Cream, Concentrated, Not 040291 Sweetened, Nesoi 31 1 90 0 11 n/a Milk And Cream, Sweetened, Concen Or Not 040299 Nesoi 100 201 219 164 161 -1.94 Yogurt, W/N Sweetened, Flavored Or Cntg 040310 Fruit/Coco 5,685 5,666 8,620 4,894 9,537 94.88 Buttermilk/Kephir/Curdled Fermntd Acidfd Mlk 040390 & Crm 13,108 5,676 7,754 4,619 7,158 54.97 Whey & Modfd Whey Whet/Nt Cncntrtd Cntg 040410 Add Sweetn 59,024 51,118 46,358 30,410 19,597 -35.56 040490 Products Of Natural Milk Constituents, Nesoi 1,435 868 1,892 1,110 997 -10.14 040510 Butter 75,191 50,103 66,728 36,023 44,198 22.69 040520 Dairy Spreads 4,433 5,244 4,940 3,320 4,513 35.95 040590 Fats And Oils Derived From Milk, N.E.S.O.I. 4,869 3,929 5,360 3,292 5,119 55.49 Cheese (Unrpnd/Uncurd) Frsh Incl Whey 040610 Cheese Curd 29,669 23,237 29,840 18,655 25,784 38.21 040620 Cheese Of All Kinds, Grated Or Powdered 517 864 1,286 686 870 26.87 040630 Cheese, Processed, Not Grated Or Powdered 15,434 12,702 15,498 10,343 10,478 1.31 040640 Cheese, Blue-Veined, Nesoi 2,772 2,712 3,450 1,877 2,340 24.67 040690 Cheese, Nesoi, Including Cheddar And Colby 199,887 189,034 244,206 155,820 146,500 -5.98 Ice Cream And Other Edible Ice, With Cocoa 210500 Or Not 7,910 5,111 6,282 4,707 5,624 19.47 350110 Casein 19 59 215 85 100 17.15 Caseinates & Other Casein Derivatives; Casein 350190 Glue 1,227 1,096 1,199 797 783 -1.75 Milk Albumin,Inc Concen Of 2 Or More Whey 350220 Proteins 523 461 376 290 71 -75.35 350710 Rennet And Concentrates Thereof 41 39 62 45 47 4.3 Source: GTIS Note: Excluding Kazakhstan (since July 2010) and Belarus (entire time series) Table 13. Russia: Imports of Butter and AMF (040510, 040590) by Country Quantity (MT) Partner Country % Change 2008 2009 2010 Jan-Jul ?10 Jan-Jul ?11 2011/2010 World 80,060 54,033 72,088 34,666 46,955 35.45 EU-27 22,991 20,982 32,846 15,535 17,351 11.69 New Zealand 22,953 26,371 27,111 14,920 22,223 48.95 Argentina 10,855 3,150 3,044 573 1,512 163.89 Uruguay 2,125 879 2,033 377 1,211 221.27 United States 16,690 224 3,069 2,422 0 - 100.00 Source: GTIS Note: Excluding Kazakhstan (since July 2010) and Belarus (entire time series) Table 14. Russia: Imports of Cheese (040620, 040630, 040640, 040690) by Country Quantity (MT) Partner Country % Change 2008 2009 2010 Jan-Jul ?10 Jan-Jul ?11 2011/2010 World 218,609 205,312 264,441 146,800 138,975 - 5.33 EU-27 138,866 136,350 189,962 103,363 96,024 - 7.10 Ukraine 62,470 61,567 66,408 39,483 38,280 - 3.05 Argentina 7,843 1,877 3,011 1,103 1,713 55.30 New Zealand 3,597 2,986 2,418 1,394 1,426 2.25 Source: GTIS Note: Excluding Kazakhstan (since July 2010) and Belarus (entire time series) Table 15. Russian: Imports of WMP (040221, 040229) by Country Quantity (MT) P % Change artner Country 2009 2010 Jan-Jul ?10 Jan-Jul ?11 2011/2010 World 4,582 14,736 6,755 4,469 - 33.84 EU-27 3,944 6,460 3,328 2,184 - 34.38 Argentina 200 2,614 402 725 80.35 Ukraine 439 3,285 2,610 418 - 83.98 Australia 0 201 0 356 0.00 Source: GTIS Note: Excluding Kazakhstan (since July 2010) and Belarus (entire time series) Table 16. Russia: Imports of NFDM (040210) by Country Quantity (MT) Partner Country % Change 2008 2009 2010 Jan-Jul ?10 Jan-Jul ?11 2011/2010 World 11,535 7,973 62,819 25,754 21,162 - 17.83 EU-27 5,691 7,198 50,745 21,751 14,291 - 34.30 Ukraine 4,299 0 1,498 1,062 4,434 317.60 Source: GTIS Note: Excluding Kazakhstan (since July 2010) and Belarus (entire time series)
Posted: 13 November 2011

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