Food and Agricultural Import Regulations and Standards

An Expert's View about Food , Beverages and Tobacco in Singapore

Posted on: 21 Dec 2012

Singapore is almost completely dependent on imports for its food security. While import regulations can be stringent, they are generally predictable, transparent, and science-based.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 12/5/2012 GAIN Report Number: Singapore Food and Agricultural Import Regulations and Standards - Narrative FAIRS Country Report Approved By: Chris P. Rittgers Prepared By: Alice Kwek Report Highlights: Singapore is almost completely dependent on imports for its food security. While import regulations can be stringent, they are generally predictable, transparent, and science-based. Readers of this report should consult the relevant sections of the Food Regulations for information on their own specific food product or products and contact Singapore’s Office of Agriculture Affairs if further clarification is needed. Table of Contents SECTION I. FOOD LAWS ................................................................................................................ 3 SECTION II. LABELING REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................. 5 SECTION III. PACKAGING AND CONTAINER REGULATIONS ........................................ 12 SECTION IV. FOOD ADDITIVES REGULATIONS ................................................................ 13 SECTION V. PESTICIDES AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS................................................. 15 SECTION VI. OTHER REGULATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS........................................... 16 SECTION VII. OTHER SPECIFIC STANDARDS ..................................................................... 33 SECTION VIII. COPYRIGHT AND/OR TRADEMARK LAWS .............................................. 39 APPENDIX I. GOVERRMENT REGULATORY AGENCY CONTACTS ............................... 43 APPENDIX II. OTHER IMPORT SPECIALIST CONTACTS .................................................. 46 GAIN REPORT Page 2 SECTION I. FOOD LAWS: In Singapore, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) is the national authority responsible for food safety for both primary and processed food. AVA ensures the safety of all food from production to retail. AVA adopts a science-based risk analysis and management approach based on international standards to evaluate and ensure food safety. The AVA is responsible for enforcing the Sale Food Act (Chapter 283). It is an Act for securing wholesomeness and purity of food and fixing standards for foods; for preventing the sale or other disposition, or use of articles dangerous or injurious to health; and to provide for the regulation of food establishments. The Subsidiary Legislation of the Sale of Food Act (Chapter 283) include; Food Regulations Sale of Food (Composition of Offences) Regulations Sale of Food (Fees) Regulations Sale of Food (Food Establishments) Regulations Sale of Food (Prohibition of Chewing Gum) Regulations 2003 The Food Regulations is the most important for exporters as it provide the details of Singapore guidelines governing all imported foods. All food, drinks and edible agricultural products, including food ingredients, whether locally manufactured or imported to Singapore are required to comply with the prevailing requirements laid down in the Food Regulations. The Food Regulations lay down specific provisions on the following: General requirements for labeling Exemptions from general requirements for labeling Containers to be labeled Hampers to be labeled Nutrition information panel False or Misleading statements, etc. Date-marking ○ Removal, etc., of date-marking prohibited Claims as to presence of vitamins and minerals Misleading statements in advertisements Food and appliances offered as prizes Imported food to be registered. Food Additives Incidental Constituents in Food Mineral Hydrocarbons Containers for Food Irradiated Food GAIN REPORT Page 3 Part IV of the Singapore Food Regulations provides Standards and Particular Labeling Requirements for the following product categories: Flour, Bakery and Cereal Products Aerating Ingredients Meat and Meat Products Fish and Fish Products Edible Fats and Oils Milk and Milk Products Ice-Cream, Frozen Confections and Related Products Sauces, Vinegar and Relishes Sugar and Sugar Products Tea, Coffee and Cocoa Fruit Juices and Fruit Cordials Jams Non-Alcoholic Drinks Alcoholic Drinks Salts Spices and Condiments Flavoring Essences or Extracts Flavor Enhancers Special Purpose Foods ○ Products that are consumed by persons with a special diet. The category includes Products such as low-calorie food, infant foods such as infant formula, infant milk formula or milk preparation and diabetic foods. Miscellaneous Foods ○ Products such as agar-agar, custard powder, edible gelatin, fish and prawn crackers. Rice We advise the reader to consult the relevant sections of the Food Regulations for information on their own specific food product or products. The AVA regularly reviews and updates the Food Regulations, and it is strongly recommended that interested parties contact the Singapore Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority for further clarification (please see contact address listed at the back pages of this report). A soft copy of the Food Regulations and Amendments are available on AVA’s website at: www.ava.gov.sg The Food Control Division of the AVA:  Regulates the safety of locally produced and imported fresh produce and processed foods.  Enforces food safety programs for both locally produced and imported fresh produce and processed foods.  Operates a comprehensive inspection program, monitors emerging health threats and develops food policies affecting fresh produce and processed foods. GAIN REPORT Page 4 The AVA inspects all imported primary produce, livestock and processed food at ports of entry. The AVA in particular: 1. Inspects every consignment of meat and poultry imports for wholesomeness and freedom from disease, spoilage and economic fraud, apart from documentary checks. Samples are taken for microbiological examination to detect presence of food-borne pathogens and food borne parasites. Tests are also conducted for food physical quality. Please refer to AVA’s website, www.ava.gov.sg for more details on laboratory testing. Importers are requested to withhold the sale of imported meat and poultry products until the Singapore authorities clear them through physical examination and laboratory testing. This process is strictly carried out without exception. Shipments that fail to meet the Singapore food safety standards are totally rejected and destroyed under AVA’s supervision. For these reasons, it is advised that U.S. exporters consult a knowledgeable Singaporean importer on the strict regulations imposed on imported meats before proceeding to export their products to Singapore. 2. Strictly monitors imported seafood for various chemical preservatives, particularly high-risk products such as oysters, clams, mussels, scallops and cooked crabmeat. These products are automatically detained upon arrival for physical inspection and laboratory testing. High-risk shellfish products may only be imported from sources with acceptable sanitation programs. A health certificate must accompany each shellfish import from the country of origin. It is strongly advised that U.S. exporters check with a competent Singapore importer or the AVA on the requirements of the Singapore Food Regulations concerning fish and seafood before proceeding to export their products. 3. Inspects all imported fruits and vegetables. Samples are taken for laboratory testing for pesticide residues. All external cartons of imported fruits and vegetables are required either to be tagged or labeled to indicate their country of origin and packing plant, thus allowing the AVA to identify the farms, which use excessive pesticides. Consignments which exceed the prescribed maximum residue levels (MRLs) listed in the Singapore Food Act, Food Regulations are rejected and destroyed under AVA’s supervision. It is not unusual for whole consignments of imported fruits or vegetables to be destroyed due to non-compliance with Singapore’s Food Regulations. The allowable ingredients, preservative, additive, and coloring are listed in the Food Act, Food Regulations. It is always advisable for U.S. exporters or the Singapore importers to seek prior permission if any of ingredients falls outside the scope of the current food regulations. SECTION II. LABELING REQUIREMENTS: GAIN REPORT Page 5 A. General Requirements. The Singapore’s Food Regulations require that all pre-packed food products for sale, including drinks to be properly labeled. The law requires that the following basic information be declared and be provided in English: Name or description of the product. The common name of the food or drink or a description which is sufficient to indicate the true nature of the product. It is advisable to check Part IV – Standards and Particular Labeling Requirement for Food of the Food Regulations to ensure that the terms used for the common name or the descriptions comply with the requirement. Statement of Ingredients. A complete list of ingredients and additives should be declared in descending order of the proportions by weight in which they are present on each product label, i.e. the ingredient that weighed the most should be listed at the top. The exact identity or the permitted generic terms of the ingredients and additives should be declared. International Numbering System (INS) number or E number can be used for declaration of food additives. (Under regulation 5 (4)(b) of the Food Regulations, the name and description of ingredients should indicate their true nature. Please refer to the First Schedule of the Food Regulations for a listing of allowed ingredients belonging to food groups.) Declaration of Foods and ingredients known to cause hypersensitivity. Regulation 5(4)(ea) of the Food Regulations states that foods and ingredients known to cause hypersensitivity are required to be declared when present as an ingredient/additive or as a component of a compound ingredient. The following foods and ingredients to be declared are: (i) Cereals containing gluten. This group includes wheat, rye, barley, oats, spelt or their hybridized strains and their products. (ii) Crustacean and crustacean products. This group includes crayfish, prawns, shrimps, lobsters, crabs and their products. (iii) Eggs and egg products. This group includes eggs from laying hens as well as eggs from duck, turkey, quail, goose, gull, guinea fowl and their products. (iv) Fish and fish products. This group also includes molluscs such as oysters, clams, scallops and their products. (v) Peanuts, soybeans and their products. Peanuts may be declared using similar terms such as “groundnuts”. Terms such as “soya” or “soy” can be used for soybeans. (vi) Milk and milk products (including lactose). This group includes milk from cows, buffaloes, or goats and their products. GAIN REPORT Page 6 (vii) Tree nuts and nut products. This group includes almond, hazelnut, walnut, cashew nut, pecan nut, Brazil nut, pistachio nut, macadamia nut and their products. (viii) Sulphites in concentrates of 10mg/kg or more. Food products that have sulphur dioxide and/or sulphites directly added and/or carried over from food ingredients at a total concentration of 10mg/kg or more (calculated in terms of total sulphur dioxide). Net Content. The net quantity, derived using the Minimum Quantity System or the Average Quantity System, of the food in the package should be printed on the label, expressed in terms of volumetric measures for liquid foods (for example, milliliters, liters) or net weight for solid foods (for example, grams or kilograms) or any other measure. In the case of weight measure, suitable words such as “Net” should be used to describe the manner of measurement. Food packed in a liquid medium, i.e. water, aqueous solutions of sugar and salt, fruit and vegetables juices in canned fruits and vegetables only, or vinegar, either singly or in combination, will be required to have both “net weight” and “drained weight” declared. Wording size for label. In general the wordings providing consumers with information on product information should be printed in letters of not less than 1.5 millimeters in height. Name and address of manufacturer, importer or package or distributor. The name and address of the manufacturer, packer or vendor should be printed on the label of foods of local origin. In the case of imported food, the label should indicate the name and address of the local importer, distributor or agent. Telegraphic, facsimile and post office addresses alone are not acceptable. Country of Origin of the product. The labels of imported foods must contain the name of the country of origin. The name of a city, town or province alone is not acceptable as an indication of country of origin. The following words or any words indicating the presence of aspartame in any food: “PHENYLKETONURICS: CONTAINS “PHENYLALANINE Exemptions from Labeling Requirements: The labeling requirements do not apply to food weighed, counted or measured in the presence of the purchaser and food which is loosely packed in the retailer’s premises. The labeling requirements do not apply to sugar confectionery, chocolate and chocolate confectionery except for the requirement covering food, which contains synthetic coloring and the name and address of manufacturer, importer, packer or distributor. Intoxicating liquors are not required to carry a statement of ingredients on the labels. Additional Points to Note: Pre-packed foods intended for human consumption and offered as a price, reward or sample GAIN REPORT Page 7 for the purpose of advertising are required to comply with the labeling required stated under “General Labeling Requirements”. Recipes or suggestions or pictorial illustrations on how to serve pre-packed foods may be included on food labels only if they are closely accompanied by the words “Recipe” or “Serving Suggestion”, be printed in letters of not less than 1.5 millimeters in height. Pet foods should not carry any word to indicate or imply that the food is also fit or suitable for human consumption. Containers to be labeled. Where food is sold in containers other than in a package, the seller must attach to the containers in which the food is stored, a label or statement visible to purchaser, the name or description of the product, list of ingredients, net weight or volume and the name and address of manufacturer, importer, packer or distributor. Nutrition Labeling. Nutrition Labeling is required when nutrition claims, vitamins and minerals claims or permitted health claims are made. Please see the following sections, (1) on regulations on declarations that are made on the labels of products and (2) where claims are made on nutritional content and vitamins and minerals. U.S. exporters should note that the Food Control Division of the AVA strictly enforces the labeling laws. It is a requirement to comply with Singapore’s Food Regulations before products are imported into Singapore. B. Specific Requirements on Nutritional Labeling Nutrition claims as defined in the Singapore Food Regulations, is a representation that suggests or implies that a food has a nutritive property, and includes reference to: (a) Energy; (b) Salt, sodium or potassium; (c) Amino acids, carbohydrates, cholesterol, fats, fatty acids, fiber, protein, starch or sugars; or (d) Any other nutrient; but does not include a statement of ingredients or a declaration or claim relating to a vitamin or mineral. Examples of nutrition claims are “Low in calories: “Sugar free: and “Reduced sodium”. Nutrition claims are allowed as long as the requirements of the Singapore Food Regulations and the nutrient claims guidelines published in “A Handbook on Nutrition Labeling” by Singapore’s Health Promotion Board (HPB) are complied with. A copy of the handbook can be downloaded from the following website: http://www.ava.gov.sg/FoodSector/FoodLabelingAdvertisement/ The Food Regulations require nutrient declaration in an acceptable nutrition information panel, for pre-packed foods when nutrition claims are made. The following is an example of an acceptable nutrition information panel: Nutrition Information Servings per package (here insert number of servings)* Serving size: (here insert the serving size)* Per Serving* Per 100g (or 100 or ml) GAIN REPORT Page 8 Energy kcal, kJ or kcal, kJ or both both Protein g g Fat g g Carbohydrate g g (here insert the nutrients for which nutrition claims are made, or any other nutrients to be declared)** *Applicable only if the nutrients are declared on a per serving basis. **Amounts of sodium, potassium and cholesterol are to be declared in mg. Source: Food Regulations – Twelfth Schedule Where any label includes a nutrition claim with respect to salt, sodium or potassium or any two or all of them, but does not include any other nutrition claim, reference to energy or nutrients other than sodium and potassium may be omitted from the panel. Point to note: This regulation does not apply to any pre-packed food which has a total surface area of less than 100 square centimeters and has included in the label the following: (a) a statement of the quantity of each nutrient in respect of which the nutrition claim is made; or (b) where there is a claim that the food is free of sugar or where there is a claim as to the energy value of the food, a statement of the energy yield of the food. Additional requirements for foods claimed to be source of energy or protein. Foods claimed to be a source of energy are required to state on the labels the quantity of that food to be consumed in one day, which should yield at least 300 kcal. The labels should also include an acceptable nutrition information panel. Foods claimed to be a source or an excellent source of protein should include on the label the quantity of that food to be consumed in one day, and an acceptable nutrition information panel. To claim as a source of protein, at least 12% of the total calorie yield of the food should be derived from protein. To claim as an excellent source of protein, at least 20% of the total calorie yield of the food should be derived from protein. In addition, the amount of food stated on the label as the quantity to be consumed in one day should also contain at least 10g of protein. Examples of the daily recommendation statement are “Recommended daily intake: 3 servings”; “Add 20g powder in 200ml water. Drink 2 times daily.” Specific labeling requirements for certain food categories Specific labeling requirements are stipulated for certain food categories under their individual specification standards. The following lists examples of food categories with specific labeling requirements: GAIN REPORT Page 9 Type of Food Singapore Food Regulations Irradiated Food Regulation 38 Wholegrain Regulation 40A Bakery Products Regulation 53 Edible fats and oils Regulation 79 Milk Regulation 109 Coffee (coffee and chicory, coffee mixture, instant or soluble coffee and chicory) Regulation 158, 159, 161 Fruit Juice Regulation 171 Natural mineral water Regulation 183A Fruit wine Regulation 195 Compounded liquor Regulation 210 Infant Formula Regulation 254 Rice Regulation 260 Source: AVA website Warning Statements. Products containing the ingredients listed below would need to be labeled with the relevant warning statements or any other statements to the same effect. For example: Aspartame “Phenylketonurics: contains phenylalanine” [refer to regulation 5 (4)(f)] Royal Jelly “Warning: This product may not be suitable for asthma and allergy sufferers” [refer to regulation 151A] C. Health claims and claims about vitamins and minerals Health claims. The Singapore Food Regulations prohibit the following: use of false misleading statement, word, brand, picture, or mark purporting to indicate the nature, stability, quantity, strength, purity, composition, weight, origin, age, effects, or proportion of the food or any ingredients to be used on food labels and advertisements, unless otherwise specified. claims that a food has therapeutic or prophylactic action; claims which could be interpreted as advice of a medical nature from any person; claims that a food prevent, alleviate or cure any disease or condition affecting the human body; claims that health or an improved physical condition may be achieved by consuming any food. the use of the word “pure” is acceptable only if the food is free from other added substances or is of the composition, strength and quality required under the Singapore Food Regulations. Claims on Vitamins and Minerals There are extensive regulations covering disclosures that are required to be made on the labels of products that claim to contain vitamins and/or minerals or claim to be rich in vitamins and/or minerals. Therefore, U.S. exporters are strongly advised to refer to the Food Regulations to check on their products’ compliance with these regulations. (1 ) Foods that carry claims on the presence of vitamin(s) and/or mineral(s) are required to contain at GAIN REPORT Page 10 least one-sixth of the daily allowance as stated in the following Table I and II for the relevant vitamin or mineral, and are in per reference quantity for that food respectively. (2) Foods that are claimed to be a rich source (including words like “good”, “rich” and “high”) of vitamin(s) and/or mineral(s) are required to contain at least 50% of the daily allowance as stated in Table I and II for the relevant vitamin or mineral and are in per reference quantity for that food respectively. Any vitamin(s) and mineral(s) claims should be declared on the label in one of the following ways: (a) “(quantity) of the food contains (quantity) of name of vitamins/minerals” to substantiate the claim. (b) (i) serving size: (state the quantity of the food per serving here); and (ii) each serving of this food contains the following: Name of Vitamin/Mineral Percent Recommended Daily Allowance (state the names of the (state the corresponding percent vitamins/minerals) recommended daily allowance of the vitamins/minerals). TABLE I VITAMINS AND MINERALS Substances To be calculated as Daily Allowance Vitamin A, vitamin A alcohol and ester, carotenes Micrograms of retinol 750 mcg activity Vitamin B1, aneurine, thiamine, thiamine hydrochloride, Milligrams of thiamine 1 mg thiamine monoitrate Vitamin B2, riboflavin Milligrams of riboflavin 1.5 mg Vitamin B6, pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine Milligrams of 2.0 mg pyridoxamine Vitamin B12, cobalamin, cyanocobalamin Micrograms of 2.0 mcg cyancobalamin Folic acid, folate Micrograms of folic acid 200 mcg Niacine, niacinamide, nicotinic acid, nicotinadmine Millgrams of niacin 16 mg Vitamin C, ascorbic acid Milligrams of ascorbic 30 mg acid Vitamin D, vitamin D2, vitamin D3 Micrograms of 2.5 mcg cholecalciferol Calcium Milligrams of calcium 500 mg Iodine Micrograms of iodine 100 mcg Iron Milligrams of iron 10 mg Phosphorus Milligrams of 800 mg phosphorus GAIN REPORT Page 11 TABLE II Food Reference Quantity Bread 240 g Breakfast Cereals 60 g Extracts of meat or vegetables or yeast (modified or not) 10 g Fruit and vegetable juices 200 ml Fruit juice concentrates (diluted according to directions on the label) 200 ml Fruit juice cordials (diluted according to directions on the label 200 ml Flavored cordials or syrups (diluted according to directions on the label) 200 ml Malted milk powder 30 g Condensed milk 180 g Milk powder (full cream or skimmed) and food containing not less than 51% of milk 60 g powder Other concentrated liquid food including powdered beverage not specified above 200 ml (diluted according to directions on the label) Liquid food not specified above 200 ml Solid food not specified above 120 g (3) The label should not contain any statement claiming or implying that the article of food is a source of one or more vitamins or minerals if it contains less than 50% of the recommended daily allowance as specified in Table I unless the recommended daily intake of the food contains not less than 50% of the recommended daily allowance and unless the recommendation is declared on the label. (4) When vitamin A or vitamin D or a mineral is added to a food, the addition must not increase the vitamin A content to more than 750 mcg of retinol activity per reference quantity for that food as specified in Table II, nor increase the content of vitamin D to more than 10 mcg of cholecalciferol or of any mineral to more than 3 times the daily allowance (as specified in Table I for that mineral) per reference quantity for that food as specified in Table II. SECTION III. PACKAGING AND CONTAINER REGULATIONS: The following are prohibited: (1) Contains more than1 ppm of vinyl chloride monomer; (2) If any package or container yields, or is likely to yield to its contents more than 0.05 ppm vinyl chloride monomer; or (3) If any package or container yields, or is likely to yield to its contents any compounds known to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic or any other poisonous or injurious substances. GAIN REPORT Page 12 The Food Regulations prohibit the sale, consignment or delivery the use of any appliance, container or vessel that is intended for use in the storage, preparation or cooking of food, and is either capable of imparting lead, antimony, arsenic, cadmium or any other toxic substance to any food stored, prepared or cooked in it. Additionally, the regulations forbid the use of ceramic food ware where the maximum amount of lead in any of six units examined is: (a) not more than 3.0 mcg of lead per ml of leaching solution in the case of a flatware with an internal depth of not more than 25 mm; (b) not more than 2.0mcg of lead per ml of leaching solution in the case of a small hollow-ware with a capacity of less than 1.1 liters but excluding cups and mugs; (c) not more than 1.0 mcg of lead per ml of leaching solution in the case of a large hollow-ware with a capacity of 1.1 liters or more but excluding pitchers; (d) not more than 0.5 mcg of lead per ml of leaching solution in the case of cups and mugs; and (e) not more than 0.5 mcg of lead per ml of leaching solution in the case of pitchers. The use of lead piping for the conveyance of beer, cider or other beverages or liquid food is also prohibited. SECTION IV. FOOD ADDITIVES REGULATIONS: Foods containing additives are not permitted for sale in Singapore unless the food additives of the description for are of an amount appropriate to the quantity of such specified food are in accordance with the Food Regulations. The purity of permitted food additives must conform to the specifications in the Food Regulations. If the Food Regulations do not contain reference to the purity of the permitted food additive, AVA will make reference to the specifications as recommended by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) Expert Committee on food additives. GAIN REPORT Page 13 The Singapore Food Regulations contain comprehensive regulations relating to food additives and their use in food and drinks manufactured, imported and sold in Singapore. These regulations cover the following: (1) Anti-caking agents (2) Anti foaming agents (3) Anti-oxidants (4) Sweetening agents (covered in latter part of this report) (5) Chemical preservatives, (6) Coloring matter (7) Emulsifiers and stabilizers (8) Flavoring agents (9) Flavor enhancers (10) Humectants (11) Nutrient supplements (12) Sequestrants (13) Gaseous packaging agents (14) General purpose food additives The Singapore Food Regulations provide: (1) official definitions of additives; (2) details of additives that are permitted for use in Singapore including their permitted uses and or proportions of use and (3) specific labeling requirements. The Singapore Food Regulations on food additives are to be read and interpreted with reference to the following detailed schedules to the Food Regulations: Third Schedule defines: Permitted oxidants, their use and the amounts that are permitted in specified foods, including processed foods, unprocessed foods and some food ingredients. Fourth Schedule defines: The range of specific permitted chemical preservatives, their use and the amounts that are permitted in specific foods, including processed foods, unprocessed foods and some food ingredients. Chemical preservatives are divided into 2 classes which are: (a) Class I: chemical preservatives such as: (i) common salt; (ii) sugars; (iii) vinegar or acetic acid, ascorbic acid, erythorbic acid, citric acid, malic acid, phosphoric acid, or tartaric acid or the calcium, potassium or sodium salts of any of the acids specified her; and (iv) ethyl alcohol or potable spirits; (b) Class II: chemical preservatives such as: (i) sulphur dioxide; (ii) benzoic acid; (iii) methyl para- hydroxy-benzoae or propyl para-hydroxy-benzoate; (iv) sorbic acid; (v) propionic acid; (vi) nitrates; (vii) nitrates and (viii) dimethyl dicarbonate. Fifth Schedule defines: Permitted coloring matters; synthetic organic and other colors. Sixth Schedule defines: Permitted emulsifiers and stabilizers. Seventh Schedule defines: Permitted nutrient supplement Eighth Schedule defines: Permited general purpose food additives Ninth Schedule defines: Food with maximum amounts of pesticide content that specific types of food and drinks may contain. If a particular pesticide is not found in the schedule, the Codex GAIN REPORT Page 14 Alimentarius Commission recommendations would be consulted. Tenth Schedule defines: Permitted maximum amount of arsenic, lead and cooper in the type of food. Eleventh Schedule defines: Microbiological standards for milk powder, buttermilk powder, pasteurized milk, ice cream, cooked crab meat, prawns and shrimps, mollusk ready for consumption, edible gelatin, fish ready for consumption, pastry, meat ready for consumption and any solid or liquid food ready for consumption. Key point to note: As AVA periodically updates regulations to take into account new products, new risks and new scientific findings on pesticides and other contaminants in foods, the contents of the above schedules would change. U.S. exporters and their importers are strongly advised to review the most up-to-date content of the schedules online or in consultation with the relevant authorities to ensure that their products are in compliance with the Singapore Food Regulations. SECTION V. PESTICIDES AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS: Under the Singapore Food Regulations, foods containing incidental constituents, i.e. any extraneous substance, toxic substance, pesticide, heavy metal, antibiotic, oestrogen or mycotoxin that is introduced into or on a food are not permitted. Foods containing pesticide residue, other than those specified and in the proportion as in the Ninth Schedule are not permitted. When it is not provided in the Ninth Schedule, the Codex Alimentarius Commission recommendations would be used. As specified in the Singapore Food Regulations, foods containing the following are not permitted for import and sale in Singapore: Foods containing arsenic, lead and copper in amounts in excess of those specified in the Tenth Schedule are not permitted for import and sale in Singapore. Seaweed which contains inorganic arsenic in excess of 2 ppm are not permitted. Any Fish or fish products containing mercury in excess of 0.5 ppm and 0.05 ppm for any other food. Tin in excess of 250 ppm are not permitted. Molluscs/dried mushrooms containing cadmium in excess of 1 ppm, or any seaweed containing cadmium in excess of 2 ppm, or any cocoa or coa products containing cadmium in excess of 0.5, or any other food containing cadmium in excess of 0.2 ppm. Antimony in excess of 1 ppm are not permitted. Antibiotic residues and or detectable antibiotic residues or their degradation products in milk, meat and meat products, or any other food intended for human consumption. However, Nisin (which have been sufficiently heat processed to destroy spores of Clostridium botulinum) may be used in the preservation of cheese and canned foods. Oestrogen residues in meat or any food derived from meat which contains residues of the following compounds: (a) diethylstilbestrol (3, 4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-3hexene); (c) hexoestrol (3, 4-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-n-hexane); (c) dienoestrol (3,4-bis(p- hydroxyphenyl)-2, 4-hexadiene). GAIN REPORT Page 15 Mycotoxins. Food containing alfatoxin B1 or total aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) in excess of 5 parts per billion are not permitted. Milk containing alfatoxin M1 in excess of 0.5 parts per billion is also not permitted. Patulin in excess of 50 parts per billion for fruit; or food containing fruit juice as ingredient are not allowed as well. 3-monochloropropane-1,2diol (3-MCPD) in excess of 20 parts per billion, calculated on 40% dry matter content, in any soy sauce or oyster sauce is not permitted. Microbiological contamination. (1) Foods which are ready for human consumption must not be contaminated with Escherichia coli exceeding 20 per gm or per ml in the case of liquid food or with any pathogenic micro-organism. (2) Any food specified in column 1 of the Eleventh Schedule (Microbiological standards) has to comply with the standard specified in columns 2 and 3 of that Schedule. (3) The mould count for tomato products shall be such that the percentage of positive fields shall not be more than 20% for tomato juice and 40% for other comminuted tomato products, including ketcup, puree and paste. (4) The percentage of microscopic fields shall be examined in accordance with the method laid down by the “Association of Official Agricultural Chemists” of the United States. SECTION VI. OTHER REGULATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS: A. General Food Control Programs In Singapore, all meat, fish and egg processing establishments, cold stores and slaughter-houses must be licensed by the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) before they are permitted to carry out any food processing or storage for wholesale distribution. They are subjected to regular inspections by AVA who conducts regular, scheduled and unannounced inspections to ensure that the food produced are safe and fit for human consumption. The frequency of checks depends on the sanitary conditions of the premises. Areas of checks include the general cleanliness and hygiene of the premises and workers; documentation and status of rectification of the shortcomings observed in earlier inspection visits. AVA also provides advice on GMPs (Good Manufacturing Practices) and food safety programs such as HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point). AVA may collect samples GAIN REPORT Page 16 from the licensed establishments for laboratory analysis to ensure compliance with the Sale Food Act and the Food Regulations. All food establishments in Singapore, including meat/fish/egg processing establishments, cold storages, slaughter-houses and processed food establishments are categorized into four grades; A for Excellent, B for Good, C for Average and D for Pass based on their food hygiene and food safety standards. They are graded prior to the expiry of its licence and are reassessed annually. AVA’s aim of grading such establishments is to enable food manufacturers to be aware of their hygiene and food safety standards and the need for improvements. The system also allows for identification of the lower grade establishments so that more regulatory efforts and more frequent checks will be directed at them. B. Import Requirements for Specific Food Products (source: www.ava.gov.sg) (1) Dairy Products from Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) affected Countries. The following are import requirements for dairy products (liquid milk, cheese, butter, ice-cream, yoghurt, milk powder) from FMD affected countries: a. Submission of a documentary proof (one time submission) that dairy products are manufactured in premises regulated by a competent authority (for e.g. a certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence) b. Submission of a health certificate (for every consignment) stating that the dairy raw ingredient has been subjected to one of the following procedures: (i) a sterilization process applying a minimum temperature of 132o C for at least one second (ultra-high temperature [UHT]), or (ii) if the milk has a pH less than 7.0, a sterilization process applying a minimum temperature of 72 oC for at least 15 seconds (high temperature – short time pasteurization [HTST]), or (iii) if the milk has a pH of 7.0 or over, the HTST process applied twice. c. The Health Certificate should include the following information: (i) Description of the products including brand name and nature of product; (ii) Quantity in the appropriate units; (iii) Lot identifier and date of production; (iv) Name and address of the manufacturer or the processing establishment (v) Name and address of the importer or consignee; (vi) Name and address of the exporter of consignor; (vii) Country of dispatch; (viii) Country of destination Please refer to OIE website: http://www.oie.int/eng/Status/FMD/en_fmd_free.htm for a list of FMD free countries. (2) Pasteurized Liquid Milk from FMD-Free Countries. The following are import requirements for pasteurized liquid milk from FMD-free countries: a. Submission of a documentary proof (one time submission) that products are manufactured in GAIN REPORT Page 17 premises regulated by a competent authority (e.g. a certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence) b. Submission of health certificate (for every consignment) that pasteurized liquid milk are: (i) produced using milk ingredients originating from FMD free countries; (ii) has been pasteurized by heating at a minimum temperature of 72oC for a minimum of 15 seconds or an equivalent process. c. The Health Certificate should include the following information: (i) Description of the products including brand name and nature of product; (ii) Quantity in the appropriate units; (iii) Lot identifier and date of production; (iv) Name and address of the manufacturer or the processing establishment (v) Name and address of the importer or consignee; (vi) Name and address of the exporter of consignor; (vii) Country of dispatch; (viii) Country of destination For a list of FMD free countries, please refer to OIE website at: http://www.oie.int/eng/Status/FMD/en_fmd_free.htm (3) Infant Formula for Age 0 – 12 Months. The following are import requirements for infant formula, and follow-on formula (age 0-12 months): a. Submission of documentary proof (one time submission) that the imported infant formulas are manufactured in a premise regulated by the competent authority (e.g. certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence), b. FMD-free Countries. Submission of the health certificate that must contain the following attestation by the relevant competent authority of the exporting country: (i) products are produced using milk ingredients originating from FMD free countries and (ii) liquid milk used is pasteurized by heating at a min 72oC for a minimum 15 seconds or an equivalent process. c. FMD-affected Countries. Submission of the health certificate that must contain the following attestation by the relevant competent authority of the exporting country: (i) a sterilization process applying a minimum temperature of 132o C for at least one second (ultra-high temperature [UHT]), OR (ii) if the milk has a pH less than 7.0, a sterilization process applying a minimum temperature of 72oC for at least 15 seconds (high temperature – short time pasteurization [HTST]), OR (iii) if the milk has a pH of 7.0 or over, the HTST process applied twice. d. The health certificate should include the following information: (i) Description of the products including brand name and nature of product; (ii) Quantity in the appropriate units; (iii) Lot identifier and date of production; (iv) Name and address of the manufacturer or the processing establishment (v) Name and address of the importer or consignee; (vi) Name and address of the exporter of consignor; (vii) Country of dispatch; (viii) Country of destination GAIN REPORT Page 18 e. Submission of health certificate or manufacturer quality control (QC) reports on chemical and microbiological test (every consignment): Laboratory Report Submitted by Importer Chemical Microbiological Powdered formulas Powdered formulas and Liquid formulas in hermetically sealed containers. 1. Total Colony count 2. *Total Coliform 1. Aflatoxin M1 3. *Fecal coliform 4. *Escherichia oli 5. *Enterobacter sakazakii (Cronobacter spp) 6. Salmonella spp. 7. Staphylococcus enterotoxin (or Stapylococcus aureus) Liquid formulas in hermetically sealed containers Sterility test *Enterobacteriaceae test can be accepted as a test method for total coliform, faecal coliform, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter sakazakii (Cronobacter spp). Importers may be required to test for the following parameters upon AVA’s request: #Chemical: Heavy metals, Melamine, Pesticide residues, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ##Microbiological: Clostridium botulinum, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus enterotoxins. (4) Infant Cereals. The following are import requirements for infant cereals: (a) Submission of documentary proof (one time submission) that the imported products are manufactured in a premise regulated by the competent authority (for e.g. certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence) (b) Submission of Chemical test report (every consignment) Laboratory Report Submitted by Importer (every consignment) Chemical Aflatoxin B1 (5) Traditional Cakes & Nasi Lemak. The import requirements for traditional cakes (Malay kueh such an onde-onde, kueh lepat pisang, seri-pinang, etc. and Chinese kueh such as ang ku kueh, GAIN REPORT Page 19 soon kueh, carrot cake) and nasi lemak are as follows: (a) Submission of documentary proof (one time submission) that the imported products are manufactured in a premise regulated by the competent authority (for e.g. certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence), (b) Submission of microbiological test report (monthly submission). Laboratory Report Submitted by Importer (monthly) Microbiological Total colony count Fecal coliform E. coli Staphylococcus aureus Bacillus cereus (6). Coconut Products – Coconut Milk, Grated Coconut, Jelly Coconut, Shelled Coconut, Desiccated Coconut. The following are import requirements for coconut products: (a) Submission of documentary proof (one time submission) that the imported products are manufactured in a premise regulated by the competent authority (e.g. certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence), (b) Submission of microbiological report (once every 6 months). Laboratory Report Submitted by Importer (once every 6 months) Microbiological Total colony count Fecal coliform E. coli Salmonella Staphylococcus enterotoxins (7). Minimally Processed Cut/Peeled Fruits and Vegetables. The import requirements for minimally processed cut and peeled fruits and vegetables are tabulated as follows: (a) Submission of documentary proof (one time submission) that the imported products are manufactured in a premise regulated by the competent authority (for e.g. certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence). (b) Submission of microbiological and chemical laboratory reports will only be required once in six months for the import of MP fruits and MP leafy vegetables (e.g. lettuce, cabbage, cai xin, etc.). Laboratory reports will not be required for the import of non-leafy MP vegetables (e.g. onions, potatoes, carrots, water chestnuts, etc.) Laboratory Report Submitted by Importer (once every 6 months) GAIN REPORT Page 20 Chemical Microbiological for ready-to-eat only e.g. salad, cut fruits, etc. Pesticide Residues Total colony count Organochlorines Fecal coliform Organophosphates E. coli Dithiocarbamates N-Methylcarbamates Prethroids (c) Product label. Pre-packed ready-to-eat minimally processed fruits and vegetables are required to date-marked. (8). Minimally Processed Cut Sugar Cane. The import requirements for cut sugar cane are tabulated as follows:- (a) Registration of importers and registered products of cut sugar cane. (i) All cut sugar cane must be obtained from producers registered and certified by the relevant authority of the exporting countries. (ii) All importers are required to register with AVA’s Quarantine & Inspection Department (QID) and produce documentary proof that the producer of their cut sugar cane is registered and certified by relevant authority of the exporting country. AVA (QID) will issue a Registration Number and an Establishment Code to the importer of each successful application. (b) Cut sugar cane to be cleaned, boxed and transported in covered vehicles. (c) Permit Application. When applying for import permits, importers should declare their AVA (QID) Registration Number in the Licence Number field, correct HS and Product Codes, and Establishment Code in the TradeNet system. The HS and Product Code is as follows: HS Code Product Code Product Description Unit 12129919 Z1POSCOFRRD Sugarcane, Fresh or Chilled, Either cut or Peeled (Other Than Whole) TNE (d) Product labeling. Importers are to ensure that the boxes containing the cut sugar cane are properly labeled with the type/variety of sugar cane, address of farm, net weight, name and address of importer, country of origin and storage condition. (9) Mooncakes. The import requirements are as follows: (a) Submission of documentary proof (one time submission that the imported products are manufactured in a premise regulated and inspected by the competent authority (e.g. certified true copy of the manufacturer’s licence), (b) Submission of Microbiological and chemical test report for every type of mooncakes (every consignment). GAIN REPORT Page 21 Laboratory Report Submitted by Importer Chemical Microbiological Test on mooncakes: Total colony count Sulphur dioxide Fecal coliform Benzoic acid E. coli Methyl-p benzoate Staphylococcus aureus Proply-p benzoate Salmonella Sorbic acid Bacillus cereus Test on egg yolk: Listeria monocytogenes (for snow skin mooncakes only) Sudan I, II, III & IV Para Red (10). Processed Land Snail and Snail Caviar. The import requirements are: (a) The land snails (e.g. escargot) must be farmed and not wild. (b) Documentary proof (one time submission) that the farm and/or processing plants are regulated by the relevant authorities (c) Health certificate (every consignment) to certify that the products are safe for consumption. (d) The health certificate should include the following information: i. Description of the products including brand name and nature of product; ii. Quantity in the appropriate units; iii. Lot identifier and date of production; iv. Name and address of the manufacturer or the processing establishment; v. Name and address of the importer or consignee; vi. Name and address of the exporter or consignor; vii. Country of dispatch; viii. Country of destination (11) Beef extract and any food products containing beef extract. The import requirements for beef extract and food products containing beef extract such as beef cube, beef juices, beef gelatin, are as follows: (a) Import from Non Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) affected countries or Non Mad Cow Disease affected countries: Submission of health certificate (every consignment), which must contain the following attestation by the veterinary authority of the exporting country: (i) The date and the origin of the beef extract, beef ingredients or any other beef products and (ii) The product does not come from BSE affected countries. (b) The health certificate should include the following information: i. Description of the products including brand name and nature of product; ii. Quantity in the appropriate units; iii. Lot identifier and date of production; GAIN REPORT Page 22 iv. Name and address of the manufacturer or the processing establishment; v. Name and address of the importer or consignee; vi. Name and address of the exporter or consignor; vii. Country of dispatch; viii. Country of destination Please refer to OIE wesite: http://www.oie.int/en/animal-health-in-the-world/official-disease- status/bse/list-of-bse-risk-status/ for a list of BSE free countries. (12) Bottled Mineral and Drinking Water. The importers are required to submit to AVA’s Quarantine & Inspection Department (QID) the following documents: (a) Mineral Water (including spring water and mountain spring water) i. The original copy of the authentication certificate issued by the relevant controlling authority of the country of origin to certify that the mineral water is genuine. ii. The certificate should indicate the brand name, type of water, packing size/type, batch number/expiry date, name and address of manufacturer iii. A site plan showing the water source (b) Drinking Water (including distilled water, drinking water, mineralized water and reverse osmosis water, etc.) i. A copy of the licence of the factory where the water was processed and bottled. (c) These documents are to be submitted to AVA (QID) for every new brand of bottled mineral and drinking water imported by the importer before commencement of import. (d) Product label: (i) Bottled drinking water must be properly labeled with the name of the product, the country of origin and the name and address of the importer in Singapore and (ii) Bottled mineral drinking water must be properly labeled with the name of the product, the country of origin and the name and address of the importer in Singapore, name and location of the source of water and the analytical composition giving characteristics to the natural mineral water. In addition, natural mineral water that contains more than 1 ppm of fluoride will be required to be labeled with the words “contains fluoride” as part of, or in close proximity to the name of of the product, or in an otherwise prominent position. Where the natural mineral water contains more than 1.5 ppm of fluoride, the label must contain the following statement in addition to the words “contains fluoride”: “The product is not suitable for infants and children under the age of seven years.” e. Health certificate (every consignment) to reflect the results of the test parameters as specified below: GAIN REPORT Page 23 Mineral/Spring Water Drinking water other than mineral/spring water Analysis Limits Analysis Limits Required Required Microbiological parameters Total Colony count at 370C Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 100,000 per ml for 48 hr 100,000 per ml Total coliforms Yes Not detectable Yes Not detectable per 100 ml per 250 ml Fecal coliforms Yes Not detectable Yes Not detectable per 100 ml per 250 ml E.Coli Yes Not detectable Yes Not detectable per 100 ml per 250 ml Fecal streptococci Yes Not detectable Yes Not detectable per 250 ml per 250 ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa Yes Not detectable Yes Not detectable per 250 ml per 250 ml Sporulate sulphite- Yes Not detectable Yes Not detectable per 50 ml reducing anaerobes per 50 ml Chemical Parameters Antimony NA Not more than Yes Not more than 0.005 ppm 0.005 ppm Arsenic Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.01 ppm 0.01 ppm Calculated as As Bromate Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 10 ppb 10 ppb Barium Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.7 ppm 0.7 ppm Borate Yes Not more than NA NA 5 ppm calculated as B Boron NA NA Yes Not more than 0.5 ppm Cadmium Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.003 ppm 0.003 ppm Chromium Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.05 ppm 0.05 ppm Calculated as Cr Copper Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 2 ppm 1 ppm Cyanide Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.07 ppm 0.07 ppm Fluoride Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 1.5 ppm 2 ppm calculated as GAIN REPORT Page 24 - F Lead Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.01 ppm 0.01 ppm Manganese Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.4 ppm 0.4 ppm Mercury Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.006 ppm for inorganic 0.001 ppm mercury Nickel NA Not more than Yes Not more than 0.07 ppm 0.02 ppm Nitrate Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 50 ppm calculated as 50 ppm NO -3 calculated as NO -3 Nitrite Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 3 ppm calculated as 0.1 ppm NO -2 calculated as NO -2 Organic matter calculated Yes Not more than NA NA as O2 3 ppm Selenium Yes Not more than Yes Not more than 0.01 ppm 0.01 ppm Sulphide Yes Not more than NA NA 0.05 ppm calculated as H2S Trihalomethanes: NA NA Yes The sum of the ratio of the Bromoform concentration of each to its respective Dibromochloromet hane limit value should not exceed 1 Bromodichloromet hane Not more than 100 ppb for Bromoform Chloroform & Dibro. Not more than 60 ppb for Bronodichloromethane & Not more than 300 ppb for Chloroform Chloride NA NA Yes Not more than 250 ppm (13) Ice. The import requirements are: (a) Submission of a copy of the licence of the factory where the ice is processed. (b) The ice is required to be prepacked, and the packaging of ice should be of food-grade quality. (c) The prepacked ice is required to be labeled according to Regulation 5 of the Singapore Food Regulations and the word “food-grade” should appear on the label. (d) All pre-packed ice must be transported in refrigerated trucks. The vehicles used in the transportation must be in a clean and hygienic condition. (e) Submission of microbiological and chemical test reports (quarterly basis) to reflect the test parameters as specified below: GAIN REPORT Page 25 Ice Microbiological parameters Limits Total Colony count at 37oC Not more than 100,000 per ml FOR 48 hr Total coliforms Not detectable per 100 ml Fecal coliforms Not detectable per 100 ml E. coli Not detectable per 100 ml Fecal streptococci Not detectable per 250 ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa Not detectable per 250 ml Sporulate sulphite-reducing Not detectable per 50 ml anerobes Chemical parameters Antimony Not more than 0.005 ppm Arsenic Not more than 0.01 ppm Bromate Not more than 10 ppb Barium Not more than 0.7 ppm Baron Not more than 0.5 ppm Cadmium Not more than 0.003 ppm Chromium Not more than 0.05 ppm Copper Not more than 2 ppm Cyanide Not more than 0.07ppm Fluoride Not more than 1.5 ppm Lead Not more than 0.01 ppm Mercury Not more than 0.006 ppm for inorganic mercury Nickel Not more than 0.07 ppm Nitrate Not more than 50 ppm calculated as NO -3 Nitrite Not more than 3 ppm calcula -ted as NO2 Selenium Not more than 0.01 ppm Trihalomethanes: The sum of the ratio of the concentration of each to its respective limit value should not exceed 1 Bromoform Dibromochloromethane Not more than 100 ppb for Bromoform & Dibro. Not more than 60 ppb for Bromodichloromethane Bronodichloromethane & Not more than 300 ppb for Chloroform Chloroform Chloride Not more than 250 ppm (14) Soy Sauce & Oyster Sauce. Soy sauces oyster sauces and sauces containing soy or oyster sauce as an ingredient, must not be detected with more than 0.02 ppm of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3- MCPD). First time importers of these products are required to submit the test report to AVA (QID) (only one submission) for consideration before importation. The requirements for 3-MCPD laboratory and analytical report as follows: (a) Laboratory. The 3-MCPD laboratory engaged for analyzing and testing of the product must be an accredited and independent laboratory. The method of analysis for 3-MCPD is GC/MS, and GAIN REPORT Page 26 must have a detection limit of 0.01 ppm. (b) Analytical Report. The report must indicate the following: i. Brand name; ii. Type and grade of sauce; iii. Country of origin; iv. Batch number/expiry date; v. Name and country of laboratory; vi. Date of laboratory test; vii. % dry matter; viii. Level of 3-MCPD detected (fresh weight); & ix. Detection limit: 0.01 ppm/10 pp (c) The permissible level of 3-MCPD is based on 40% dry matter in the product. The level of 3-MCPD (fresh weight) and the % dry matter will allow the computation of the level of 3-MCPD based on 40% dry matter. 3-MCPD (based on 40% dry matter) = 3-MCPD (fresh weight)/% dry matter X 40% dry matter (15) Absinthe. The alcoholic beverage, absinthe may be imported and sold in Singapore provided that the following requirements are met: (i) thujone (alpha and beta) in the alcoholic beverage does not exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) if the alcoholic beverage contains not more than 25% alcohol. (ii) thujone (alpha and beta) in the alcoholic beverage does not exceed 10 parts per million (ppm) if the alcoholic beverage contains more than 25 alcohol. Importers are required to submit both the laboratory analysis report indicating the level of thujone present, as well as documentary proof from the relevant authority in the country of origin confirming that the product is allowed for sale, when applying for import permit via TradeNet system. GAIN REPORT Page 27 (16) Other Imported Food Products. Submission of laboratory test report to AVA is currently not required. However, products may be subjected to inspection and sampling by AVA. Importers may wish to test for the following test parameters. The specific parameters to be tested for each food product will be dependent on the risk and hazards associated with the food. The list provided below is not exhaustive and importers/local manufacturers are required to ensure that their products comply fully with the requirements of the Food Regulations. Examples of chemical tests Examples of microbiological tests Pesticide residues Colony count/plate count Organochlorines Coliforms Pyrethroids Faecal coliform N-methyl carbamates Escherichia coli Dithiocarbamates Escherichia coli O157 Organophosphates Salmondella Bacillus cerenus Preservatives Bacillus enterotoxins Benzoic acid Clostridium perfringens Boric acid Listeria monocytogenes Sulphur dioxide Staphylococcus aureus Methyl-p-benzoate Staphylococcus enterotoxins Propyl paraben Clostridum botulinum Propyl-p-benzoate Formaldehyde Metals Arsenic Antimony Cadmium Copper Lead Mercury Tin Selenium Inorganic arsenic Mycotoxins Aflatoxins (B1 & 2, G1 & 2) Ochratoxin A Fumonisins Deoxynivalenol Zearalenone GAIN REPORT Page 28 Colors Para Red Sudan I, II, III, V Chrysoidine Basic yellow Sweetening agents Acesulfame-K Suralose Stevioside Saccharin Cyclamate Rebaudioside Others Bromate (17) Rice Under the Price Control (Rice) Order 1990, all rice traders (importers and exporters) and wholesalers must be licensed holders. For more information on the licences for rice, please refer to: International Enterprise (IE) Singapore 230 Victoria Street #10-00 Bugis Junction Office Tower Singapore 188024 Tel: (65) 6433 4792 Fax: (65) 6337 8158 Website: http://www.iesingapore.com C. Import Requirements for Meat, Poultry, Fish and their products, Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, Eggs and Processed Foods. Meat & Poultry Products. The import of meat products is regulated under the Wholesale Meat and Fish Act and its subsidiary legislations. Meat products include the whole carcass or the parts of any animal or bird. They may be imported in chilled, frozen, processed or canned forms. Meat products may only be imported into Singapore from approved sources. A list of countries and establishments which are approved to export meat to Singapore can be obtained from the AVA website, www.ava.gov.sg. Every consignment of meat products imported must be accompanied by a Health Certificated issued by a veterinary authority of the exporting country, certifying that Singapore’s animal health and food safety requirements have been complied with. Other supporting documents GAIN REPORT Page 29 like bills of lading, airway bills and invoices should also be submitted. Meat products must be shipped direct from the country of export. Every consignment of meat products imported will be inspected by the AVA before sale is permitted. Sampling for laboratory analysis may be required. Some consignments may be placed on “hold and test” pending the outcome of the laboratory analysis. Every carton and basic packaging unit of meat and meat product imported must be labeled with the following particulars: i. A description of the meat product; ii. The country from which the meat product originates; iii. The brand name of the meat product, if any; iv. The name and designation number of the processing establishment in which, and the date on which, the meat product was processed, if applicable; v. In the case of a processed meat product, the name and designation number of the slaughter-house in which the animals used in the production of such meat product were slaughtered and the date of the slaughter vi. The name and designation number of the establishment in which, and the date on which, the meat product was packed; vii. The batch number and, where the meat product is canned, the canning code. viii. The net weight of meat product as contained in each basic packaging and outer carton. Fish Products. The import of fish for food is regulated under the Wholesome Meat and Fish Act and its subsidiary legislation. Fish products refer to any of the varieties of marine, brackish water or fresh water fishes, crustacean, aquatic mollusca, marine sponges, trepang and any other form of aquatic life and their young and eggs, but excluding the ornamental varieties. Fish products may be in chilled, frozen, processed or canned forms. Fish may be imported from any country, however, the following restrictions apply: (i) The import of chilled shucked raw oyster, chilled cockle meat, chilled cooked prawn/shrimp and chilled crab meat is prohibited for food safety reasons. (ii) Live oysters may only be imported from countries which meet AVA’s requirements for a shellfish sanitation program. The countries currently approved for such exports are Australia, Canada, France, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, United Kingdom and USA. An import permit issued by the AVA, is required for every consignment of fish products. Imp
Posted: 21 December 2012

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