Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

An Expert's View about Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in Taiwan

Posted on: 27 Nov 2011

Taiwan recognizes that agricultural biotechnology is a potential tool for the solution of food security concerns caused due to climate change and global population growth. However, Taiwan is cautious about coexistence farming among organic, biotech and conventional crops especially given the fact that the average farm size is just over one hectare and Taiwan's arable land is only about one-fourth of the total land area.

THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT POLICY Required Report - public distribution Date: 10/6/2011 GAIN Report Number: TW11013 Taiwan Agricultural Biotechnology Annual An Update Approved By: Chris Frederick Prepared By: Chiou Mey Perng Report Highlights: Taiwan is the sixth largest export market for U.S. food and agricultural products. Its demand for corn, soybeans and cotton, of which is entirely met by imports, accounted for US$1.45 billion or 44 percent of the total U.S. exports of agricultural, fish and forest products to Taiwan in 2010. As of September 8, 2011, Taiwan has granted approvals for feed and processing use of seven single biotech soybean events, fifteen single corn events and twenty four stacked events. Section I. Executive Summary: Taiwan recognizes that agricultural biotechnology is a potential tool for the solution of food security concerns caused due to climate change and global population growth. However, Taiwan is cautious about coexistence farming among organic, biotech and conventional crops especially given the fact that the average farm size is just over one hectare and Taiwan's arable land is only about one-fourth of the total land area. While there is considerable ongoing biotech research in Taiwan, environmental release for commercial cultivation on the island is unlikely in the near future. Only biotech products for non food or ornamental use are likely to be approved. Taiwan continues to improve or establish its regulatory system of risk management for biotech products. On April 13, 2011, Taiwan promulgated the regulations governing the propagation and cultivation of aquatic animals and plants, which paves the way for commercialization of infertile GM fluorescent fish. Taiwan is the sixth largest export market for U.S. food and agricultural products. Its demand for corn, soybeans and cotton, of which is entirely met by imports, accounted for US$1.45 billion or 44 percent of the total U.S. exports of agricultural, fish and forest products to Taiwan in 2010. As of September 8, 2011, Taiwan has granted approvals for feed and processing use of seven single biotech soybean events, fifteen single corn events and twenty four stacked events. Taiwan currently regulates only corn and soybeans and their products derived from recombinant-DNA. Pre-market approval for biotech soybean and corn imports is required for food, feed or processing use (FFP use). Biotech food labeling for corn and soy products and approval of all corn and soy events are mandatory since January 2003. Labeling tolerance level is 5 percent, and non-GM labeling is on a voluntary basis. In 2009, Taiwan notified the WTO of its intention to extend its biotech food safety regulatory scope to cover other biotech products beyond corn and soybeans. However, there is still no movement on the expansion of Taiwan's biotech regulatory scope. Taiwan also is considering amendments to the Patent Law that will provide more intellectual property rights protection for biotech products and/or the technology. An amendment bill to the Patent Law entered the second reading in the current legislature on September 16, 2011. The Patent Law amendment must pass three readings in the legislature to succeed. Section II. Plant Biotechnology Trade and Production: A. Commercial Production of Biotechnology Crops In spite of several promising events developed in local laboratories and tested in field trials, Taiwan has yet to legally commercialize a single biotech crop. Some of the reasons for the delay are political, but others are related to insufficient capacity building. Researchers in Taiwan academic institutions lack experience in putting an event through the regulatory process, and regulations for risk management in the cultivation of biotech crops are still under development, with coexistence and liability/redress being the major concerns. Taiwan is cautious about coexistence farming among organic, biotech and conventional crops especially given the fact that the average farm size is just over one hectare and Taiwan's arable land is only about one-fourth of the total land area. While there is considerable ongoing biotech research in Taiwan, environmental release for commercial cultivation on the island is unlikely in the near future. Only biotech products for non food or ornamental use are likely to be approved. The environmental release, cultivation and marketing of any unapproved biotech product is in violation of Taiwan law as stipulated in the Plant Variety and Plant Seeds Act (amended 04/21/2004 to adopt biotechnology) for crops, the Animal Industry Act (amended July 4, 2007) for poultry and livestock breeding stocks, and the Fishery Act (amended January 1, 2008) for aquatic plants and animals. B. Biotechnology Crops under Development There are no biotechnology crops currently under development on Taiwan that are expected to be on the market in the near future. However, several rice, fruit and vegetable varieties are in field trials. Taiwan has established public field trials facilities at the Council of Agriculture (COA) affiliated research institutes. COA celebrated the grand opening of its very first biotech plant field trial facility at the Taiwan Agriculture Research Institute (TARI) located in central Taiwan in late April 2007. There are now four other COA certified field trial facilities for biotech plants, which are situated in the National Chung Hsing University, Academia Sinica, the World Vegetable Center (former AVRDC) and one private research facility. C. Imports of Biotechnology Crops/Products Taiwan is the United States' sixth largest agricultural export market. In 2010, the United States exported more than US$3.29 billion of agricultural, fish and forest products to Taiwan, of which biotech products accounted for NT$1.45 billion. U.S. soybean exports to Taiwan totaled US$653 million, while corn exports were valued at US$613 million and cotton at US$189 million. In 2010, Taiwan was the fifth largest export market for both U.S. corn and soybeans and the seventh largest for U.S. cotton. Around half of the total U.S. agricultural, fish and forest products exports to Taiwan are biotech products. Taiwan?s existing biotech regulations only regulate biotech corn and soybeans and their products. Taiwan requires premarket approval for GM soybeans and corn for food, feed or processing use (FFP use), but it doesn't require market approval for GM cotton imports because cotton is not for food use. Taiwan cannot sign the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (CPB) because it is not internationally recognized as a sovereign state. In the past, however, Taiwan has unilaterally implemented some international agreements and has incorporated Cartagena guidelines into its import-export regulations governing biotech products such as seeds for planting. COA?s Bureau of Animal and Plant Inspection and Quarantine (BAPHIQ) is the lead agency on the issue. In July 2005, BAPHIQ promulgated and implemented the "Measure on Import/Export Permit of Transgenic Plant". BAPHIQ requires import/export approval for all GM plants for environmental release or cultivation. To date, BAPHIQ has approved only a few import/export records for experimental use. D. Food Aid With an ample domestic supply of staple rice and overall economic strength, Taiwan is not a food aid recipient and is not likely to become one under the current circumstances. E. Production of Biotechnology Crops That Were Developed Outside of the United States At present, Taiwan does not commercially produce biotechnology crops developed from any origin because there is at present no for legal basis for commercializing biotech products. Section III. Plant Biotechnology Policy: A. Regulatory Framework for Agricultural Biotechnology Taiwan has adopted a U.S. style interagency coordination approach to regulate biotechnology. The Department of Health's Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) is responsible for the food safety assessment for premarket approval and GM labeling for packaged food products, while the Council of Agriculture (COA) is in charge of the biosafety assessment of the environmental release for commercialization and usage in animal feed. COA also governs trans-boundary movement of LMOs (living modified organisms). TFDA conducts monitory import inspections and market surveillance inspection on biotech soybeans and corn and their products, and compliance with biotech labeling regulation. The National Science Council (NSC) supervises safety laboratory works in biotechnology. The final authority for Taiwan?s biotechnology regulatory system is held by an appointed minister- without-portfolio who serves as the convener of the advisory committee for GM products and also oversees the office of Science and Technology Advisory Group (STAG) under the Executive Yuan. The STAG office serves as the Secretariat to the interagency advisor for GM products. B. Biotechnology Crops Approved for Food, Feed and Processing (FFP), but Not for Environmental Uses The existing agricultural biotechnology regulations enforced by the TFDA are premarket approvals for FFP use only and apply to soybeans, corn and their related products. No bioengineered soybeans or corn may be produced, processed, prepared, packed, and imported or exported unless registered. All bioengineered varieties of soybeans and corn must be registered and granted premarket approvals by the TFDA. As of September 8, 2011, Taiwan has granted registration approvals for a total of 22 single biotech events, including seven for soybeans and 15 for corn, as well as 24 stacked corn events, including 13 two-way events, six three-way events and five four-way events. The current approval list is attached to the end of report. For an updated list, please visit the Taiwan FDA website. The registration is valid for five years for FFP, but not for environmental release or plantation. Renewal of registration is required before its expiry. Although the COA has not yet amended its Feed Control Act to adopt ingredients derived from biotechnology for feed rations, it is highly likely to follow a strategic policy that all approved products for food use are also eligible for animal feeds. As a practical matter, but unofficially, TFDA currently approves biotech events for both food and feed use. Taiwan implemented regulations for LMOs under the terms of its June 9, 2005 amended Plant Variety and Plant Seed Act to stipulate biotech products. The ?Rules for Approving Import/Export Transgenic Plants? were announced on July 7, 2005. Imported grains and soybeans for FFP use are excluded from the LMOs ruling, and importers are not required to apply for additional approvals from the Taiwan authorities at the Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine (BAPHIQ). C. Field Trials Taiwan has established field-testing regulations governing plants, livestock, poultry and fish after Taiwan promulgated its field testing regulation governing aquatic plants and animals in April 2009. None of the domestically developed GM products has completed the field trials, so nothing is in the pipeline for commercialization. Details are as follows: No updates since last annual report. Nine events were granted approval for conducting field tastings for bio-safety assessment. Their testing results are as follows: One, ornamented calla lily, applied for field-testing, but is still pending for approval to run field testing because the developer(s) didn't go further. Two events completed field testing. One conditionally passed, but the other didn?t pass the bio-safety assessment. Details follow: In July 2003, Taiwan conditionally approved a GM ring spot virus-resistant papaya. In June 2006, Taiwan disapproved one phytase rice variety developed by a private company, GeneTaiwan Co. The remaining seven events are still undergoing field testing. The seven events currently undergoing field testing for biosafety assessment: 1. Sweet rice for processing developed by Academia Sinica 2. Latoferri rice developed by National Chung Hsing University 3. Delay-ripening broccoli developed by Academia Sinica 4. Phytase potato developed by Academia Sinica 5. Cucumber mottle mosaic virus-resistant tomato developed by the World Vegetable Center (AVRDC) 6. Eucalyptus for pulping developed by COA affiliate Taiwan Forestry Research Institute 7. New developed ring spot and leaf distortion mosaic virus-resistant papaya D. Stacked Events Starting on May 6, 2008, Taiwan implemented stacked event registration (See GAIN report TW8025). The regulations require registration approval for new single events that are used to develop a new stacked event. The submission of dossier for the new stacked event will not be accepted by TFDA if the new single events are not yet approved by Taiwan. E. Taiwan?s policy on Coexistence between GM and non-GM Crops Currently Taiwan does not allow growing of GM crops outside of accredited field trial facilities. However, Taiwan has drafted regulations governing commercial production of biotech plants, animals, and aquatic plants and animals. All draft regulations for domestic cultivation are still pending approval. F. GM Labeling Guidelines Beginning in January 2005, all food made from biotech soybean or corn is required to be labeled. The tolerance level is 5%. The labeling regulations do not apply to products that do not contain pieces of transgene(s) or protein such as cornstarch, corn syrup, corn oil, soy oil, and soy sauce. Soybean or corn food products that are not packaged for retail sale are not subject to the GM food-labeling requirement. This includes the large volume of products sold in wet markets, by street vendors or in glossary stores. However, on March 25, 2009, DOH announced a new labeling requirement for foods in bulk packaging. Starting January 1, 2010, all food products in bulk packaging for retail sale should indicate: (1) product name; and (2) country of origin on a card, logo (label), sign board, or some other means of prominently displaying this information in retail venues so that the product can be clearly identified by consumers. This is Taiwan?s first initiative requiring this kind of labeling for marketing food in bulk. So far, this seems to have had no influence on biotech soybeans and corn products sold in bulk because freshly baked and cooked products that are served for direct consumption at dining places are excluded. It is customary in Taiwan to have freshly milled and cooked soy milk at breakfast shops. The labeling requirements have increased Taiwan?s demand for non-GM foods given the small but growing segment of Taiwan?s population that demands alternative, natural-grown or organic products as part of a larger movement for healthier eating/lifestyle. Soybean and corn food products made of non-GM materials can be labeled as Non-GM or Not-GM. If there is no biotech alternative available, a product may not be labeled ?Non-GM?. G. CODEX Taiwan is not a member of CODEX. However, Taiwan generally follows CODEX guidelines with regard to biotechnology in agriculture. Taiwan has drafted their low-level presence guidelines based on the Codex Annex on low level presence safety assessment, but has not yet implemented the guidelines. H. Potential Trade Barriers Despite incidences of commingled biotech events such as StarLink corn, LibertyLink Rice and Event 32 corn, there have been no trade disruptions of U.S. biotech corn exports to Taiwan. However, the LibertyLink Rice incidence has resulted in Taiwan's import suspension of U.S. long grain rice. Taiwan?s approval process has become increasingly efficient. The Genetically Modified Food Advisory Committee (GMFAC) has overcome meeting and scheduling problems and has enhanced communication among committee members, government and industry groups. However, many stacked events and new concepts of single events are entering the regulatory pipeline. Concerns have been raised regarding the GMFAC's workload. In particular, the TFDA will recruit new members for filling retiring members every other year. The next recruitment is scheduled for January 2012. It will take some time for new committee members to become familiar with the approval process. Assessment capacity building for new committee members is essential according to TFDA. I. Intellectual Property Rights GM plants products are protected under the Plant Variety and Plant Seed Act, but GM animals and aquatic plants and fish are not protected under this Act. Taiwan is in the process of establishing patent laws for protecting all GM technology and GM products, and Taiwan's biotech patent rights bill is pending legislative approval. However, there is some opposition against biotech plant products. Section IV. Plant Biotechnology Marketing Issues: A. Market Acceptance Consumer Perception: Taiwan consumers are consuming soy products, tofu and soy milk, on a daily basis. They continue to purchase food in bulk from traditional wet markets and eat traditional Chinese breakfasts with soymilk made from biotech soybeans. However, consumption of processed non-biotech food such as soymilk and tofu is gradually increasing because local food companies use non-GM promotions as a marketing tool to create the image that non-GM food has better value or taste. Producers/Importers: As current labeling regulations govern soy or corn food products, some food packers are now promoting foods made of non-GM corn or soybeans. Retailers: Except for specialty organic food shops, most retail stores are remaining neutral and provide diverse brands or types of food products, both non-biotech and biotech. Currently, there is no country-specific study on the marketing of biotech food. B. Market Surveys Market surveys are not conducted by Taiwan authorities on a regular basis. DOH did conduct market surveys before implementing the GM labeling regulations. Section V. Plant Biotechnology Capacity Building and Outreach: A. U.S. Government Funded Outreach Activities Taiwan?s substantial agricultural research infrastructure, sound legal system, favorable climate and very strong information technology base have contributed to its ability to develop a world-class biotech sector. In addition, a science-based regulatory system and the relative lack of anti-biotech protectionist interests have given the public confidence in the safety of biotech foods. The primary focus is to build upon these strengths by enhancing Taiwan?s regulatory capacity and explaining the benefits of biotechnology to the public. Recent Activities The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) and the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA), in an effort to strengthen the bilateral exchange of views on regulatory issues, jointly organized a State Department-funded Agricultural Biotech Assessment Study Team to visit the United States during August/September 2010. The Taiwan assessment team visited the U.S. biotech regulatory agencies and industries to receive updated information on the development of new concept biotech products and to discuss the safety assessment of new concept biotech products in the regulatory pipeline. A follow-up Biotech Assessment Case Study Workshop was conducted on September 15-16, 2011 in Taipei. Fifty Taiwan regulators and biotech assessment committee members participated. Four visiting U.S. regulators explained to the audience how biotech products are managed in the United States, helping to provide a better understanding of the U.S. regulatory system. Both the COA and TFDA are seeking opportunities for future exchanges with the United States under their respective regulatory portfolios. The American Institute in Taiwan, in coordination with U.S. biotech industries and TFDA, organized a seminar and roundtable discussion on allergenicity assessment of biotech products on December 14, 2010. In general, three risk communication seminars have addressed safety of biotech products for the general public during recent years, of which one was sponsored by TFDA and two by CropLife Taiwan (CLT). The most recent event was held by CLT in southern Taiwan on October 1, 2011. Section VI. Animal Biotechnology: GM Animals Several pharmaceutical applications on biotech animals are currently in laboratory trials. Transgenic pigs, cows, goats and chicken for biopharmaceutical uses have been or are being developed, but none of them have undergone field-testing. Taiwan has built a field-testing center at the Animal Technology Institute Taiwan (ATIT), a non-profit and government-supported body for transgenic pig, cow, chicken and goat field testing. The center has also established Standard Operation Practices (SOP) for field-testing. The center has been granted accreditation for operating field-testing. Taiwan has set its research focus on biopharmaceutical uses, using biotech animal as molecular ranch. The ongoing research is focused on mammary gland of transgenic-cloned goats as a bioreactor to produce coagulation factor VIII for hemophilia A treatment. Similar research is being conducted on transgenic pigs to produce human factor IX. GM Fish On April 3, 2009, Taiwan promulgated regulations governing testing on GM fish and aquatic plants. The very first field-testing center for transgenic fish in Taiwan is anticipated to begin operations in 2012. According to the COA, Taiwan?s transgenic fish research is focused on ornamental fish - in particular, fluorescent fish. Taiwan's Academia Sinica research institute announced a successful research project for developing larger-sized GM fluorescent fish. These domestically developed fluorescent fish are all infertile and are not for human consumption. On April 13, 2011, Taiwan promulgated the regulation governing commercial production and propagation of biotech aquatic animals and plants. Once domestically developed transgenic fluorescent fish goes through the regulatory process, it will be ready for marketing. The COA has built a new distribution center for the exportation of ornamental fish and fish fry at the Pingtung Agricultural Biotech Park located in southern Taiwan. Section VII. Current Approvals of Genetically Modified Products in Taiwan Update: September, 2011 Current approved products ? single trait UNIQUE DATE OF DATE OF PRODUCT NAME EVENT APPLICANT IDENTIFIER APPROVAL EXPIRATION 1 MON- Soybean Glyphosate 40-3-2 Monsanto Far July 22, July 22, Ø4Ø32-6 tolerant (RRS) East Ltd., 2002 2012 Roundup Ready Taiwan Soybean Branch 2 MON- Corn Insect-resistant MON810 Monsanto Far October 15, October 15, ØØ81Ø-6 YieldGard Corn East Ltd., 2002 T 2012 aiwan Branch 3 MON- Corn Glyphosate NK603 Monsanto Far April 11, April 11, ØØ6Ø3-6 tolerant East Ltd., 2003 Ro 2013 undup Ready Taiwan Corn Branch 4 SYN- Corn Insect-resistant Bt11 Syngenta June 2, June 2 , BTØ11-1 & Glufosinate Taiwan Ltd. 2004 2013 tolerant Corn 5 SYN-EV176- Corn Insect-resistant Event176 Syngenta June 2, June 2 , 9 & Glufosinate Taiwan Ltd. 2004 2013 tolerant Corn 6 ACS- Corn Glufosinate T25 Bayer Taiwan August 16, August 16, ZMØØ3-2 tolerant Corn Ltd. 2002 2012 7 DAS- Corn Insect-resistant TC1507 DuPont November November Ø15Ø7-1 & Glufosinate Taiwan 17, 2003 17, 2013 tolerant Corn 8 MON- Corn Insect-resistant, MON863 Monsanto Far October 16, October 16, ØØ863-5 YieldGard East Ltd., 2003 2013 Rootworm Corn Taiwan Branch 9 DAS- Corn Insect-resistant 59122 DuPont December December 21, 59122-7 & Glufosinate Taiwan 21, 2005 2015 tolerant Corn 10 MON- Corn YieldGard MON88017 Monsanto Far March 20, March 20, 88Ø17-3 Rootworm/ East Ltd., 2006 2016 Roundup Ready Taiwan Corn Branch 11 REN- Corn Lysine Maize LY038 Monsanto Far November November 20, ØØØ38-3 East Ltd., 20, 2011 Taiwan 2006 Branch 12 ACS- Soybean Glufosinate A2704-12 Bayer Taiwan May 1, May 1, GMØØ5-3 tolerant Ltd. 2007 2012 Soybean 13 SYN-IR6Ø4- Corn Insect-resistant MIR604 Syngenta October 22, October 22, 5 Corn Taiwan Ltd. 2007 2012 14 MON-89788- Soybean Roundup MON89788 Monsanto Far December December 28, 1 RReady2Yield East Ltd., 28, 2007 2012 Soybean Taiwan Branch 15 MON- Corn G July 23, lyphosate GA21 Syngenta July 23, ØØØ2 2008 1-9 tolerant Corn Taiwan Ltd. 2013 16 MON- Corn Insect-resistant MON89034 Monsan July 25, to Far July 25, 89Ø3 008 4-3 Corn Eas 2t Ltd., 2013 Taiwan Branch SYN-IR162- MIR162 17 Corn Insec pr 20, Apr 20, t-resistant Syngen Ata 4 Co 2009 2014 rn Taiwan Ltd. DP-356Ø43- 18 DP- Soybean G 11, lyphosate and DuPont May 11, May 5 356043-5 A 2014 cetolactate T 2009 aiwan Ltd. Synthase (ALS)- Inhibiting Herbicides Tolerant Soybean 19 DP- DP- Soybean High 23, July 23, Oleic DuPont July 3Ø5423-1 305423-1 2010 2015 Soybean Taiwan Ltd. SYN-E3272- 20 Corn ?-Amylase Event 3272 Syngenta Jul 26, Jul 26, 5 Corn Taiwan Ltd. 2010 2015 ACS- 21 Soybean Glufosinate A5547-127 GMØØ Bayer Ta Aug 31, Aug 31, iwan 6-4 tolerant Soybean L 2010 2015 td. 22 MON- san July 6, July 6, to Far 877Ø Soybean Insect-Protected MON87701 Mon1-2 Soybean Eas 2011 2016 t Ltd., Taiwan Branch Current approved products ? stacked trait UNIQUE DATE OF DATE OF PRODU PPLICA IDENTIFIE NAME EVENT A APPROV EXPIRATI R CT NT AL ON 1 MON- Corn Yie February ldGard VT Triple PRO MON890 Monsanto February 89Ø34-3 x 34 17, MON Corn Far East 17, - x 2009 88Ø17 ., 2014 -3 MON880 Ltd 17 Taiwan Branch 2 MON- Corn Yie MON890 Monsanto February ldGard VT PRO x February 89Ø34-3 x 34 Far East MON Ro 17, undup Ready Corn 2 17, - x Ltd., 9 ØØ6Ø3-6 NK6 Taiwan 200 2014 03 Branch 3 MON- Corn YieldGard VT Triple Corn MON880 Monsanto February February 88Ø17 Far East -3 x 17 17, MON Ltd., 17, - x Ta 2009 iwan ØØ 2014 81Ø-6 MON810 Branch 4 MON- Corn YieldGard x Roundup Ready MON810 Monsanto February February ØØ81Ø Corn 2 -6 x x Far East 17, MON 17, - NK603 Ltd., Ta 2009 iwan ØØ 2014 6Ø3-6 Branch 5 MON- Corn YieldGard Plus x Roundup MON863 Monsanto March 04, March 04, ØØ863 Ready Corn 2 -5 x x Far East 2009 2014 MON- MON810 Ltd., Taiwan ØØ81Ø-6x x Branch MONØØ6 NK603 Ø3-6 6 MON- Corn YieldGard Rootworm x MON863 Monsanto May 25, May 25, ØØ863 Roundup Ready Corn 2 Far East -5 x x 2009 MONØØ Ltd., 2014 6 NK603 Taiwan Ø3-6 Branch 7 MON- Corn YieldGard Plus Corn MON863 Monsanto July10, July10, ØØ863-5 x x Far East 2009 MON- MON810 Ltd., 2014 Taiwan ØØ81Ø-6 Branch 8 SYN- Corn Bt11 x MIR604 maize Bt11 Syngenta August 3, August 3, BT011 Taiwan -1 x x 2009 Ltd. 2014 SYN- MIR604 IR604-5 9 SYN- Corn Bt11 x GA21 maize Bt11 Syngenta August 3, August 3, BT011 Taiwan -1 x x 2009 MON Ltd. 2014 - GA21 00021-9 1 SYN- Corn MIR604 x GA21 maize MIR604 Syngenta August 3, August 3, 0 IR604-5 x Taiwan 2009 x MON- GA 4 21 Ltd. 201 00021-9 1 SYN- Corn Bt11 x MIR604 x GA21 Bt11 Syngenta August 3, August 3, 1 BT011 maize Taiwan -1 x x 2009 SYN- MIR 2014 604 Ltd. IR604-5 x x MON- GA21 00021-9 1 MON- Corn MON89034 x TC1507 x MON890 Monsanto Oct 12, Oct 12, 2 89Ø34 MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 -3 x 34 Far East 2009 DA Corn S- x L 2014 td., Ø15Ø7-1 Taiwan x TC1507 Branch MON- x 88Ø17-3 MON880 x 17 DAS- x 59122-7 DAS- 59122-7 1 MON- Corn MON89034 x TC1507 x MON890 Dow Oct 12, Oct 12, 3 89Ø34 MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 -3 x 34 AgroScien 2009 DAS Co 2014 rn - x ces Taiwan Ø15Ø7-1 Ltd. x TC1507 MON- x 88Ø17-3 MON880 x 17 DAS- x 59122-7 DAS- 59122-7 1 DAS- Corn TC1507xDAS-59122-7 TC1507 DuPont Dec 02, Dec12, 4 Ø15Ø7-1 x Maize x Taiwan MON- DAS 009 2014 - L 2td. ØØ603-6 59122-7 D1 AS-Ø15Ø7-1 x Corn TC1507xNK603 Maize TC1507 DuPont Dec 15, Dec 15, 5 DAS- x Taiwan 2009 2014 59122-7 NK603 Ltd. 1 DAS- Corn DAS- DAS- DuPont Dec 15, Dec 15, 6 59122-7 59122xTC1507xNK603 59122 Taiwan 2009 2014 x DAS- Maize x Ltd. Ø15Ø7-1 x TC1507 MON- x ØØ603-6 NK603 1 DAS- Corn DAS-59122xNK603 DAS- DuPont Jan 3, Jan 3, 7 59122-7 Maize 59122 Taiwan 2011 2016 x x Ltd. MON- NK603 ØØ603-6 1 MON-ØØ6Ø Corn NK603xT25 NK603 Monsanto May 30, May 30, 8 3-6 x Far East 2011 2016 x T25 Ltd., Taiwan ACS- Branch ZMØØ3-2 1 DAS- Corn TC1507xDAS-59122-7 TC1507 DuPont May 30, May 30, 9 Ø15Ø7-1 xMON810xNK603 x Taiwan 2011 2016 x DAS- Ltd. DAS-59122- 59122-7 7 x x MON810 MON- x ØØ81Ø-6 NK603 x MON- ØØ6Ø3-6 2 DAS- Corn TC1507xMON810xNK60 TC1507 DuPont May 30, May 30, 0 Ø15Ø7-1 3 x Taiwan 2011 2016 x MON- MON810 Ltd. ØØ81Ø-6 x x NK603 MON- ØØ6Ø3-6 2 SYN- Corn Bt11xMIR162xMIR604x Bt11 Syngenta May 30, May 30, 1 BTØ11 Taiwan -1 GA21 x 2011 2016 Ltd. x MIR162 SYN-IR162- x 4 MIR604 x x SYN-IR6Ø4- GA21 5 x MON- ØØØ21-9 2 SYN- Corn Bt11xMIR162xGA21 Bt11 Syngenta May 30, May 30, 2 BTØ11 Taiwan -1 x 2011 2016 x MIR162 Ltd. SYN-IR162- x 4 GA21 x MON- ØØØ21-9 2 MON- Corn MON89034xTC1507xNK MON890 Dow August 22, August 22, 3 89Ø34-3 603 34 Ag 2011 2016 roScien x x DAS- TC1507 ces Taiwan Ø15Ø7-1 x Ltd.; x MON- NK603 Monsanto ØØ6Ø3-6 Far East Ltd., Taiwan Branch 2 SYN-E3272- Corn 3272xBt11xMIR604xGA 3272 Syngen Sep 5, Sep 5, ta 4 5 21 x 2011 2016 x B Taiwan t11 SYN- x Ltd. BTØ11-1 MIR604 x x SYN- GA21 IR6Ø4-5 x MON-00021- 9
Posted: 27 November 2011

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